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Posts Tagged ‘Oil Prices’

Why $55 Brent Is Big News For Shell

: Sept 21, 2017

Summary

  • Checking out high-yielding Royal Dutch Shell plc.
  • Brent bouncing up to over $55/barrel is big news that I think has been under-reported in the financial media.
  • Overview of Shell’s finances and significance of higher Brent prices.

In light of material increases in realized upstream prices and an improving downstream sector, Royal Dutch Shell plc’s (NYSE:RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) financials have shown tremendous improvement this year. The worst of the downturn is behind the oil sector, but keep in mind crude prices remain range-bound. That being said, with Brent (global oil benchmark) back over $55/barrel (high end of the range), things are looking brighter and brighter for Royal Dutch Shell every day. Especially when it comes to fully covering Royal Dutch Shell plc Class A and Class B shares’ lofty 6+% yields. Let’s dig in. read more

Will Shell’s Gas Gamble Pay Off?

By Cyril Widdershoven – Sep 16, 2017, 6:00 PM CDT

Supermajor Royal Dutch Shell has decided to divest its Iraqi oil assets in a move to focus on its future in natural gas.

The industry giant is seemingly breaking from its oil heritage to head full speed into the “Golden Age of Gas.” Shell’s decision to leave Iraq’s upstream oil assets is not without risk, however, as the market for natural gas is even more oversupplied than it is for crude oil.

Reuters reported the move first, based on a letter from the Iraqi ministry of oil, followed by a confirmation from Shell. The Dutch heavyweight indicated to the press that its oil asset divestment in Iraq is in line with its strategy to focus more on natural gas and downstream activities. read more

Shell Targets Alternative Fuel Stations

By Tsvetana Paraskova – Sep 12, 2017, 12:30 PM CDT

Shell—one of the oil majors that is increasingly betting on natural gas and low-carbon fuels—is targeting 20 percent of its global fuel station sales to come from electric vehicles recharging and low-carbon fuels by 2025, John Abbott, Downstream Director at Shell, told Reuters in an interview published on Tuesday.

While Shell plans to expand fuel stations in China, India, and Mexico—where it sees growth in this market over the next decade—it would continue to focus on meeting demand for cars running on fuels alternative to gasoline and diesel, Abbott said. read more

INTERVIEW-Electric cars and renewables not enough to meet Paris climate goal – consultant

Despite the rise in renewable energy, it is gas that will overtake oil as the world’s biggest energy source by 2034… This thinking underpinned, for example, Royal Dutch Shell’s $54 billion takeover of BG Group last year.

* World will miss Paris target under current projections

* Energy demand seen peaking around 2030

* Electricity output to rise 140 pct by 2050 

* Gas to overtake oil as main energy source by 2034

By Karolin Schaps

ARNHEM, The Netherlands, Sept 5 (Reuters) – The cost of electric vehicles (EVs) will fall to match those running on combustion engines by 2022, a key trigger that will mean by 2035 half of all passenger vehicles sold globally will be electric, according to the head of a top energy consultancy. read more

Exclusive: Shell’s CEO – Oil slide is “biggest blessing”

“There were a few mishaps in BG that really hammered their share price and we saw them coming into this funny situation where the share price came down, but we could only see the value go up so we needed to take a hardened look at it again,” Mr van Beurden said. “And then while we were looking at it the oil price started crashing, which actually opened the window even further.”

Energy editor Rita Brown heads to the Hague to hear exclusively how Shell’s chief executive has viewed the last three years since the oil price crash

Written by

Ben van Beurden’s rise to the top coincided with the oil price riding the crest of a wave.

But for a man who assumed Shell’s chief executive role just months before it all came crashing down, he sums up the last three years as “a blessing”.

“Less than a year into my new role, the oil price started going down and it’s been quite a journey, but if I look back on it I think this is probably the biggest blessing that I’ve had,” he said.

“It has done two things. First of all it provided a tremendous amount of focus on the things that needed doing. I mean, there’s nothing like a crisis to focus on cost efficiency. read more

Hurricane Harvey Tosses Global Oil Markets Into Chaos

By Nick Cunningham – Aug 28, 2017, 6:00 PM CDT

The most powerful Hurricane to hit Texas in more than 50 years has devastated much of the coast, and the historic flooding is now causing havoc in the energy markets.

