Royal Dutch Shell Group .com Rotating Header Image

Posts Tagged ‘Ben van Beurden’

Shareholders criticise Shell over climate change commitments

Written by

Royal Dutch Shell has been rapped over its climate change commitments, with shareholders criticising its rejection of emissions targets that would bring it in line with the Paris climate accord.

Shareholders at the oil giant’s annual general meeting (AGM) at The Hague spent hours questioning Shell’s board members, who said that while the company supported the Paris agreement, setting company targets was “not in the best interest of the company”.

Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden said his company was making progress in lowering its emissions, but that achieving Paris Climate Agreement goals – which aim to limit global warming to below 2 degrees Celsius from pre-industrial levels – would require broader coordination, including active government support.

read more

Shell CEO says climate change is real, but energy demand growth is ‘unstoppable’

The threat of climate change is real and action is needed, says Ben van Beurden, the chief executive of Royal Dutch Shell.

Ben van Beurden also touched on the oil giant’s transformation, millennials, the new Trump administration and more in a May 17 interview with The Washington Post.

It’s been a turbulent couple of years for the Shell chief executive. With the roller coaster in crude oil prices, the company’s stock has lurched from a high of $83.12 a share six months after he took charge to a low of $36.87 a share. The stock has climbed back, but revenues have plunged by a third since 2013. The shareholders’ annual meeting is Tuesday at The Hague.

read more

SHELL CEO WARNS TRUMP AGAINST BREAKING PARIS CLIMATE DEAL

By Janene Pieters on May 22, 2017 – 11:05

American companies will face detrimental consequences if U.S. president Donald Trump decides to withdraw his country from the Paris climate agreement, Shell CEO Ben van Beurden warned in an interview with British newspaper Financial Times. Van Beurden is one of the first to criticize Trump’s decisions from the business community, which is set to benefit from Trump’s promises of tax cuts and relaxed rules, RTL Nieuws reports.

read more

Shell investors urged to rebel over excessive executive pay

Ben Van Beurden’s total pay and perks for his role as Royal Dutch Shell’s chief executive, rose to €8.6 million for last yearERIC PIERMONT/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Shareholders in Royal Dutch Shell have been urged to oppose “excessive” executive pay after the oil giant awarded its boss a 54 per cent pay rise.

Pirc, the investor group, criticised Shell’s remuneration report, which showed that Ben van Beurden’s total pay and perks rose to €8.6 million for 2016, up from €5.6 million in 2015. Pirc said this was “excessive at 453 per cent of salary” and urged shareholders to vote against the report at the annual general meeting on May 23.

read more

ShareAction urges investors to reject BP, Shell pay policies leftright 2/2leftright

Graphic from a Financial Mail On Sunday article published in Sept 2015

Campaign group ShareAction on Tuesday called for investors to oppose remuneration policies at oil majors BP and Royal Dutch Shell as the policies were not tied closely enough to targets to reduce carbon emissions.

ShareAction said this meant both companies’ plans were misaligned with the interests of long-term shareholders.

ShareAction said it had contacted shareholders at both companies and was helping pension savers to write to their funds about voting down the remuneration policies.

read more

Royal Dutch Shell Takes a Big Step Forward in Its Post-BG Merger Plan This Quarter

 

Tyler Crowe: (TMFDirtyBird) May 5, 2017 at 10:33AM

The investment thesis for Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS-A) (NYSE:RDS-B)radically changed back in 2015, when the company acquired BG Group. The idea of combining these two companies held a lot of promise, but investors would only benefit if management could successfully integrate the company, divest itself of some lower-return businesses, and lower the debt load it took on to get the deal done.

It wasn’t an easy task, but Shell’s most recent couple of earnings reports suggest that management has pulled it off. Here’s a look at its latest earnings release and what management has done recently to get the company one step closer to realizing the potential of that investment thesis laid out a couple of years ago.

read more

Shell to invest $25 billion in Nigeria, other countries

Shell to invest $25 billion in Nigeria, other countries

Oil giant, Royal Dutch Shell, has announced plans to invest about $25 billion this year in Nigeria and all its oil and gas operation across the world.

