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Posts on ‘October 15th, 2012’

120 years on, Shell hungry for Thai gas

Royal Dutch Shell is looking to expand its business in Thailand to liquefied natural gas (LNG) and tap strong gas demand in the local market, says new country chairman Asada Harinsuit.

Published: 16/10/2012 at 01:55 AM

Royal Dutch Shell is looking to expand its business in Thailand to liquefied natural gas (LNG) and tap strong gas demand in the local market, says new country chairman Asada Harinsuit.

Mr Asada noted that gas demand has skyrocketed here because gas is cleaner and cost-competitive.

“Thailand’s power demand will double in the next decade and concerns about climate change have been growing, making gas a more promising choice for the country,” he said. read more

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Shell’s arctic spill barge gets approval

Published: Oct. 15, 2012 at 9:19 AM

ANCHORAGE, Alaska, Oct. 15 (UPI) — Energy company Shell announced it received certification from the U.S. Coast Guard for its oil-spill containment vessel for use offshore Alaska.

Shell said its Arctic Challenger containment barge was given the necessary permits, which means its safety assets will be in place for the 2013 drilling season.

Earlier this year, the company said it was abandoning certain aspects of its arctic program offshore Alaska because of encroaching sea ice and problems with the containment vessel meant to respond to any potential spill in the Chukchi Sea. read more

royaldutchshellplc.com and its sister websites royaldutchshellgroup.com, shellenergy.website, shellnazihistory.com, royaldutchshell.website, johndonovan.website, shellnews.net and shell2004.com are all owned by John Donovan. There is also a Wikipedia article.

Shell’s $4.5bn Alaskan adventure is a comedy caper

Six years in the making, the oil giant’s farcical Alaskan exploration is not what you’d expect from a FTSE-100 company.

“What next? A polar bear attack? Maybe Shell chief executive Peter Voser and his intrepid Alaskan explorers have a secret plan to sell the film rights. You know, produce a rival to the Ice Age series, only funnier. And with a different sort of cast – a 36-year-old oil spill barge, the US Environmental Audit Committee and, unbelievably, blocks of ice turning up in the Arctic of all places.”

What next? A polar bear attack?

Maybe Shell chief executive Peter Voser and his intrepid Alaskan explorers have a secret plan to sell the film rights. You know, produce a rival to the Ice Age series, only funnier. And with a different sort of cast – a 36-year-old oil spill barge, the US Environmental Audit Committee and, unbelievably, blocks of ice turning up in the Arctic of all places.

Whatever, Voser’s $4.5bn Alaskan drilling blockbuster is turning out to be a right comedy caper. Everyone knows why Shell is there: Alaska’s one of the last great exploration frontiers, home to around 6pc of the world’s recoverable oil. But six years in the making, Shell’s adventure in the Chukchi and Beaufort seas is not what you’d expect from one of the biggest companies on the planet. read more

royaldutchshellplc.com and its sister websites royaldutchshellgroup.com, shellenergy.website, shellnazihistory.com, royaldutchshell.website, johndonovan.website, shellnews.net and shell2004.com are all owned by John Donovan. There is also a Wikipedia article.

Protecting universal human rights

Letter to the Editor

Published: October 14

The Post missed the mark in its Oct. 5 editorial “Court shopping,” which advocated clear limits on the scope of the Alien Tort Statute (ATS). In Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum (Shell), the complaint is that Shell directly assisted the Nigerian military in torturing and killing innocent villagers. If true, the purpose of Shell’s misconduct was to gain economic advantage in its business. Shell argued that as a Dutch corporation, it should not have to answer in America for these alleged human-rights abuses.Shell is wrong. The United States should enforce the universally accepted international law against torture. Shell is a multinational corporation that operates a billion-dollar business in America. If Shell has used torture to gain an advantage in its business, including its massive U.S. operations, we have a direct interest in holding Shell responsible for its conduct. A level playing field, free from torture as a tool for reducing costs, is an essential feature for the U.S. petroleum market. We also have an interest in providing justice to the Kiobel plaintiffs, who are lawful U.S. residents.

The United States also has an obvious interest in making universally recognized human rights protections effective. Our Founders enacted the ATS two centuries ago to affirm our commitment to the rule of international law among all the world’s nations. Indeed, in 1795, the U.S. attorney general specifically advised that the ATS open our courts to violations of international law in Africa. More than 200 hundred years later, in an interconnected global economy, our interest in upholding the statute and the remedies it affords is stronger than ever. read more

royaldutchshellplc.com and its sister websites royaldutchshellgroup.com, shellenergy.website, shellnazihistory.com, royaldutchshell.website, johndonovan.website, shellnews.net and shell2004.com are all owned by John Donovan. There is also a Wikipedia article.
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