The rain is not over, and will continue over the next few days, spilling a year’s worth of rain within a week.

ExxonMobil shut down its Baytown refinery, the second largest in the United States with a capacity of 560,500 bpd. Royal Dutch Shell closed its 360,000 bpd Deer Park refinery, according to S&P Global Platts, and Phillips 66 shut down its 247,000 bpd Sweeny refinery. read more

Royal Dutch Shell In The Clear

: Aug 23, 2017

Summary

  • Shell’s latest quarter was marked by successful cost reductions and acquisition-related synergies.
  • Shell seems to be able to meet its cash flow obligations without much trouble.
  • I recommend Shell for income investors, but with a few caveats.

Back on May 24th I “sounded the all clear” on Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B). Shell, I felt, would henceforth be able to pay its dividends and capital expenditure from operational cash flow. Shell’s latest quarter was another continuation of that, with ongoing synergies from the huge BG Group acquisition two years ago and also continued opex savings. Shell’s pro-forma workforce is about 30% smaller than it was in the beginning of 2016, and while that may not be good for employees who were laid off, it is a reflection of impressive modernization and productivity gains from the company itself. read more

Hints Shell is searching for life after oil

The management team wants the company to focus on long-term returns, which means investing in different types of projects.

Tyler Crowe: (TMFDirtyBird):Aug 17, 2017 Like so many other integrated oil and gas companies, Royal Dutch Shell‘s (NYSE:RDS-A) (NYSE:RDS-B) goal of the past several years was to preserve capital by any means possible in the short term without giving up too much of the future. Based on the company’s most recent earnings report, it has done a pretty good job of achieving that first goal. The second part? That is all up to what Shell’s management does from here.There were several hints on the company’s most recent conference call that suggest Shell has developed a new playbook that looks very different than its prior one. Here are quotes from that conference call that show Shell’s possible future.

Making the grade

Shell has been trying to pull off an elaborate corporate shift over the past couple of years. It wanted to absorb and integrate BG Group into Shell, unload about $30 billion in assets from the combined company to lower total debt levels, reduce operating costs and capital spending, and get back to generating enough cash to cover capital expenditures and dividends. To make this transformation even more challenging, it was trying to do it in a low oil price environment.

Based on the company’s most recent performance, it looks like management has pulled it off. Here’s CEO Ben van Beurden taking stock of the situation. read more

Shell Prepares For A Different Energy Reality

: 14 August 2017

Summary

  • This summer has seen the governments of several of the world’s major economies propose to eliminate internal combustion engine vehicles over the next 10-30 years.
  • At the same time, Royal Dutch Shell announced several major clean energy investments over the summer in anticipation of a drop-off in petroleum demand.
  • This article looks at how Shell’s clean energy investments fit into its energy profile forecasts compared to its peers.

This summer has been filled with the sort of headlines that can give strategic planners in the petroleum & gas sector heartburn. One-upping Germany’s earlier non-binding pledge to ban new internal combustion engine [ICE] vehicles by 2030, the government of France’s new centrist president Emmanuel Macron announced in early July that the country will end sales of ICE vehicles by 2040. This move, which is part of that country’s efforts to comply with its greenhouse gas emission reduction target under 2015’s Paris Climate Agreement, would eliminate gasoline- and diesel-only engines and is aimed at reducing the country’s air pollution as it is at mitigating climate change. Britain intends to do the same by 2050. Even China and India, which have long been posited as important future sources of petroleum demand, are moving to electrify their vehicle fleets: China recently announced that it wants 25% of the country’s vehicles to be “alternative fuel” by 2025, while India is drafting plans to electrify all of its vehicles by 2030. read more

Protesters storm Shell crude flow station in Niger Delta

Tife Owolabi: AUGUST 11, 2017 / 11:13 AM

AKUKU-TORU, Nigeria (Reuters) – Hundreds of Nigerian protesters stormed a crude oil flow station owned by Shell in the restive Niger Delta on Friday demanding jobs and infrastructure development, a Reuters witness said.

The protesters complained they were not benefiting from oil production in their area, a common refrain in the impoverished swampland that produces most of Nigeria’s oil. They also demanded an end to oil pollution in the area. read more

Oil Poised for Weekly Loss Amid Weaker Demand Outlook

IEA sees OPEC’s commitment to clearing global glut fading Agency reduced demand estimates for this year and 2018

Royal Dutch Shell Plc has restarted four units at its Pernis refinery and more will be brought online in the coming days, according to an environmental regulator.

