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Posts Tagged ‘Alternative Energy’

Shell to Expand Presence in Asia and Alternative Fuel Market

September 20, 2017, 01:35:00 PM EDT By Zacks Equity Research,

Per Reuters, integrated oil and gas company, Royal Dutch Shell plc RDS.Aintends to increase its marketing operations in Asia region. The company’s effort to de-carbonize the energy system was reconfirmed as it targets to attain 20% of its global fuel station sales from electric vehicles recharging and fuels with a lower level of carbon by 2025.

Expanding Asia Operations

The oil major has 43,000 fuel stations in 80 countries and is now trying to reach the fuel markets of China and India, the two most populous countries in the world with high demand for energy. Shell is also eyeing the Indonesian fuel market. The company believes there will be continued growth in the Asian market over the next decade. read more

Oil firm Shell planning to open its first UK electric car charging point next month

Oil firm Shell is planning to open its first UK electric car charging point next month.

Cars will be able to re-charge at a yet-to-be disclosed location in London.

Bosses are trying to adapt as transport and other industries move away from fossil fuels. Demand for electric cars is expected to soar, with about 150m on the roads by 2040.

Shell expects to open around 10 electric charging points around London by the end of the year. More will follow depending on customer demand. The firm ultimately wants 20 per cent of its retail fuel margins globally to come from non-diesel or petrol cars. read more

Oil Majors Cut Greenhouse Gas Pollution

By Foster Wong: 18 September 2017

Big Oil had started fighting climate change before President Donald Trump took office read more

Shell Targets Alternative Fuel Stations

By Tsvetana Paraskova – Sep 12, 2017, 12:30 PM CDT

Shell—one of the oil majors that is increasingly betting on natural gas and low-carbon fuels—is targeting 20 percent of its global fuel station sales to come from electric vehicles recharging and low-carbon fuels by 2025, John Abbott, Downstream Director at Shell, told Reuters in an interview published on Tuesday.

While Shell plans to expand fuel stations in China, India, and Mexico—where it sees growth in this market over the next decade—it would continue to focus on meeting demand for cars running on fuels alternative to gasoline and diesel, Abbott said. read more

Shell eyes Asia, aims to expand vehicle recharging at fuel stations

SEPTEMBER 12, 2017

* Shell is world’s biggest fuel station operator

* Pilot projects to recharge cars in Europe, California

* Company sees fossil fuel growth in China, India, Mexico

* Focus on downstream earnings as crude price falls 

By Ron Bousso and Dmitry Zhdannikov

LONDON, Sept 12 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell aims to expand marketing operations in Asia and wants 20 percent of sales from its fuel stations worldwide to come from recharging electric vehicles and low carbon fuels by 2025, as the world shifts away from crude.

The Anglo-Dutch firm, with 43,000 fuel stations in 80 countries, aims to expand in China and India, as well as Mexico, where it sees fossil fuel growth in the next decade, John Abbott, the head of refining, trading and marketing, told Reuters. read more

Shell’s defence of big oil is too hopeful

September 11, 2017, 11:40:00 AM EDT By Reuters

By Andy Critchlow

LONDON, Sept 11 (Reuters Breakingviews) – Royal Dutch Shell, looking deeply into its crystal ball, sees a future that’s still heavily dependent on oil. The Anglo-Dutch giant expects crude will continue to play a major role in global energy supply for decades, even in its less oil-friendly scenario. That optimism goes someway to justifying the billions of dollars it continues to invest in exploiting new reserves and expanding its fuel network. But it’s also a view that may place too much faith in the combustion engine – and China staying with its current strategy. read more

General Motors, Disney, Shell and 1,200 other companies are taking steps to fight climate change, report says

September 12 at 12:01 AM

More than 1,200 global businesses, including U.S. companies such as Disney, Shell and General Motors, are moving to embrace a carbon price — even if President Trump isn’t, according to a new report by a Washington climate think tank.