Shell made the announcement in its first quarter 2017 financial results released on Thursday.

The report revealed that Shell netted an income of $2.2 billion and was expecting to generate $10 billion in cash flow from the delivery of some of its new projects by 2018.

The company recently announced the resumption of oil production at its 225,000 barrels per day (bpd) Bonga Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) field in Nigeria’s deep-waters.

read more

Why I’d Keep Selling Royal Dutch Shell Despite Q1 Profits Bounce

Royston Wild , CONTRIBUTOR: 4 May 2017

Royal Dutch Shell moved away from multi-month lows in Thursday business after announcing a sharp earnings bounceback during the first quarter of the year. The stock was last 1% higher from the midweek close.

Shell — which moved to its cheapest since late November in recent sessions — reported that earnings on a constant cost of supplies (or CCS) basis leapt 315% during January-March, to $3.4bn thanks to a steady recovery in the oil price.

In particular, Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden noted that ‘we saw notable improvements in Upstream and Chemicals, which benefited from improved operational performance and better market conditions.’

read more

Divestment, retooling strategy has paid off, Shell says

Divestment, retooling strategy has paid off, Shell says

By Daniel J. Graeber: May 4, 2017

May 4 (UPI) — A divestment and retooling strategy has paid off considerably with first quarter profits more than doubling on improved oil prices, Royal Dutch Shell said.

Shell joins industry peers like British supermajor BP in declaring a first quarter success. Crude oil prices and market conditions have improved since first quarter 2016, and Shell CEO Ben van Buerden said the debt load was cut in part by a free cash flow of $5.2 billion.

Shell in March announced plans to sell off its entire onshore interests in Gabon to Assala Energy Holdings, part of The Carlyle Group, for $587 million. In the fourth quarter alone, the company unloaded more than $1 billion in assets, in large part from North America. In January, it sold off its interests in a package of assets in the British waters of the North Sea for $3.8 billion.

read more

Shell Pumps a Torrent of Cash as Takeover, Cost Cuts Pay Off

by Rakteem Katakey
4 May 2017, 07:14 BST
4 May 2017, 08:01 BST

Royal Dutch Shell Plc showed it has adapted to a world of lower oil prices, generating a surge in cash flow that allowed it to pay dividends while reducing debt.

The Anglo-Dutch company’s performance helps validate Chief Executive Officer Ben Van Beurden’s $54 billion purchase of BG Group Plc — for which some shareholders complained he overpaid — and the deep spending cuts and asset sales he undertook to protect the balance sheet.

read more

Royal Dutch Shell sees profits jump as oil price rises

4 May 2017

The Anglo-Dutch giant said profits on a current cost of supply measure – which strips out price fluctuations – jumped to $3.4bn (£2.6bn) from $1bn last year.

A 55% rise in oil prices in the first quarter of 2017 compared with a year earlier was the main driver of profits.

Shell joins rivals BP, Exxon Mobil, Chevron and Total in reporting better-than-expected results.

More than $1bn in cost savings and budget cuts made over the past three years from cost-cuts and assets sales have also helped to increase cash flow and boost profits.

read more

Shell claims low-carbon edge

On Monday, reports surfaced that some of Shell’s money circulating in Nigeria was used for payoffs.

April 12 (UPI) — One of the largest oil companies in the world, Royal Dutch Shell said Wednesday it was focused on a low-carbon strategy that was geared toward long-term growth.

Shell highlighted its movement through a changing energy landscape in a sustainability report on activities last year. Chief Executive Officer Ben van Buerden said in the report that lower crude oil prices and a global community coordinated around the U.N.-backed Paris climate agreement meant changes were necessary for the oil and gas business.

read more

Royal Dutch Shell’s CEO Ben van Beurden hails “significant steps” taken to tackle climate change

Written by

The hailed the progress made in recent years, such as the Paris Agreement, as marking a worldwide change in attitude in moving towards a low carbon economy.