Oil slipped, heading for the biggest weekly loss in a month, as the outlook for demand dimmed amid an already shaky market.

Futures dropped 0.8 percent in New York Friday, poised for a weekly decline of 2.8 percent. The International Energy Agency reduced demand estimates for OPEC crude this year and in 2018, and said there are doubts about the group’s commitment to cutting production, according to its monthly report released Friday. Even a pledge by Saudi Arabia and Iraq to strengthen their commitment to the curbs and maintain balance in world crude markets isn’t helping to prop up prices. read more

Nigeria’s state oil company signs deals with Chevron, Shell

LAGOS, Aug 3 (Reuters) – Nigeria’s state oil company said on Thursday it had signed financing agreements with Chevron and Shell worth at least $780 million to boost crude production and reserves.

The Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) said a joint venture agreement with Chevron Nigeria Limited would see the development of proven and probable reserves of 211 million barrels at the joint Sonam project.

“The project is expected to begin to bear fruits in (the) next three and six months,” NNPC said in a statement, adding it was targeting production of 39,000 barrels per day of liquids and 283 million standard cubic feet of gas per day. read more

The Secret Behind Better Oil Major Earnings

By Gregory Brew – Aug 02, 2017, 6:00 PM CDT

After several years of austerity and belt-tightening, the major international oil companies posted substantial profits in Q2 of 2017. The five largest private oil companies together generated more than $30 billion in profit, an indication that most have successfully adapted to the current bout of low prices, while a few have publicly indicated their belief that prices will hover around $50 for the foreseeable future.

What this means is that the “mega projects” that dominated many companies’ balance sheets for the last decade will become increasingly rare, as the majors pivot towards short-term, low-risk ventures with a faster turnaround. A closer look at each company shows how individual firms have adapted in distinct ways to this new era. read more

Who needs oil at $100? Majors making cash at $50: Goldman

BloombergUpdated: Aug 03, 2017, 08.55 AM IST

Integrated giants like BP and Royal Dutch Shell have adapted to lower prices by cutting costs and improving operations, analysts at the bank including Michele Della Vigna said in a research note on Wednesday.

European majors made more cash during the first half of this year, when Brent averaged $52 a barrel, than they did in the first half of 2014 when prices were $109. Back then, high oil prices had caused executives to overreach on projects, leading to delays, cost overruns and in inefficiency, Goldman said. read more

Shale drillers show few signs of slowing as profits expand

Shale drillers show few signs of slowing as profits expand

The optimism from the U.S. shale fields followed quarterly reports last week that showed major international producers including Exxon Mobil Corp. and Royal Dutch Shell Plc are also learning to make money at $50 a barrel…

Alex Nussbaum and Joe Carroll, Bloomberg: Published 6:46 am, Wednesday, August 2, 2017

The shale surge that’s tied down global oil prices shows no signs of abating, as four of the biggest U.S. drillers said they’re not backing away from lofty production targets for 2017.

In second-quarter earnings reports, EOG Resources Inc., Devon Energy Corp., Newfield Exploration Co. and Diamondback Energy Inc. all outlined goals on Tuesday that would help push U.S. output toward a record 10 million barrels a day next year. Even Pioneer Natural Resources Co., which trimmed the top end of its forecast due to delays in the Permian shale basin, still expects to increase oil and natural gas volumes by 16 percent at year’s end. read more

Energy Shares Fall As OPEC Production Seen Picking Up – Energy Roundup

A fire outage at the largest oil refinery in Europe, a Royal Dutch Shell facility in the Netherlands, is ongoing, driving up prices of oil derivatives.

Dow Jones Newswires

Shares of energy producers ticked down as the price of oil foundered around the psychologically significant $50-a-barrel level. Among the data weighing on oil prices was a Reuters survey showing that OPEC production rose to its highest level in seven months last month. BP said it could now turn a profit with oil prices at these levels, saying its could break even with oil as low as $47 a barrel. BP swung to a second-quarter profit even as it absorbed further costs from the 2010 oil spill and as oil futures remained stuck in the $40s. A fire outage at the largest oil refinery in Europe, a Royal Dutch Shell facility in the Netherlands, is ongoing, driving up prices of oil derivatives. read more

Oil Companies at Last See Path to Profits After Painful Spell

ABERDEEN, Scotland — This port city built of granite on the North Sea has taken a battering in recent years. Plunging oil prices hit the petroleum industry, which dominates the economy. Tens of thousands of jobs were slashed. Projects worth billions of dollars were sent back to the drawing board.