While the president has suggested that tackling climate change will undermine the economy and hamstring  businesses, chief executives have been busy voluntarily putting a price on their own carbon dioxide emissions. read more

Shell Retail Looks to the Future With Car Charging, Clean Fuels

A Mirai hydrogen fuel powered automobile, manufactured by Toyota Motor Corp., sits on the forecourt at Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s first U.K. hydrogen refueling station in Cobham, U.K., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Shell, crafting a strategy to wean itself off oil, is expanding its operations in the refueling market for hydrogen cars. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg Rakteem Katakey, Javier Blas: BloombergSeptember 11, 2017

Royal Dutch Shell Plc wants 20 percent of income from its retail forecourts to come from vehicles that don’t burn diesel or gasoline, as the company anticipates an accelerating transition to clean energy over the coming decade. 

Shell set up its first hydrogen refueling station in the U.K. earlier this year and will install its first electric car charging point later this month, said John Abbott, the top executive of its downstream business, which includes refining, marketing, retail, trading and chemicals. By 2025, he expects these new operations supplying cleaner fuels, including natural gas, to make up a fifth of retail earnings. read more

Shell’s long view

By Ed Crooks: Sunday September 10, 2017

Royal Dutch Shell this week set out its views on the outlook over the next few decades, in presentations to investors in New York and London. Shell has been thinking deeply for decades about how to model the future. The scenarios it sets out are more explicit about the uncertainties involved than other projections, which sometimes seem to imply that we can be confident oil consumption in 2040 will be 110.8m barrels per day, or with other overly precise figures. read more

Global shockwaves from electric cars will be here sooner rather than later

Shift in power. Illustration: David Simonds/Observer

Governments, the oil industry and car makers are waking up to the profound changes battery-powered cars will bring

Sunday 10 September 2017

Last week, Shell argued that the fuel savings from the efficiency improvements in internal combustion engines would outweigh those from electric vehicles threefold. The Anglo-Dutch company believes oil demand will not peak until the mid-2030s, despite expecting electric and plug-in hybrids cars to make up 35% of new car sales by then, up from 1% now. “To come radically earlier than the early 2030s [peak oil demand], there has to somehow be a demand change, and it’s not going to come from electric cars,” said Guy Outen, Shell’s executive vice-president of strategy and portfolio. But the company’s actions may tell a different story… FULL ARTICLE read more

Shell criticises proposed future bans of non-electric cars

by: Andrew Ward, Energy Editor: 8 Sept 2017

A ban on petrol and diesel vehicles would be counterproductive if it undermines the development of more fuel-efficient engines, Royal Dutch Shell has said, while urging policymakers to let markets determine the best way to tackle climate change. Guy Outen, head of strategy for Shell, said the Anglo-Dutch oil and gas group supported those aims but said governments should not “pick winners” among green technologies.
Shell’s argument will be seen by many as self-serving… FT ARTICLE read more

Shell Expects Australia Gas Shortage to Trigger Export Restriction

The world’s second-biggest liquefied natural gas exporting nation will probably curb shipments next year to avoid a domestic shortfall of the fuel, according to the Australian head of Royal Dutch Shell Plc.

The Australian Energy Market Operator will probably declare a shortage for eastern states in the next two to four weeks, Shell Australia Chairwoman Zoe Yujnovich said at a Bloomberg event Wednesday in Sydney. That would trigger the country’s domestic gas security mechanism, a policy announced in June that could limit LNG exports from plants that draw more gas from local markets than they supply. read more

Shell Invests to Boost Global Gas Demand

Europe’s biggest energy company is investing in projects to boost global gas demand and aims to continue feeding the market it’s nurturing with new liquefied natural gas export plants.