In the opening remarks of the supermajor’s sustainability report for 2016, he describes how Shell is working to help meet the world’s growing demand for more and cleaner energy.

In his introduction, van Beurden said: “In 2016, the world took significant steps towards building a low-carbon energy future. The United Nations (UN) Paris Agreement and the UN’s sustainable development goals came into force, setting new targets for tackling climate change, promoting sustainable economic growth and providing access to modern energy.

read more

Shell corruption probe: Top executives knew part of £1.3bn Nigerian oil deal would go to convicted money launderer

In a huge u-turn, the company has now admitted it knew Mr Etete was involved.

Top executives at Shell knew that money they paid as part of a $1.3bn deal for a huge Nigerian oil field would end up in the hands of a convicted money launderer who awarded the asset to his own company when he was oil minister of the country.

Emails seen by The Independent and reported by anti-corruption campaign groups Global Witness and Finance Uncovered, show senior bosses at the UK’s biggest company had been informed that hundreds of millions of dollars could flow through former oil minister Dan Etete to be paid in bribes to former President Goodluck Jonathan and other political figures.

read more

New evidence in Nigeria Corruption Probe: Shell Bosses bribed the oil-minister

Published: Monday, 10 April 2017 18:54

When Shell was buying the OPL 245 oil field in Nigeria for US$1.3 billion, its executives knew that 1.1 billion will land in the pocket of former petroleum minister and convicted money launderer, Dan Etete, media reported Monday.

The BBC claims to have seen emails obtained by anti-corruption charities, Global Witness and Finance Uncovered, which say that Shell representatives were negotiating with Etete for a year before the deal was finalized.

read more

Eni, Shell deny wrongdoing in Nigeria after allegations of improper payment

Oil majors Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) and Eni (ENI.MI) reiterated on Monday that neither they nor their personnel had been involved in any wrongdoing in Nigeria, including improper payments to Nigerian officials.

The comments follow media reports alleging how hundreds of millions of dollars from the two companies were used for illicit payments.

A joint investigation by BuzzFeed News and Italian newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore on Sunday claims to show transactions worth $1.3 billion made in 2010-2011 that Shell and Eni paid to acquire an exploration licence for an offshore oil block known as OPL 245.

read more

What Shell CEO Told Colleague About $1.3 Billion OPL 245 Scandal

What Shell CEO Told Colleague About $1.3 Billion OPL 245 Scandal

Mr. Van Beurden is heard on the intercept warning Henry not to volunteer any information that is not requested if approached by the police and discussing the ramifications for the company’s share price.

By Lionel Faull, Ted Jeory and Nick Mathiason

The boss of one of the world’s biggest corporations was placed under secret surveillance as part of a pan-European corruption investigation into the way the firm paid $1.3 billion for an oil block in Nigeria, explosive documents leaked to Finance Uncovered reveal.

The leak includes a recording of a wiretapped telephone conversation between Shell’s chief executive, Ben van Beurden, and his then chief financial officer, Simon Henry, in the immediate aftermath of a raid by Dutch financial police on the corporation’s headquarters in The Hague.

read more

Union boss hits out over Shell boss’s bumper pay deal

Written by

The huge increase was revealed in the Anglo-Dutch energy giant’s latest annual report, published yesterday.

Mr van Beurden, who took over as chief executive at the start of 2014, received a £9million-plus boost to his pension in his first year – taking total remuneration to £19.5million – followed by a pay package worth about £4million in 2015.

The big payouts coincide with a severe downturn in the oil and gas industry. Shell has already shed more than 1,000 jobs in its North Sea operations alone.

read more

BP slashes CEO Bob Dudley’s pay packet by 40%

Written by Alan Shields – 06/04/2017 11:55 am

The 40% reduction, revealed today in the supermajor’s 2016 annual report, comes after a number of cost-cutting changes, including a 25 per cent reduction in bonuses handed out for hitting targets.