Oil executives here now speak with a relief similar to survivors of a fierce storm.

“I feel good about the North Sea, to tell you the truth,” Mark J. Thomas, North Sea regional president for the oil giant BP, said in an interview at the company’s offices near Aberdeen’s airport. “It is remarkably different than where we were even just a few years ago.” read more

Royal Dutch Shell Gearing Up To Stay ‘Fit For The Forties’

By Aisha Rahman: Jul. 31, 2017 6:49 PM ET

Summary

Q2 2017 saw better YoY profits. However, the same cannot be said for QoQ results, due to lower oil prices in Q2.

There were notable improvements in the cash flow position, and I expect this trend to continue on for the rest of the year.

As the company gears up to stay “resilient to market changes,” it is seeking to control its cost lines and step into the renewable energy business.

I had written an earnings preview on Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) a few days before the company posted its Q2 results for the year. I decided to do a spin-off article to that in response to their earnings announcement for the quarter, and talk about the tone the company has set for the rest of the year. read more

BP and Shell face huge challenge from switch to electric cars

Petrol pumps will become a thing of the past as charging points replace them: WEEGEE (ARTHUR FELLIG)/INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY/GETTY IMAGES

Emily Gosden, Energy Editor: 31 July 2017

Oil investors are getting worried. Electric cars have accelerated on to the front pages. Sales are surging, carmakers are unveiling plans for all-electric models and this week Britain vowed to ban sales of petrol and diesel cars by 2040.

Yet if Big Oil believes that death is about to pull up in a Tesla, it’s doing a good job of hiding it. On Thursday, Ben van Beurden, the boss of Royal Dutch Shell, welcomed Britain’s plans and declared that his next car would be electric. And earlier in the year Spencer Dale, BP’s chief economist, bluntly described the arrival of electric vehicles on the oil majors’ lawn as “not a game-changer”, adding that not even “enormous” growth in sales of such vehicles would make a big dent in global oil demand. read more

OPEC’s Existential Sucker Punch

Julian Lee: July 30, 2017 3:00 AM EDT

You wait decades for an existential crisis, then two come along at once. At least that’s how it must feel for OPEC’s beleaguered ministers. In the short term the market for their oil is being eroded by rising production outside their control. Looking further ahead, oil demand itself is under threat from the electrification of road transport. OPEC may not yet be dead, but its days are surely numbered.

The most obvious short-term threat to the group comes from the rapid rise in U.S. shale oil, but the risks have expanded to include other areas like Brazil’s prolific sub-salt discoveries and more recent finds further north along the east coast of South America. read more

The electric jolt that roused Big Oil

Jillian Ambrose: 

Identifying a tipping point is not always easy. But when one of the world’s most powerful oil bosses says he is in the market for an electric car, there can be little doubt.

Ben van Beurden, the Royal Dutch Shell boss, last week delivered the clearest indication yet that the burgeoning electric vehicle industry is already hastening the decline of global oil demand. “When that will be is not certain. But that it will happen, we are certain,” he told investors. read more

Cheap oil forcing a rethink, says Royal Dutch Shell

  • The Wall Street Journal

Royal Dutch Shell has presented a pessimistic vision for the future of oil, even as the company reported success in generating cash during a prolonged energy downturn.

Shell has cut costs and said it was preparing for a world in which crude prices might never regain precrash levels and petroleum demand declined.

Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden said the company had a mindset that oil prices would remain “lower forever” .

“We have to have projects that are resilient in a world where oil has peaked,” Mr van Beurden told reporters on a conference call discussing the company’s second-quarter financial results. “When it will happen we don’t know, but that it will happen we are certain.” read more

Shell Braces For ‘Lower Forever’ Oil As Profits Soar

Shell Braces For ‘Lower Forever’ Oil As Profits Soar

by  Reuters: Ron Bousso & Karolin Schaps: Thursday, July 27, 2017

LONDON, July 27 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell is gearing up for a world of “lower forever” oil prices, its Chief Executive Ben van Beurden said on Thursday, after the company’s profits tripled in the second quarter.