Royal Dutch Shell Plc is supporting the development of gas use in heavy transport such as shipping and is also helping smaller and less credit worthy customers begin importing LNG, Maarten Wetselaar, the company’s director of integrated gas and new energies, said at an event at Bloomberg’s Sydney office Wednesday. As new LNG customers enter the market, that will open a window for Shell and others to develop new low-cost export plants. read more

Shell’s Ben van Beurden: Oil vs Uber in the battle of reputations

In a throwaway comment, Ben van Beurden found himself front and centre on the national media’s radar. “It wasn’t a planned remark, it just came out,” he said.

Written by

But it wasn’t oil price, or strategy that landed him prime time interviews.

Instead, it was the comment that his next car would be electric.

“It wasn’t a planned remark, it just came out,” he said.

“But it shows how charismatic renewables and electricity is at the moment, much more charismatic than gas and definitely much more charismatic than oil.”

A perception that oil and gas have a shrinking role to play is one the industry needs to address head-on. read more

INTERVIEW-Electric cars and renewables not enough to meet Paris climate goal – consultant

Despite the rise in renewable energy, it is gas that will overtake oil as the world’s biggest energy source by 2034… This thinking underpinned, for example, Royal Dutch Shell’s $54 billion takeover of BG Group last year.

* World will miss Paris target under current projections

* Energy demand seen peaking around 2030

* Electricity output to rise 140 pct by 2050 

* Gas to overtake oil as main energy source by 2034

By Karolin Schaps

ARNHEM, The Netherlands, Sept 5 (Reuters) – The cost of electric vehicles (EVs) will fall to match those running on combustion engines by 2022, a key trigger that will mean by 2035 half of all passenger vehicles sold globally will be electric, according to the head of a top energy consultancy. read more

Big Oil to be usurped by gas in little more than a decade, experts warn

Jillian Ambrose: 

THE dominance of Big Oil will be usurped in less than two decades by the dawn of a golden age for natural gas lasting at least until the middle of the century.

One of the world’s biggest risk assurance experts in the global energy ­industry has predicted that gas will emerge as the world’s most important source of energy by the mid 2030s ­after a slow descent for oil which will peak within ten years and the ongoing decline of coal. read more

Shell to build world’s largest hydrogen plant of its kind in Germany

Written by

The project, with ITM Power, will take shape at the Wesseling site of the Rhineland refinery.

With a capacity of ten megawatts, it would be the largest plant of its kind in Germany and the largest PEM (polymer electrolyte membrane) electrolysis in the world.

In addition to the production of hydrogen, the technology could also contribute to the stabilization of the electricity grid with an increasing share of irregularly available renewable energies in the energy mix. read more

What You Missed in Royal Dutch Shell plc’s Quarterly Report

Global energy giant Royal Dutch Shell hinted at how one number, over time, could change the future of the company

Reuben Gregg Brewer: (TMFReubenGBrewer): Sep 1, 2017 at 9:16AM Royal Dutch Shell plc (NYSE:RDS-A) (NYSE:RDS-B) is one of the world’s largest integrated oil majors. It competes with the likes of ExxonMobil, Chevron, and Total. It recently doubled down on the energy business with a $50 billion acquisition. But while it’s working to pay off the debt it took on to get that deal done, CEO Ben van Beurden made an interesting statement about the future that you may have missed in the numbers of Shell’s quarterly report.

What Shell looks like now

There’s no question about how Royal Dutch Shell makes money. It is one of the world’s largest oil and natural gas drillers, with a large footprint in liquified natural gas. Oil and gas have been the driving force, broadly speaking, throughout all of the company’s over 100-years of existence. Investor questions generally focus on what management is doing to support and grow its core operations.

In the first half of the year that included capital spending of roughly $11.5 billion. The goal for the year is for capital spending of between $25 and $30 billion. Right now management expects to be toward the low-end of that range. That range, meanwhile, is the goal every year from now until 2020. read more

Shell Joins Solar Push in Coal Country of World’s Top Exporter

Royal Dutch Shell Plc is investigating a solar power project in an Australian region better known for its fossil fuels, particularly coal.