Dudley’s maximum payout under the firm’s long-term incentive plan is to drop from a seven times to five times his basic annual salary of $1.9million.

Last year, around 59% of shareholders opposed Dudley’s $19.4 million pay and benefits package, including his pension.

read more

Royal Dutch Shell strikes deal to offload its Hong Kong LPG business as $30bn sell-off programme rolls on

By Alex Sebastian For This Is Money10:59, 5 April 2017

Royal Dutch Shell has announced a deal to sell its liquefied petroleum gas business in Hong Kong and Macau to DCC Energy for $150.3million as it continues its $30billion asset sales programme.

The Anglo-Dutch oil major has been active in the two locations for close to 60 years and supplies services which help meet the needs of over 100,000 households. The business will continue to operate under the Shell brand.

Shares in Shell responded positively to the news, climbing 1.3 per cent to 2,127p Wednesday. 

read more

Big Oil Vows to Keep Dividends Up as Prices Falter

by Rakteem Katakey: 30 March 2017, 00:01 BST 30 March 2017, 11:40 BST

As they guided Europe’s largest oil companies through the industry’s worst slump in two decades, the bosses of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc had a simple message for investors: we’ll protect the dividend at all costs.

Not everyone is convinced they’ll be able to keep their word. Even after they raised billions of dollars by cutting costs, selling assets and adding debt, cash is pouring out of both companies in the form of hefty shareholder dividends. Yields on those payments — which fell through 2016 as crude started to recover — have risen this year, typically a signal that investors fear a cut in payouts.

read more

Shell sells out of the oilsands. Was it climate or costs?

By Tracy Johnson, CBC News Posted: Mar 09, 2017 4:17 PM ET

Royal Dutch Shell’s deal to sell most of its stake in Alberta’s oilsands was in the works for more than a year, says the company’s chief executive Ben van Beurden.

“We said we would high-grade the portfolio,” he said at the CERAWeek energy conference in Houston.

“We would get out of positions where we do not have the scale or the capability, or that did not fit us in the longer run strategically. And the oilsands is one of them.”

read more

Shell CEO’s plan for a smaller carbon footprint

Patti Domm: 9 March 2017

Royal Dutch Shell‘s announcement of the sale of $7.25 billion in Canadian oil sands assets Thursday is an important step to turning itself into a company of the future — with a broader mix of energy assets and a smaller carbon footprint.

Shell CEO Ben van Beurden said the company is committed to reshaping itself and believes that renewables and new energy will play a bigger role. The company is retaining just 10 percent of its Canadian sands assets.

“We are right in the middle of transforming the company into the company of the future,” he said at the CERAWeek conference in Houston, sponsored by IHS Markit.

read more

Shell cuts debt with US$7.25 billion sale of Canada oil sands

9 March 2017

TORONTO (BLOOMBERG) – Royal Dutch Shell will sell almost all its production assets in Canada’s oil sands in a US$7.25 billion (S$10.24 billion) deal that cuts debt and reduces involvement in one of the most environmentally damaging forms of fossil-fuel extraction.

The company will sell all of its oil-sands interests apart from a 10 per cent stake in the Athabasca Oil Sands mining project, The Hague-based Shell said on Thursday (March 9). It will also continue as operator of the Scotford upgrader and Quest carbon capture and storage project.

read more

Shell’s CEO Van Beurden total pay jumps in 2016

Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) said on Thursday its chief executive Ben Van Beurden saw his total pay jump 60 percent in 2016 to 8.263 million euros from 5.135 million a year earlier mainly due to deferred bonuses and share plans.