The oil and gas industry has struggled with three years of weak prices while also facing the prospect of oil demand plateauing by the end of the next decade.

But Europe’s largest energy company was able to boost its profits more than expected, increase cash flow to $12.2 billion and reduce debt thanks to asset sales and as big savings introduced since the oil price collapse kicked in. read more

Shell CEO Ben Van Beurden says his next car will be an electric Mercedes S500e


Jul 28 2017 at 9:03 AM

When the boss of Europe’s biggest listed oil company says his next car will be electric, it says a lot about the future of fossil fuels.

Royal Dutch Shell responded to the worst oil-price crash in a generation with its $US54 billion ($68 billion) takeover of BG Group, betting that demand for natural gas will rise as the world shifts to cleaner-burning fuels. Now chief executive officer Ben Van Beurden says the next thing he’ll buy is a car that doesn’t depend on either oil or gas to run. read more

Shell preparing for world economy that shifts away from oil

By DANICA KIRKA Associated Press

Royal Dutch Shell is planning for the day when demand for oil starts fading as major economies move away from oil and increasingly turn to electric-powered cars, Chief Executive Ben van Beurden said Thursday.

Van Beurden welcomed recent proposals to phase out passenger vehicles powered by fossil fuels in Britain and France, saying they are needed to combat global warming. Shell is looking at “very aggressive scenarios” as it makes plans to remain competitive in a world that gets more of its energy from renewable sources and less from crude oil, or “liquids,” he said. read more

Shell gets everything right except producing oil

Andy Critchlow: JULY 27, 2017

LONDON (Reuters Breakingviews) – Royal Dutch Shell is great at producing profit, but less so at producing oil. The Anglo-Dutch energy giant has more than tripled its earnings in the second quarter, helped by the strong performance of its downstream refining business and recovering prices. With its debt falling too, the company is doing the right things for shareholders – except in the crucial area of pumping more fuel.

At first glance, Shell’s financial performance suggests that three years in the doldrums for big oil majors may have come to an end. On Thursday, the company reported an impressive 245 percent year-on-year rebound in clean earnings to $3.6 billion for the three-month period ending in June. Prices, which recovered from a slump last January below $30 per barrel, have helped, but there is more to it. read more

Shell sees oil demand peaking by late 2020s as electric car sales grow

By Ron Bousso and Karolin Schaps

LONDON, July 27 (Reuters) – The world’s oil consumption could peak as early as the end of the next decade as electric vehicles become more popular, Royal Dutch Shell Chief Executive Ben van Beurden said on Thursday.

The prospect of a decline in oil consumption after more than a century of growth as the world switches to burning cleaner fuels is gathering pace. On Wednesday Britain announced plans to ban diesel and gasoline vehicles by 2040, following a similar move by France. read more

Europe’s Oil Giants Recover From Three-Year Slump

LONDON/PARIS — Europe’s major oil and gas companies have turned a corner after a three-year slump, reporting strong growth in profits as cost cutting paid off and vowing to press on with saving more money amid a fragile recovery in oil prices.

Royal Dutch Shell, France’s Total and Norway’s Statoil reported sharp increases in cash flow from operations in the second quarter as profits beat analyst expectations, meaning they can all comfortably pay dividends and reduce debt. read more

Shell profits surge as Van Beurden puts focus on ‘discipline’

By Press Association: 

Royal Dutch Shell has reported a large rise in second quarter profits after the energy giant was boosted by higher oil and gas prices.

The firm said adjusted earnings rose from $1.05bn (£800m) to $3.6bn, an increase of 245pc, as chief executive Ben van Beurden said he was making progress on “reshaping the company”.

“Cash generation has been resilient over four consecutive quarters, at an average oil price of just under $50 per barrel,” Mr Van Beurden said. read more

Shell Profits Triple on Stronger Refining, Oil Prices

Shell CEO Ben van Beurden

LONDON — Royal Dutch Shell more than tripled its profits in the second quarter to beat forecasts boosted by strong refining operations and a rise in oil prices.

The Anglo-Dutch oil and gas company also reported a huge recovery in cash flow to $12.2 billion and a drop in debt as its cost reduction efforts in recent years paid off. It has sold some $25 billion of assets since acquiring BG Group last year.