The company is studying the feasibility of a solar development on its land in the Western Downs area of Queensland, which is subject to a final investment decision, a spokeswoman said by email. Though Shell’s statement didn’t elaborate on timing or size, the regional council this week said it had approved construction of the 250-megawatt Delga Solar Farm project proposed by Shell at Woleebee, near Wandoan. read more

Up to 800 possible jobs for solar farm which has been given green light

Up to 800 possible jobs for solar farm which has been given green light

POWER FROM THE SUN: An example of a large-scale solar farm.

The Delga Solar Farm will be the project of Shell Australia, subsidiary of multi-national oil giant Royal Dutch Shell.

THE Western Downs is keeping up its want to be Australia’s “energy capital” as it has approved the development application for the eighth solar farm project in the region yesterday morning.

The 250MW Delga Solar Farm will be built 25km south-west of Wandoan. This continues the prominence of Wandoan in the region, adding to the largest solar farm in Australia to be built in the area, as well as the approval for a new coal mine. read more

Big Oil Follows Silicon Valley Into Backing Green Energy Firms

Oil majors quietly investing into new technology start-ups

‘Disruptive power’ from small companies prompts Shell to move

Major oil companies are joining Silicon Valley in backing energy-technology start-ups, a signal that that those with the deepest pockets in the industry are casting around for a new strategy.

From Royal Dutch Shell Plc to Total SA and Exxon Mobil Corp., the biggest investor-owned oil companies are dribbling money into ventures probing the edge of energy technologies. The investments go beyond wind and solar power into projects that improve electricity grids and brew new fuels from renewable resources. read more

Shell and Exxon face censure over claim gas was ‘cleanest fossil fuel’

The Dutch advertising watchdog will on Tuesday censure Shell and Exxon for claiming that natural gas was “the cleanest of all fossil fuels” in an advert earlier this year. It will be the second time this summer that the Netherlands advertising standards board has ruled against the fossil fuels industry… FULL ARTICLE 

Shell Prepares For A Different Energy Reality

: 14 August 2017

Summary

  • This summer has seen the governments of several of the world’s major economies propose to eliminate internal combustion engine vehicles over the next 10-30 years.
  • At the same time, Royal Dutch Shell announced several major clean energy investments over the summer in anticipation of a drop-off in petroleum demand.
  • This article looks at how Shell’s clean energy investments fit into its energy profile forecasts compared to its peers.

This summer has been filled with the sort of headlines that can give strategic planners in the petroleum & gas sector heartburn. One-upping Germany’s earlier non-binding pledge to ban new internal combustion engine [ICE] vehicles by 2030, the government of France’s new centrist president Emmanuel Macron announced in early July that the country will end sales of ICE vehicles by 2040. This move, which is part of that country’s efforts to comply with its greenhouse gas emission reduction target under 2015’s Paris Climate Agreement, would eliminate gasoline- and diesel-only engines and is aimed at reducing the country’s air pollution as it is at mitigating climate change. Britain intends to do the same by 2050. Even China and India, which have long been posited as important future sources of petroleum demand, are moving to electrify their vehicle fleets: China recently announced that it wants 25% of the country’s vehicles to be “alternative fuel” by 2025, while India is drafting plans to electrify all of its vehicles by 2030. read more

Equis Is Said to Seek Binding Bids for $4 Billion Power Assets

Equis Energy, the Singapore-based developer of power projects, has asked for binding bids for its $4 billion renewable energy business by late September, people with knowledge of the matter said.

A consortium led by I Squared Capital is among suitors chosen to proceed in the bidding for the portfolio of Asia Pacific assets, according to the people. The infrastructure investment firm is partnering with Thai utility Electricity Generating Pcl and Japanese trading house Mitsubishi Corp., the people said, asking not to be identified because the information is private. read more

Exxon Knew, Shell Knew, They All Knew

08/09/2017 07:17 am ET

In 2015, the Union of Concerned Scientists published its landmark exposé“The Climate Deception Dossiers,” which show that not only Exxon, but also Shell, BP, ConocoPhillips, Chevron and coal giant Peabody Energy were aware of the climate change reality since the 70s. Even so, through special interest groups, they invested tens of millions “to sow doubt and promote contrarian arguments they knew to be wrong.”