Van Beurden’s salary was little changed at 1.460 million euros and his bonus fell to 2.4 million euros from 3.5 million, however, from the company’s long-term incentive plan and deferred bonuses he received 4.381 million euros, up from 163,000 a year earlier.

read more

Shell’s North Sea changing of the guard

Written by Jeremy Cresswell – 06/03/2017 8:50 am

Last month, it emerged that there’s a handover of the helm underway at Shell’s UK Continental Shelf and Ireland business based out of Aberdeen.

After pretty much two years in command, Paul Goodfellow is taking on a new challenge as Shell’s vice president wells based at Rijkswijk in the Netherlands, effective April 1.

Assuming command in Aberdeen is Steve Phimister, who has for the past year been UK “transition lead” for the integration of BG Group’s business into Shell following the successful £36.4billion ($52.6billion) takeover completed early last year.

That Goodfellow should be on the move surprised some in the North Sea community, but this has been a hectic period.

read more

BP, Shell Investor Wants CEO Pay Policy Change After Revolt

by Rakteem Katakey:2 March 2017

The pay of bosses at Europe’s biggest oil companies is back in focus as shareholders prepare to scrutinize BP Plc’s new policy after rejecting Chief Executive Officer Bob Dudley’s remuneration last year.

Allianz Global Investors, among the top 25 holders of BP and Royal Dutch Shell Plc shares, wants the companies to base top executives’ pay and bonuses on per-share metrics rather than absolute numbers for cash flow and profit, said Rohan Murphy, an analyst at the investment firm. This will help align the management with shareholders’ interests and ensure profitability becomes more important, he said.

read more

Hindenburg Memories Cloud Shell’s Vision of Hydrogen Future

by Jess Shankleman

28 February 2017, 00:01 GMT 28 February 2017, 08:27 GMT

Taxi driver Theo Ellis, the first person in Europe to drive Toyota Motor Corp.’s hydrogen-powered Mirai sedan for business, loves telling passengers about the technology that emits nothing but water.

They ask him about its costs, greenness, and the majority inquire about safety. To his passengers, the word “hydrogen” evokes memories of the Hindenburg, the airship that was destroyed in half a minute when it caught fire in 1937, or the H-bomb, a successor to what the U.S. dropped on Japan to end World War II.

read more

Shell Shuns New Oil-Sands Projects as Low Prices Force Cost Control

by Rakteem Katakey: 27 February 2017, 14:52 GMT

Royal Dutch Shell Plc is unlikely to take on new oil-sands projects as it maintains a grip on costs after crude’s crash forced competitors to write down Canadian reserves.

While Shell’s existing oil-sands operations generate strong cash flows, the expense of developing new projects discourages additional investments, Chief Executive Officer Ben Van Beurden said in an interview.

Oil sands, the reserves of heavy crude found primarily in northern Alberta, lured investors in the past decade as oil’s surge above $100 a barrel made the difficult extraction process economic. But they’ve fallen out of favor following the subsequent market collapse as companies dump expensive projects amid fears that competition from low-cost crude could strand costlier assets.

read more

Shell plans Australian solar plants that can switch to gas

MATT CHAMBERS Resources reporter: Melbourne4 Feb 2017

Anglo-Dutch oil giant Shell is looking to invest in Australian solar plants that can switch to gas when needed to deliver baseload power supply as debate rages over renewable energy security in the wake of South Australia’s ­crippling power outages.

Shell, which is Australia’s biggest LNG exporter and one of the world’s largest oil companies, has revealed that Australia was one of three global locations, along with Oman and Brunei, where it was studying pairing renewable energy with gas, after last year flagging “new energies” would be a potential major source of growth for the fossil fuel company beyond 2020.

read more

Shell boss says stop viewing North Sea with ‘nostalgia’

Written by Lindsay Razaq, Westminster Correspondent – 03/02/2017 7:03 am

Shell boss Ben van Beurden today urged against looking at the North Sea with “nostalgia” – insisting plans to sell off assets in the basin do not signal the end of the energy giant’s involvement.

The chief executive conceded the company was streamlining its portfolio.

But he stressed the exit of larger firms from mature positions was positive from a North Sea perspective.