The strong results came despite a dip in oil and gas production versus the previous quarter as a result of reduced output from a facility in Qatar. read more

Royal Dutch Shell’s earnings more than triple in 2Q

July 27 at 2:53 AM

LONDON — Royal Dutch Shell says second-quarter earnings more than tripled as it benefited from a cost-cutting drive and recovering oil prices.The Anglo-Dutch energy giant said Thursday that profit adjusted for changes in the value of inventories and excluding one-time items rose to $3.60 billion from $1.05 billion in the same period last year. Net income rose 31 percent to $1.55 billion.CEO Ben van Beurden says the earnings reflect Shell’s restructuring to cope with lower oil prices and the purchase of natural gas producer BG Group. Shell’s oil price averaged $45.62 a barrel for the quarter, up 16 percent from a year earlier. Prices were above $100 a barrel as recently as 2014. Van Beurden says the “external price environment and energy sector developments mean we will remain very disciplined.” 

Shell profits set to treble as prices rise and costs cut

Oil companies have focused on cost cutting as they adjust to a prolonged period of lower prices, raising fears of more job losses

Analysts expect the Anglo-Dutch group to have one of the strongest performances of the oil majors in the three months to June, with profits leaping to $3.15 billion, from $1.05 billion in the same period last year.

However, the second quarter last year was a torrid one for oil giants after the collapse in crude prices.

Shell’s results a year ago were also weighed down by hundreds of millions of dollars of one-off redundancy and restructuring charges after its takeover of BG Group, cutting its headline profits to only $239 million. read more

After false dawn, Big Oil to double down on cost cuts

LONDON (Reuters) – After a brief respite at the start of the year, the world’s top oil and gas companies are set to double down on cost cutting as a recovery in crude prices after a three-year slump falters.

Corporate hopes were raised by a deal between members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and other non-OPEC producers to cut production, which lifted oil prices above $58 a barrel in January, after they had slid to as low as $27 in 2016.

But Brent crude prices have since slipped back below $50 and banks have lowered price forecasts, amid surging output from the United States and other nations not bound by the global oil pact. read more

Who Stands To Gain The Most From Oil’s Rise In Price?

: 20 July 2017

Summary

*Five of the largest oil sector firms all move directly with the price of oil, but at varying degrees.

*ConocoPhillips has historically moved at an almost dollar per dollar ratio to oil.

*Shell and BP are far less sensitive to the change in oil prices as their American counterparts.

*BP has a quarter of the sensitivity to the price of oil as ConocoPhillips does.

By Eric Mason

As oil approaches its consensus floor for price per barrel, the next move can only be upwards. To take advantage of this pending uptick, which of the major oil sector firms offers the best growth relative to the price of oil? This article will help shine some light on which stock is the best pick for gains. read more

4 Things Royal Dutch Shell’s CFO Thinks You Should Know

Tyler Crowe: (TMFDirtyBird): 17 July 2017

We all knew that Royal Dutch Shell‘s (NYSE:RDS-A) (NYSE:RDS-B) management had big plans to transform the company post-BG Group merger, but I don’t think we anticipated it to happen this quickly. Not only has the company executed tens of billions in asset sales over the past several months, but the company’s cash flows from operations seem to suggest that management is wringing out a lot of inefficiencies that have plagued Shell’s returns for years. read more

Royal Dutch Shell: Talking The Talk, But Walking The Walk?

: July 12, 2017

Summary

  • CEO Ben van Beurden reinforces Shell’s readiness to play its part in achieving Paris agreement targets, but execution on this goal unclear.
  • Shell to acquire Texas company MP2 Energy, which has renewable energy and demand response focus.
  • Shell endorses Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures report.

There is massive change happening in the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy in the power and transport industries. While the major oil and gas companies have acknowledged the change, apart from Total (NYSE:TOT) there is little indication that other oil companies Exxon Mobil (NYSE:XOM), Chevron (NYSE:CVX) or BP (NYSE:BP) have concrete plans to change quickly. Here I consider whether Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.A)(NYSE:RDS.B) is getting serious about the change.