The fuel that powers this planetary sabotage is called greed. The fossil fuel industry worldwide has accumulated stratospheric levels of wealth over the decades. Moreover, according to a report just published by World Development, in 2015, fossil fuels received a staggering $5.3 trillion in subsidies around the world. This includes not only taxpayer money but also the costs of deaths caused by pollution and these fuels’ contribution to the climate crisis. read more

Shell invests in Singapore solar firm Sunseap; eyes solar projects

Reuters Staff: AUGUST 1, 2017 / 11:18 AM

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell has invested in Singapore-based solar firm Sunseap Group for an undisclosed sum as part of a planned collaboration on solar projects in the Asia-Pacific region, the companies said on Tuesday.

Shell declined to reveal the amount invested by Shell Technology Ventures, the company’s corporate venturing arm.

Privately held Sunseap Group has about 160 megawatts of distributed solar contracts in Singapore, holds an electricity retailer license and has secured utility scale solar projects in the region, the two companies said. read more

European oil majors seek to harness U.S. offshore wind

Karolin Schaps and Susanna Twidale: AUGUST 1, 2017 / 10:34 AM

LONDON (Reuters) – Some European oil majors have made inroads into the emerging U.S. offshore wind energy market, aiming to leverage their experience of deepwater development and the crowded offshore wind arena at home.

Late entrants to the offshore wind game in Europe, which began with a project off Denmark 25 years ago and is now approaching maturity, they are looking across the Atlantic at what they view as a huge and potentially lucrative new market. read more

OPEC’s Existential Sucker Punch

Julian Lee: July 30, 2017 3:00 AM EDT

You wait decades for an existential crisis, then two come along at once. At least that’s how it must feel for OPEC’s beleaguered ministers. In the short term the market for their oil is being eroded by rising production outside their control. Looking further ahead, oil demand itself is under threat from the electrification of road transport. OPEC may not yet be dead, but its days are surely numbered.

The most obvious short-term threat to the group comes from the rapid rise in U.S. shale oil, but the risks have expanded to include other areas like Brazil’s prolific sub-salt discoveries and more recent finds further north along the east coast of South America. read more

The electric jolt that roused Big Oil

Jillian Ambrose: 

Identifying a tipping point is not always easy. But when one of the world’s most powerful oil bosses says he is in the market for an electric car, there can be little doubt.

Ben van Beurden, the Royal Dutch Shell boss, last week delivered the clearest indication yet that the burgeoning electric vehicle industry is already hastening the decline of global oil demand. “When that will be is not certain. But that it will happen, we are certain,” he told investors. read more

Shell CEO Ben Van Beurden says his next car will be an electric Mercedes S500e


Jul 28 2017 at 9:03 AM

When the boss of Europe’s biggest listed oil company says his next car will be electric, it says a lot about the future of fossil fuels.

Royal Dutch Shell responded to the worst oil-price crash in a generation with its $US54 billion ($68 billion) takeover of BG Group, betting that demand for natural gas will rise as the world shifts to cleaner-burning fuels. Now chief executive officer Ben Van Beurden says the next thing he’ll buy is a car that doesn’t depend on either oil or gas to run. read more

Shell preparing for world economy that shifts away from oil

By DANICA KIRKA Associated Press

Royal Dutch Shell is planning for the day when demand for oil starts fading as major economies move away from oil and increasingly turn to electric-powered cars, Chief Executive Ben van Beurden said Thursday.

Van Beurden welcomed recent proposals to phase out passenger vehicles powered by fossil fuels in Britain and France, saying they are needed to combat global warming. Shell is looking at “very aggressive scenarios” as it makes plans to remain competitive in a world that gets more of its energy from renewable sources and less from crude oil, or “liquids,” he said. read more

Shell Wakes Up and Smells the Coffee (and Burgers)

July 27, 2017 12:23 PM EDT

The image of a driver slurping an iced latte while pulling a Mustang up to the drive-in window of a fast-food joint is either your idea of a capitalist apotheosis or civilization’s decadent demise.

Or … it’s what flashed through your mind as you listened to Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s earnings call on Thursday.

Jessica Uhl, Shell’s chief financial officer, at one point talked up the oil major’s marketing business:

We’re the world’s largest fuel retailer. Every day, Shell serves more than 30 million customers across our 43,000 sites in close to 80 countries. That is more sites than Starbucks; it is more than McDonald’s. read more

Report: Gas could be sidelined by renewables in parts of Australia

Royal Dutch Shell, meanwhile, announced its Prelude vessel, a first-of-a-kind ship designed to process LNG off the coast of Western Australia, arrived at its destination after leaving a South Korean shipyard in June. With LNG emerging in market share because of its diverse deliverability options, Shell said the Prelude floating LNG vessel opens up new export opportunities.

By Daniel J. Graeber: 26 July 2017

July 26 (UPI) — With Australia monitoring natural gas demand, a consultant group found gas-fired power could get squeezed out in parts of the country as renewables get cheaper.

A research project from Wood Mackenzie, in coordination with GTM Research, found that wind, solar and battery costs might decline enough to the point that, by 2025, they’re competitive with gas-powered plants. For batteries in particular, whose costs are expected to decline by as much as 50 percent over the next decade, the researchers found storage capacity will be enough to meet the region’s peak residual demand. read more

Shell, SoftBank Weigh Bids for Asia Renewables Firm Worth Up to $5 Bln – Sources

SINGAPORE — Royal Dutch Shell and SoftBank are among several global groups considering bidding for Equis Energy, Asia’s largest independent renewable energy producer valued at up to $5 billion (3.84 billion pounds), sources familiar with the matter said.

Japanese trading companies, global pension funds and buyout firms are also in the fray to buy Singapore-based Equis, the sources said, at a time when many Asian governments are expanding the use of renewable power and its costs are falling. read more

Investors Squeezing Oil & Gas Developers To Cut Methane

Investors Squeezing Oil & Gas Developers To Cut Methane

, I write about the global energy business.: July 20, 2017: Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

Oil and gas developers may soon be feeling the effects of a one-two punch — an adverse court ruling dealing with their methane emissions and now an investor-led initiative pushing them to be more transparent.

Natural gas, of course, has become the fuel of choice — a fuel that markets itself as far less pollutive than coal. But methane is its main component, which is 84 times more potent than CO2, although its lifespan is 20 years compared to 100. Indeed, methane makes up about 25% of the global warming today. read more

Shell Oil recently left the Corrib gas field with losses of 2 billion

Opinion: ‘Just one week after banning fracking, we started drilling for oil’

We need a just transition to a low carbon economy, not a sell-off of our future, write Sinead Mercier and Louise Michelle Fitzgerald.

IN AN ORWELLIAN twist of double-speak, on 11 July, just one week after onshore fracking was banned in Ireland, Minister of Communications, Climate Action and Environment Denis Naughten granted consent to Providence Resources PLC to commence drilling for oil in the Porcupine Basin off our south-west coast.

If catastrophic climate change is to be avoided, existing fossil fuels must be kept in the ground. Providence Resources states that they expect to find 5 billion barrels of oil.

As George Orwell wrote in 1984, “doublethink means the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one’s mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them”. read more

Shell to operate fast charging at selected Shell stations in the Netherlands and in the United Kingdom

Shell and Allego are working together to install and operate the first fast chargers for electric vehicles at selected Shell service stations. The project will include selected charging sites at Shell stations in the United Kingdom and in The Netherlands. The goal is that fast chargers are expected to be operational at all selected locations by the end of 2017. The first chargers are due to open in Greater London, Derby and the western part of the Netherlands (Randstad). read more

Aramco IPO: How It Will Stack Up Against Exxon & Shell

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As Saudi Aramco’s much hyped IPO approaches, the company’s most recent annual review, released last week, provides insight into its strategic direction. Aramco has positioned itself to be accepted by investors as a major international oil company (IOC) and as a globally diversified energy enterprise with integrated downstream and sales operations around the world. Currently, Aramco is a national oil company (NOC), owned by the government. But upon its expected public offering of shares, it will join the ranks of other major IOCs. read more

Energy transition chatter should go beyond Western viewpoints, says Shell CEO

Don’t be tone deaf to energy transition concerns of emerging economies, Ben van Beurden tells the World Petroleum Congress.

By in Istanbul, Turkey: July 11, 2017 08:02 BST

Discussions over the global energy mix and the transition to a low carbon global economy should not only focus on Western perspectives, according to Royal Dutch Shell’s chief executive officer Ben van Beurden.

Speaking at the 22nd World Petroleum Congress in Istanbul, Turkey, van Beurden said “too often” energy transition is considered from the perspective of the European or the North American end-user.

“And it is true, that these areas of the world have a historical responsibility for the greenhouse gases in our atmosphere which translates into a responsibility to act today. read more

It’s a world of worry for oil companies

By Ryan Maye Handy: 8 July 2017

India hopes to sell only electric vehicles by 2030. China is offering incentives to buy electric cars and investing heavily in renewable technologies. Volvo will scrap the pure internal combustion engine in favor of hybrids and electric cars.

And on Thursday, France announced it plans to ban the sale of diesel and gasoline-fueled cars by 2040.

The world’s major oil companies might disagree when global demand for petroleum will peak, but the news of the past seven months suggests that they should be worried, if they aren’t already. Nations, states and private companies are demanding cleaner energy, leaving the world’s oil producers to face a reckoning that many haven’t yet accepted. read more

Shell acquires local power company MP2

By Ryan Maye Handy: 29 June 2017

Royal Dutch Shell said Thursday that it plans to acquire MP2 Energy, a power and retail electric company based in the Woodlands, as the oil major seeks to diversify its business.

The transaction, if approved by regulators, would expand Shell’s electricity business beyond the West Coast into Texas, the Midwest and the East Coast. MP2, which manages power plants and runs a retail electric business, serves mostly industrial and commercial customers. In Texas, however, it offers residential electric plans for customers, including a program with rooftop solar systems. The company also operates in Illinois, Ohio and Pennsylvania. read more

Shell Welcomes Final Recommendations in Climate Report

by  Rigzone Staff: Thursday, June 29, 2017

Royal Dutch Shell plc has welcomed the final recommendations set out in a report published Thursday by the Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD). 

“I agree that companies should be clear about how they plan to be resilient in the face of climate change and energy transition,” Shell CEO Ben van Beurden said in a company statement.

“I believe it is right that it should be transparent which companies are truly on firm foundations over the long-term. I applaud the task force for its work to achieve this aim and I have signed a letter confirming Shell’s support for the initiative,” he added. read more

Shell Energy North America Signs Purchase Agreement To Acquire MP2 Energy LLC

HOUSTON, June 29, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Shell Energy North America (“SENA”) announced today that it has signed a purchase agreement for the acquisition of MP2 Energy LLC (MP2). Subject to regulatory approvals, the transaction is expected to be closed in the 3rd quarter of 2017.

Through self-developed proprietary systems and technology, MP2 provides market based solutions to commercial and industrial customers for managing energy supply, load, and generation.  MP2 is unique in its skill set and at the front of the curve when it comes to developing fit for purpose solutions to its customers, which face ever more complicated energy choices. read more

Shell boss backs G20 call to come clean on climate risks

Jillian Ambrose: 

Royal Dutch Shell boss Ben Van Beurden has joined over 100 major companies to back calls from a G20 taskforce for the world’s largest companies to come clean on the financial impact of climate change.

The task force, set up by the G20’s Financial Stability Board (FSB), is chaired by Michael Bloomberg and aims to cast a light on climate-related financial risk to avoid incubating a future global market shocks by mis-pricing companies and assets. read more

Shell Signs Agreement for biofuel technology

CALGARY, June 27, 2017 /CNW/ – Royal Dutch Shell plc, through its subsidiary Shell International Exploration and Production B.V. (“Shell”), and SBI BioEnergy Inc. have reached an agreement granting Shell exclusive development and licensing rights for SBI’s biofuel technology. Edmonton-based SBI has a patented process that can convert a wide range of waste oils, greases and sustainable vegetable oils into lower carbon drop-ins for diesel, jet fuel and gasoline. Under the agreement, Shell and SBI will work together to demonstrate the potential of the technology and, if successful, scale up for commercial application. read more

Shell in clean energy race

It wants to be leader in the business and establish itself across full value chain of renewables, alternative energies

Royal Dutch Shell aims to be a leader in clean energy and sees an opportunity in using its global presence and established brand to scale up the new energies business quickly as and when. PHOTO: REUTERS

ROYAL Dutch Shell aims to be a leader in clean energy and sees an opportunity in using its global presence and established brand to scale up the new energies business quickly as and when.

The second largest-publicly traded oil company in the world also plans on establishing itself across the full value chain of renewables and alternative energies as it has done for oil, said a senior executive in the firm. read more

Exxon, BP and Shell back carbon tax proposal to curb emissions

Exxon, BP and Shell back carbon tax proposal to curb emissions

Oliver Milman: Tuesday 20 June 2017

In a full-page newspaper ad on Tuesday, the companies called for a “consensus climate solution that bridges partisan divides, strengthens our economy and protects our shared environment”. Exxon and the others were listed as founding members of the plan… “ExxonMobil will try to dress this up as climate activism, but its key agenda is protecting executives from legal accountability for climate pollution and fraud,” said Naomi Ages, senior climate campaigner at Greenpeace USA. “A nicely worded public relations exercise is no cure for decades of deception.” read more

Shell Sees Ability to Manage Risk Giving Edge in Offshore Wind

Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Europe’s most valuable oil company, expects its expertise in managing risk will make it a market leader in developing the clean-energy industry.

Offshore wind projects are attracting billions of dollars of investment and will become “the energy backbone” for European countries from Germany to the U.K., said Mark Gainsborough, Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s head of new energies. 

Oil companies have a natural advantage in that business, since they have spent decades learning how to manage financial, political and project-development risks, he said. That gives them an edge over renewable energy developers, who prefer to pin down long-term power-purchase agreements or government support before moving forward. As the renewables industry shifts to more subsidy-free projects, it may be the established oil companies that can handle the gambles that come with competing at market prices. read more

Shell: step up building huge North Sea offshore wind farms

June 9, 2017

Wind energy not only has the potential to develop into the most important sustainable energy source, but it is also the cheapest means of generating power, according to Mark Gainsborough, head of Royal Dutch/Shell’s new energy division.

Gainsborough said the current generation of North Sea wind farms are too small. Speaking at a wind energy meeting in London earlier this week, he made a plea for larger cross-border offshore wind projects, the Financieele Dagblad said on Friday. read more

Shell still working to reduce emissions despite U.S. pullout from Paris agreement

President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of the Paris climate agreement Thursday, but one of the largest companies in the world said it will still do its part to provide clean energy.

Shell Chemicals, which is building a $6 billion ethane cracker plant along the Ohio River in Potter Township, said Thursday that the company’s “position on climate change and the importance of the Paris agreement is well known.” read more

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