He also said it would give the sector a “new lease of life”.

read more

Shell To Sell Another $5B In Assets, Misses Profit Expectations

By Tsvetana Paraskova – Feb 02, 2017, 3:03 PM CST

Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.A) is making “significant progress” on selling another US$5 billion worth of assets, chief financial officer Simon Henry said on Thursday after the oil supermajor reported 2016 profits below analyst expectations.

Shell’s current cost of supplies (CCS) – a key measure comparable with net income – came in at US$1.8 billion, excluding identified items, compared with US$1.6 billion for the fourth quarter 2015, the company said today. Full-year 2016 CCS earnings attributable to shareholders excluding identified items dropped to US$7.2 billion from US$11.4 billion in 2015.

read more

Royal Dutch Shell is changing, CEO says

By Daniel J. Graeber: Feb. 2, 2017

(UPI) — Royal Dutch Shell continues to focus on an aggressive divestment strategy after cutting $15 billion from its books last year, its CEO said Thursday.

“We are gaining momentum on divestments, with some $15 billion completed in 2016, announced, or in progress, and we are on track to complete our overall $30 billion divestment program as planned,” CEO Ben van Beurden said in a statement.

The Dutch supermajor, trimmed down after a merger last year with British energy company BG Group, reported an 8 percent decline in profit last year for one of its weakest performances in more than a decade.

read more

Shell posts earnings of $3.5 billion in 2016; an 8% slide from $3.8 billion in 2015

Silvia Amaro | @Silvia_Amaro: 2 Feb 2017

Oil major Royal Dutch Shell posted fourth-quarter earnings of $1.0 billion, compared with $1.8 billion for the same quarter a year ago.

Ben van Beurden, chief executive officer of Royal Dutch Shell, said that such earnings figures do not “look good” for investors but he is “very pleased” with the performance for the full year as the company completed its merger with gas utility BG. Shares were 1.5 percent higher in early trade on Thursday.

read more

Royal Dutch Shell’s key earnings fall 44%

The results will disappoint investors who hoped for a stronger show of momentum on the back of higher oil prices and continues the choppy performance by Shell since its $50bn takeover of BG Group completed last year.

FULL FT ARTICLE

Shell boss Ben van Beurden delivered worse than expected full year results

Jillian Ambrose2 FEBRUARY 2017 • 8:55AM

Royal Dutch Shell has dashed investor hopes for a resurgence in profits after reporting disappointing earnings from its exploration and production business.

Europe’s largest oil company was expected to announce full-year profits double those of last year, but instead they fell 8pc to $3.8bn (£2.99bn),  their lowest level in over a decade.

The results came in well below City forecasts. Analysts had been expecting the company to make $8.17bn on a current cost of supplies (CCS) basis, a standard measure of profit in the industry.

read more

Shell finance boss tipped to take over the top job cashed in stock worth £1m days before he suddenly quit

By Rachel Millard For The Daily Mail: 21:58, 15 December 2016 

A finance boss at Royal Dutch Shell who was tipped to take over the top job has suddenly left – just days after he sold stock worth £1million.

Credited with leading the firm’s £41billion takeover of oil and gas group BG last year, Simon Henry was a key lieutenant of chief executive Ben van Beurden.

But the 55-year-old’s departure was announced yesterday to the shock of the markets. Relatively unknown internal finance executive Jessica Uhl has been appointed in his place.

It emerged Henry sold more than £1million of shares on December 1, within 24 hours of the historic Opec deal to cut production that then sent the price of oil soaring.

read more

Shell finance chief to leave company in March

By Karolin Schaps | LONDON

Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) Chief Financial Officer Simon Henry will step down in March after seven years in the post and be replaced by Jessica Uhl, a finance executive in Shell’s gas business.