All of the oil and gas majors are under pressure, but Shell is particularly challenged as its debt has blown out due the acquisition of BG Group for $50 billion. A key part of the next steps involves debt reduction through divestment. The BG investment could prove problematic as the world is awash with new LNG projects coming on stream. For the last 3 quarters it could pay its high dividend (6.9%) from free cash flow, but this was in an environment where the Brent price was $54/barrel. This can’t continue if the oil price stays where it is now. So it is a pretty challenging time for Shell. read more

Oil Majors Face Ratings Cuts Amid Weak Recovery, S&P Global Says

Exxon Mobil Corp., Chevron Corp. and other oil majors could see their credit ratings slashed again if they fail to cut costs and reduce their growing debt loads in the next year, according to an S&P Global Ratings report.

The world’s largest drillers failed to take advantage of high prices during the boom years before 2014 to repay debt, according to the report published on Tuesday. Instead they embarked on costly investments in new projects and dividends, leaving them unprepared for the painful downturn that ensued. read more

How Safe Is The Dividend Of Royal Dutch Shell?

How Safe Is The Dividend Of Royal Dutch Shell?

: July 10, 2017

Summary

*Royal Dutch Shell has not cut its dividend since World War II.

*However, its dividend growth rate has been lackluster at best during the last decade.

*Its dividend payout ratio is remarkably high while its net debt has almost doubled during the last 4 years.

*On the other hand, the company intends to sell $25 B of assets this and next year.

While Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) has retrieved half of its losses since it bottomed early last year, it is still 25% lower than its peak three years ago, just before the collapse of the oil price began. As the downturn in the oil market has already lasted longer than initially anticipated, with no light on the horizon yet, the shareholders of the stock are still in pain. Therefore, given that the generous dividend of the stock is the only consolation to the shareholders, it is important for them to evaluate how safe the dividend is. read more

It’s a world of worry for oil companies

By Ryan Maye Handy: 8 July 2017

India hopes to sell only electric vehicles by 2030. China is offering incentives to buy electric cars and investing heavily in renewable technologies. Volvo will scrap the pure internal combustion engine in favor of hybrids and electric cars.

And on Thursday, France announced it plans to ban the sale of diesel and gasoline-fueled cars by 2040.

The world’s major oil companies might disagree when global demand for petroleum will peak, but the news of the past seven months suggests that they should be worried, if they aren’t already. Nations, states and private companies are demanding cleaner energy, leaving the world’s oil producers to face a reckoning that many haven’t yet accepted. read more

Shell director says downstream business fundamental to paying off debt, maintaining dividends

Oil and gas giant Royal Dutch Shell has delivered far more cash from its downstream business than its upstream recently, Downstream Director John Abbott told CNBC on Wednesday, with the firm positioned to use the extra funds to pay off debt and maintain its dividends.

“I have seen times in my 36 years in Shell where upstream has delivered far more cash than the downstream (but) we are seeing a reverse at the moment,” Abbott said. read more

Crude Slump Wipes $113 Billion From Oil Drillers

By Rakteem Katakey: 30 June 2017

Oil companies have spent three years slashing spending and firing workers to protect profits, only to find their hard work blown away as prices entered another bear market. The MSCI World Energy Sector Index is heading for a second consecutive quarter of declines, mirroring the drop in crude. The 90 companies that make up the index, including giants like Exxon Mobil Corp. and Royal Dutch Shell Plc, have together lost $115 billion in market value since the start of April, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. read more

Canada M&A Hits Decade-High as Foreign Owners Flee Oil Sands

Mergers and acquisitions in Canada are set for the strongest start in a decade as foreigners sell their oil sands investments. ConocoPhillips and Royal Dutch Shell Plc are leading the exodus amid a bear market for crude. However, Canadian producers are responding by pumping money into oil deposits in the remote boreal forests, which trail only Saudi Arabia and Venezuela in proved reserves but are more expensive to extract.

FULL ARTICLE

Does sub-$50 oil mean Royal Dutch Shell plc’s dividend will be cut?

By  24 Jun 2017, 8:57

At the end of last year, when it looked as if OPEC was making a concerted effort to rein-in oil market oversupply, shares in Royal Dutch Shell(LSE: RDSB) charged to a 52-week high of just under 2,400p. Unfortunately, this rally didn’t last long. By the end of the first quarter, the shares had fallen by nearly 10% and have continued to slide as worries about a new oil glut have continued to grow. The falling oil price has reignited the argument about the sustainability of Shell’s dividend payout. read more

Global oil price falls to nine-month low as oversupply fears mount

A number of producers – notably Iraq, Saudi Arabia and Russia – have aggressively ramped up output

Oil prices held near multi-month lows on Wednesday as investors discounted evidence of strong compliance by OPEC and non-OPEC oil producers with a deal to cut a global output.

Global benchmark Brent LCOc1 was unchanged at $46.02 barrel at 0651 GMT after falling nearly 2 per cent in the previous session to its lowest settlement since November.

US crude futures CLc1 for August were trading up 4 cents at $43.55, after spending much of the day slightly lower and falling more than 2 per cent on Tuesday to the lowest since September. read more

Collapsing oil prices could fall into the $30s before the selling stops, analysts say

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Oil prices could slide back into the $30s per barrel before the sell-off ends and prices stabilize, analysts said, bringing pain to both OPEC and its archrival — the U.S. shale industry

West Texas Intermediate oil futures for July were trading around $43 per barrel Tuesday, and Brent futures were just above $45. One catalyst for the decline was a report that Libyan oil production has returned to close to 900,000 barrels a day, its highest level in four years. Growing U.S. production and stubbornly high inventories has been another driver of lower prices. read more

UK Government pays Shell £112m tax rebate despite oil giant making billions in profits

The UK Government handed Shell a £112m tax rebate last year, despite the oil giant making billions of pounds in profits.

Most of the payment from HM Revenue and Customs is a contribution towards Shell’s costs for decommissioning its North Sea oil and gas fields. It follows a similar payment of £85m in 2016.

The figures highlight how the North Sea has transformed from being a cash cow for the Government over four decades, to being a drain on the nation’s finances, as the remaining oil has become unprofitable to extract. read more

BP and Shell profits under renewed pressure as oil price hits 2017 low

By HARVEY JONES:

Crude slumped last week after a shock rise in US stockpiles, up 3.3million barrels to 513million, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). 

Brent crude slipped to about $48 a barrel, its lowest level since December, and analysts said it could go sharply lower. 

Crude dipped below $27 a barrel in January last year and Chris Beauchamp, chief market analyst at online trading platform IG, said a repeat of those levels is a distinct possibility: “Crude tends to overshoot on both the upside and the downside.” read more

Nigerian output to surge after dodging OPEC cuts

by Bayo Okoya – Delta Analytics Lagos: 8 June 2017

In a boost to Nigerian oil production, Royal Dutch Shell on Tuesday lifted its force majeure on exports of Forcados crude oil shipments. The force majeure, which allows companies to miss contractual obligations as a result of events out of their control, was imposed on 21 February 2016 following militant attacks.

Nigeria was recovering from attacks which had seen its output drop by over a third in 2016 due to militant attacks, from a peak of 2.2 million barrels per day (bpd). With the Forcados terminal back on track, shipments are set to average around 250,000 barrels a day with output will be set to increase by around 10 per cent, bringing the output of Africa’s largest economy up to around 2 million barrels per day (bpd). read more

Shell Canada budget drops by half a billion dollars after oilsands sale

The Canadian Press Published Tuesday, June 6, 2017 2:22PM EDT

CALGARY – The president of Shell Canada says his capital budget will shrink by about half a billion dollars this year following the sale of most of its oilsands assets in a deal that closed last week.

Michael Crothers says it will be about $1.5 billion this year, down from over $2 billion in 2016, but the Canadian branch remains an important part of Royal Dutch Shell’s global operations.

He said in an interview the company’s sale of oilsands assets to Canadian Natural Resources (TSX:CNQ) means it will now concentrate on its shale oil and gas properties in B.C. and Alberta, along with its refining and chemical businesses near Edmonton and its proposed West Coast LNG project. read more

After oilsands divestments, Shell Canada refocuses on gas, chemicals and renewables

Geoffrey Morgan | June 6, 2017 4:27 PM ET
More from Geoffrey Morgan | @geoffreymorgan

Shell Canada President & Country Chair Michael Crothers during an interview in Calgary, Alberta: Photograph by Todd Korol for National Post

CALGARY – Shell Canada Ltd. will soon announce a project to turn vegetable products into diesel fuel in Alberta, as part of the company’s transition to produce less oil and more energy from natural gas, renewables and chemicals.

This follows Shell’s massive US$7.25-billion divestment of its oilsands assets, announced March 9. The company still plans to build an LNG terminal in British Colombia, but no timeline has been set. read more

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