Henry, a 55-year-old Shell veteran, was one of the executives who oversaw the $54 billion (43.27 billion pound) acquisition of BG Group, which completed in February, and the integration of the gas company which turned Shell into the world’s largest liquefied natural gas (LNG) trader.

read more

Shell picks American former Enron exec for CFO

Royal Dutch Shell executive Jessica Uhl has been elevated to chief financial officer for global operations.

Uhl, the current executive vice president of finance for integrated gas, begins her new post in March and will continue to work at The Hague.  She will replace CFO Simon Henry, who will assist with the transition through June.

Before joining Shell in 2004, Uhl was a director of project development and later a vice president of corporate development for Enron in Houston and Panama.

Uhl also will serve as an executive director of Shell and sit on the executive committee. Shell CEO Ben van Beurden praised Uhl’s promotion.

read more

Shell to replace CFO Simon Henry in March

Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) will replace Simon Henry as chief financial officer on March 9, 2017 with Jessica Uhl, a financial executive in Shell’s gas business, the company said on Thursday.

Henry will remain available to the company until June 30, 2017, Shell said. It gave no reason for his departure.

“Jessica combines an external perspective with broad Shell experience and is a highly regarded executive,” Shell Chief Executive Ben van Beurden said.

Uhl joined Shell in 2004 and was previously employed at Enron and Citibank in the U.S. and Panama.

read more

We Must Harness the Power of Carbon Capture

screen-shot-2016-12-02-at-16-26-47

Ben Van Beurden

Van Beurden is the CEO of Royal Dutch Shell

“To make investments in clean energy technologies more attractive, governments must set an effective price on CO2 emissions”

Nobody can predict the future, but it is highly likely that global energy demand will grow for decades to come. There will be more people on this planet, more people will be living in cities, and more people will be seeking a better life. “A better life” in this context does not mean a tv in every room or a new smartphone every year. It does mean adequate housing, healthcare, sanitation, and modern transport.

read more

Shell ties in bonuses to reinforced emissions strategy

screen-shot-2016-11-14-at-10-17-26

screen-shot-2016-12-02-at-16-00-54

screen-shot-2016-12-02-at-15-59-47

By Ron Bousso and Karolin Schaps | LONDON

Royal Dutch Shell plans to link part of its executive bonuses to greenhouse gas emissions and conduct more active screening of future investments to further efforts to reduce the energy group’s carbon footprint, its CEO told Reuters.

The new initiative by the Anglo-Dutch group comes in response to mounting pressure from investors to adapt to an expected flattening in oil consumption within as little as five years and international plans to phase out fossil fuels by the end of the century to combat global warming.

read more

Shell studying acquisitions in the green energy sector

screen-shot-2016-12-01-at-10-30-43

screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-19-58-01Written by Reporter – 30/11/2016 2:02 pm

Shell said it is studying acquisitions in the green energy sector.

It comes amid shareholder pressure to look at a strategy beyond fossil fuels.

The oil major currently has a market value of $200billion and produces 2% of the world’s oil and gas.

Chief executive Ben Van Beurden said: “The idea you can just be a very clever observer and step in when the moment is right, forget about it.

“I am convinced that in this space we will play an active role, a leafing role and we will plan acquisitions in it.”

read more

Shell CEO expects no valuation hit from climate accord

screen-shot-2016-11-14-at-10-17-26

screen-shot-2016-11-28-at-17-35-30

Royal Dutch Shell expects to pump out all the fossil fuel reserves listed on its balance sheet, its chief executive said, dismissing concerns that production limits in the wake of the Paris climate accord could hit the energy giant’s valuation.

In an interview with Dutch newspaper Het Financieele Dagblad, Ben van Beurden said the issue of “stranded” reserves – deposits in the ground that cannot be used because of carbon emissions limitations – would have no impact on balance sheets.

read more

BvB has truly lost the plot

screen-shot-2016-11-16-at-16-45-13

It is amazing that these “difficult choices” are all falling at the door of the lowest paid employees of Shell and yet the vastly inefficient and “fat” middle and upper level management just seems to keep on expanding.

With such low activity levels due to the transition away from oil and gas, low oil price and smaller geographic focus of Shell one would have thought that these highly paid meeting organisers would face the chop rather than the people doing actual work.

It is sad to say but it seems BvB has truly lost the plot after such a promising start and now tries to dig himself out of his own hubris after so many poor choices prime of which is the overpaying for BG.

read more

Shell to axe 380 finance jobs in Glasgow in favour of cheaper offices overseas

screen-shot-2016-11-16-at-15-49-52

By Emily Gosden, energy editor: 16 NOVEMBER 2016 • 1:38PM

Royal Dutch Shell is to axe 380 jobs in Glasgow as it shuts its only UK finance operations office in favour of cheaper locations in Poland, India, South Africa, Malaysia and the Philippines.

The oil giant’s announcement that it plans to close its Bothwell Street office in the city as part of its cost-cutting drive brings the total number of jobs shed from its UK operations over the past 18 months to more than 1,350.

Staff in the Glasgow office, who undertake back-office administrative tasks such as processing invoices and managing travel and expenses, face “involuntary severance” as Shell moves their work to other offices in its “global Shell Business Operations network”.

read more

Shell to sell off Norway oilfields

screen-shot-2016-11-13-at-18-10-08

screen-shot-2016-11-13-at-18-08-24

screen-shot-2016-11-13-at-18-11-11

screen-shot-2016-10-20-at-23-00-27Shell has lined up the investment bank Rothschild to conduct a review of its $3bn Norwegian division: MATS ANDA/GETTY IMAGES

Danny Fortson: November 13 2016,

Shell is considering a sale of part or all of its $3bn Norwegian business as Britain’s biggest company comes under growing investor pressure to pay down debt from its blockbuster takeover of rival BG.

The oil titan has lined up the investment bank Rothschild to conduct a review of the division, which operates several large fields in the Norwegian North Sea and has smaller stakes in many others.

read more

Shell to invest $10 billion as Brazil expands private role in oil industry

screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-19-27-20

screen-shot-2016-11-11-at-11-10-31

screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-19-58-01Royal Dutch Shell Plc (RDSa.L) will invest $10 billion (8 billion pounds) in Brazil over five years now that the country has increased opportunities for foreign companies in its oil industry, its chief executive officer said on Thursday.

Already the largest foreign investor in Brazil, Shell is particularly encouraged by recent legislation that increases the role of private oil companies in the tapping of vast off-shore oil deposits in the subsalt layer, Chief Executive Officer Ben van Beurden said.

read more

Oil chiefs under fire over ‘pathetic’ new climate investment fund

Screen Shot 2016-09-07 at 14.28.11

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-20-09-08

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-20-26-48

Emily Gosden, energy editor: 4 NOVEMBER 2016 • 7:53PM

Oil giants including BP and Shell have been pilloried by climate campaigners after disclosing their annual contributions to a much-hyped new green investment fund would be less than BP chief Bob Dudley earned last year.

Mr Dudley and Royal Dutch Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden were among industry heavyweights who appeared at an event in London to announce plans by the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI) to invest $1bn in “innovative low emissions technologies” over the next ten years.

read more

Shell, Total CEOs Question Solar in Room Full of Solar Investors

screen-shot-2016-10-13-at-10-39-14

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-09-52-10

screen-shot-2016-10-16-at-09-04-40

By Anna Hirtenstein: 3 November 2016

When executives from some of the world’s biggest oil companies question the ability of solar energy to make money in a roomful of renewables investors, awkwardness ensues.

That’s what happened Thursday at the Energy for Tomorrow conference in Paris, where the chief executive officers of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and Total SA said solar power isn’t profitable.

“Growth of renewables has been remarkable but capacity of industry to make money in that segment has been remarkably absent,’’ Shell CEO Ben van Beurden said during a panel discussion. “The 10 largest solar companies collectively never paid a cent of dividends.’’

read more

%d bloggers like this: