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Posts Tagged ‘Alternative Energy’

Shift to Hydrogen Could Meet 20% of World Energy Needs by 2050

Shell, Statoil and BMW among companies urging support for fuel

Transition requires investment of up to $25 billion a year

The most abundant element may supply almost a fifth of global energy by 2050 and eliminate enough emissions to cancel out all the pollution in the U.S., according to a group of industrial companies from Royal Dutch Shell Plc to Toyota Motor Corp.

Fuel-cell vehicles running on hydrogen, extracted from water using wind and solar power, may be used to power everything from cars to factories, according to the Hydrogen Council, a group that also includes the German automaker BMW AG, the mining giant Anglo American Plc and the French energy company Engie SA. The group estimated hydrogen has the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by about 6 gigatons a year, more than the 5.5 gigatons the U.S. released in 2016. read more

Peak oil? Majors aren’t buying into the threat from renewables

Ernest Scheyder, Ron Bousso: NOVEMBER 8, 2017 HOUSTON/LONDON (Reuters) – Two decades ago, BP set out to transcend oil, adopting a sunburst logo to convey its plans to pour $8 billion over a decade into renewable technologies, even promising to power its gas stations with the sun.

That transformation – marketed as “Beyond Petroleum” – led to manufacturing solar panels in Australia, Spain and the United States and erecting wind farms in the United States and the Netherlands.

Today, BP (BP.L) might be more aptly branded “Back to Petroleum” after exiting or scaling back its renewable energy investments. Lower-cost Chinese components upended its solar panel business, which the firm shed in 2011. A year later, BP tried to sell its U.S. wind power business but couldn’t get a buyer. read more

Shell Gears Up For Peak Gasoline

By Jon LeSage – Nov 07, 2017, 3:00 PM CST

Royal Dutch Shell is hedging its bets over the next two decades with expectations that motor fuel consumption will be diminishing and other markets rising.

Since the oil price plummet it 2014, Shell has transitioned its business model over to refining oil, offering other refined oil products, and producing petrochemicals. The oil giant will produce well beyond gasoline to serve other growing economic sectors, and to offset the role EVs will play by the 2030s. read more

Clock ticking down on deadline for Shell Springboard entries

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Entrants will be competing for a green cash pot containing £350,000, with the national winner to receive £150,000.

A further five regional winners will each get £40,000 of no-strings attached funding.

They will also be given access to academics and investors whose advice can help grow their enterprises.

The cut-off date for applications falls on November 6.

Former winners include Edinburgh-based tidal energy technology developer Nova Innovation. read more

Planning for a green future

Zhang Xinsheng, executive chairman of Shell Companies in China. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Editor’s Note:

The Communist Party of China has just concluded its 19th National Congress in Beijing. In the runup to the meeting, China Daily asked business leaders from major multinational companies for their views on economic developments here and the country’s global leadership role.

China Daily: 27 October 2017

Zhang Xinsheng is executive chairman of Shell Companies in China, a subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell Plc, the global energy group.

How can China achieve stable and sustainable economic growth? read more

Big Oil Is Investing Billions to Gain a Foothold in Clean Energy

The world’s biggest oil companies are closing more clean energy deals as pressure to diversify their businesses mounts and growth accelerates among green technologies.

Oil majors more than doubled the number of acquisitions, project investments and venture capital stakes, to 44 in 2016 from 21 the year before, according to research published Tuesday by Bloomberg New Energy Finance. In the last 15 years, they’ve completed 428 transactions and spent $6.2 billion building stakes in clean energy companies. read more

You Can Now Charge Electric Cars at Shell in the U.K.

Royal Dutch Shell Plc opened its first rapid charging point for electric cars at gasoline stations in the U.K., the latest sign that oil majors are waking up to the disruption plug-in vehicles could have on their industry.

The new Shell Recharge service is available at three sites in London, Surrey and Derby. It will expand to seven other locations in London and Reading by the end of the year, according to an emailed statement.

Britain has more than 8,000 retail stations, and those are closing at a rate of about 100 per year and and may number 6,000 by 2035 as electric cars spread, according to analysis by the oil-industry researcher Wood Mackenzie. In a race to lead the world in battery powered cars, the U.K. has also said it may require motorway service areas and large gasoline stations to install electric vehicle recharging points. It’s also said it will ban the sale of new vehicles that take diesel fuel by 2040. read more

Shell switches on to ‘rapid recharge’ for electric vehicles

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Shell has announced the opening of Shell Recharge – the new on-forecourt Electric Vehicle (EV) rapid charging service.

Shell Recharge is now available at Shell Holloway (London), Shell Whyteleafe (Surrey) and Shell Derby, and will be launched at a further seven locations within Greater London and Reading by the end of the year.

Jane Lindsay-Green, Shell UK Future Fuels Manager, said: “Shell Recharge provides Electric Vehicle drivers with a convenient way to charge their cars on-the-go. read more

Shell has seen the future – and it’s several shades of green

Ben Van Beurden, chief executive officer of Royal Dutch Shell, sees a future dominated by gas and renewables, with gas the clear winner. Photo: Bloomberg

By Ben Marlow: 

If there is one subject that divides energy producers it’s the question of when oil demand will peak.

Indeed, it is such a controversial topic that some senior figures like Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister, Khalid al-Falih, prefer not to discuss it at all.

He claims talk of peak demand is dangerous. It threatens to reduce vital investment, “compromising” energy security, al-Falih said earlier this year.

John Watson, boss of American oil giant Chevron, recently dismissed the idea of peak demand as “wishful thinking”. read more

Shell buys NewMotion charging network in first electric vehicle deal

Karolin Schaps: OCTOBER 12, 2017 / 1:23 PM

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) has agreed to buy Dutch-based NewMotion, the owner of one of Europe’s largest electric vehicle charging networks, marking the company’s first deal in electric mobility as demand for cleaner vehicles is expected to soar.

Shell said NewMotion, which manages over 30,000 charging points for electric vehicles in Western Europe and offers access to thousands more, will operate in parallel to Shell’s program of rolling out fast charging points at its forecourts. read more

Interview – Shell Netherlands CEO: More large wind projects wanted

Toby SterlingStefano Berra: OCTOBER 5, 2017

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – As the Netherlands struggles to meet its renewable energy goals, Shell’s country chief executive sees its role as the architect of big, high-risk projects such as wind turbine farms — for the time being.

In an interview, Marjan van Loon said Shell had joined a coalition of companies urging the Dutch government to greatly increase its ambitions for offshore wind farms from its current plan for 5 tenders of 700 megawatt farms. read more

Shell to Seek Sale of Stake in $1.4 Billion Wind Farm

Royal Dutch Shell Plc and its partners Eneco Holdings NV and Mitsubishi Corp. are seeking to sell a stake in two Dutch offshore wind-farm projects that may cost $1.4 billion to develop, two people familiar with the plan said.

The companies are looking to reduce their ownership in the Borssele III and IV wind farms by as much as 45 percent, according to the people who asked not to be named because they aren’t authorized to speak about it publicly. The fourth partner, infrastructure contractor Van Oord NV, is keeping its share of the project. read more

Shell plans $1B/year toward electric vehicle charging, energy management

|By: , SA News Editor

  • Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) is working on developing new energy technologies such as smart electric vehicle charging and models to reduce customers’ energy use, says Mark Gainsborough, head of the company’s New Energies division.
  • Goldman Sachs has predicted that oil demand could peak as early as 2024 due to the rollout of electric vehicles and rising fuel prices, and Shell says it plans to invest up to $1B/year through the New Energies division by the end of the decade as it seeks to ramp up involvement in technologies that are changing the market.
  • Gainsborough says Shell already has started to provide fast-charging for electric vehicles at its gasoline stations and is working on developing “smart charging” to help even out demand on the electricity grid.
  • read more

    Shell Electric Car Chargers

    Shell, one of the largest oil and gas companies in the world, is going electric. Photos uploaded this week show how the company’s new electric car chargers look in reality — and it looks like something out of a sci-fi film. 

    The Shell Recharge stations, as they are branded, are 50 kWh direct current chargers that can recharge a car’s battery to around 80 percent in 30 minutes. The stations will initially be available at 10 service stations this year in the United Kingdom, around the London, Reading and Derby areas. They support Chademo, CCS and AC Type 2 charging connectors, and the company plans to provide Tesla adaptors in the future. read more

    Shell explores electric vehicle charging, energy management businesses

    SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 / 8:20 AM

    AMSTERDAM, Sept 28 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell is working on developing new energy technologies like ‘smart’ electric vehicle charging and models to reduce customers’ energy use, the head of the oil company’s new energies division is set to say on Thursday.

    Shell intends to invest up to $1 billion a year through its New Energies division by the end of the decade as the oil company adjusts to an energy market that is moving towards more electrification, decentralised energy use and cleaner fuels. read more

    Dyson to make electric cars from 2020

    Dyson, the engineering company best known for its vacuum cleaners and fans, plans to spend £2bn developing a “radical” electric car.

    The battery-powered vehicle is due to be launched in 2020.

    Dyson says 400 staff have been working on the secret project for the past two years at its headquarters in Malmesbury, Wiltshire.

    However, the car does not yet exist, with no prototype built, and a factory site is yet to be chosen. read more

    It’s Not Just The CEO’s Car: Shell Converts Corporate Fleet To Plug-In Hybrids

    ,

    Shell CEO Ben van Beurden made headlines worldwide when he told an interviewer in July that his next car would be an electric vehicle, but he stopped short of a full disclosure: van Beurden’s new car is part of a company-wide conversion of the corporate fleet.

    Shell Technology Director Harry Brekelmans clarified this month that he too is getting a plug-in vehicle, though it’s a hybrid:

    “Indeed Ben’s next car is electrical, but what he also says time and again is that fossil fuels will remain a part of the energy mix for decades to come, so his next car’s a hybrid, not a full EV,” Brekelmans said in appearance at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “And I know because my next car also will be a hybrid, because we’re changing the corporate fleet.” read more

    Shell plans UK’s first ‘no-petrol’ station as journey towards clean motoring continues

    Jillian Ambrose: 

    Royal Dutch Shell is preparing to open Britain’s first “no-petrol” service station in the capital next year as part of its drive towards cleaner motoring.

    The forecourt is expected to offer motorists biofuels, electric vehicle charge points and hydrogen cell refuelling instead of traditional petrol and diesel pumps. Meanwhile, the buildings are due to be powered by ­renewable energy from solar panels on the forecourt roof.

    Sources close to the Anglo-Dutch oil giant told The Telegraph that a central London site had been chosen, but the project was still at a very early stage. A spokesman for Shell declined to comment. read more

    Economic storm on the horizon

    The rise of battery-powered cars threatens disaster for Houston’s oil and gas economy.

    Halfway around the globe, a storm is brewing that will pose a greater threat to our oil and gas industry than Hurricanes Harvey or Ike, or even a massive storm surge right up Houston Ship Channel.

    The danger: China wants to stop buying gasoline. Specifically, at an automotive conference in Tianjin, the nation’s vice minister of industry and information technology stated that the government is planning on a total phaseout of vehicles powered by fossil fuels. This announcement follows similar plans from Britain and France to ban sales of diesel and gasoline cars by 2040. That’s decades away, but the world is undeniably moving towards a future where the internal combustion engine is a thing of the past. read more

    Shell to Expand Presence in Asia and Alternative Fuel Market

    September 20, 2017, 01:35:00 PM EDT By Zacks Equity Research,

    Per Reuters, integrated oil and gas company, Royal Dutch Shell plc RDS.Aintends to increase its marketing operations in Asia region. The company’s effort to de-carbonize the energy system was reconfirmed as it targets to attain 20% of its global fuel station sales from electric vehicles recharging and fuels with a lower level of carbon by 2025.

    Expanding Asia Operations

    The oil major has 43,000 fuel stations in 80 countries and is now trying to reach the fuel markets of China and India, the two most populous countries in the world with high demand for energy. Shell is also eyeing the Indonesian fuel market. The company believes there will be continued growth in the Asian market over the next decade. read more

    Oil firm Shell planning to open its first UK electric car charging point next month

    Oil firm Shell is planning to open its first UK electric car charging point next month.

    Cars will be able to re-charge at a yet-to-be disclosed location in London.

    Bosses are trying to adapt as transport and other industries move away from fossil fuels. Demand for electric cars is expected to soar, with about 150m on the roads by 2040.

    Shell expects to open around 10 electric charging points around London by the end of the year. More will follow depending on customer demand. The firm ultimately wants 20 per cent of its retail fuel margins globally to come from non-diesel or petrol cars. read more

    Oil Majors Cut Greenhouse Gas Pollution

    By Foster Wong: 18 September 2017

    Big Oil had started fighting climate change before President Donald Trump took office read more

    Shell Targets Alternative Fuel Stations

    By Tsvetana Paraskova – Sep 12, 2017, 12:30 PM CDT

    Shell—one of the oil majors that is increasingly betting on natural gas and low-carbon fuels—is targeting 20 percent of its global fuel station sales to come from electric vehicles recharging and low-carbon fuels by 2025, John Abbott, Downstream Director at Shell, told Reuters in an interview published on Tuesday.

    While Shell plans to expand fuel stations in China, India, and Mexico—where it sees growth in this market over the next decade—it would continue to focus on meeting demand for cars running on fuels alternative to gasoline and diesel, Abbott said. read more

    Shell eyes Asia, aims to expand vehicle recharging at fuel stations

    SEPTEMBER 12, 2017

    * Shell is world’s biggest fuel station operator

    * Pilot projects to recharge cars in Europe, California

    * Company sees fossil fuel growth in China, India, Mexico

    * Focus on downstream earnings as crude price falls 

    By Ron Bousso and Dmitry Zhdannikov

    LONDON, Sept 12 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell aims to expand marketing operations in Asia and wants 20 percent of sales from its fuel stations worldwide to come from recharging electric vehicles and low carbon fuels by 2025, as the world shifts away from crude.

    The Anglo-Dutch firm, with 43,000 fuel stations in 80 countries, aims to expand in China and India, as well as Mexico, where it sees fossil fuel growth in the next decade, John Abbott, the head of refining, trading and marketing, told Reuters. read more

    Shell’s defence of big oil is too hopeful

    September 11, 2017, 11:40:00 AM EDT By Reuters

    By Andy Critchlow

    LONDON, Sept 11 (Reuters Breakingviews) – Royal Dutch Shell, looking deeply into its crystal ball, sees a future that’s still heavily dependent on oil. The Anglo-Dutch giant expects crude will continue to play a major role in global energy supply for decades, even in its less oil-friendly scenario. That optimism goes someway to justifying the billions of dollars it continues to invest in exploiting new reserves and expanding its fuel network. But it’s also a view that may place too much faith in the combustion engine – and China staying with its current strategy. read more

    General Motors, Disney, Shell and 1,200 other companies are taking steps to fight climate change, report says

    September 12 at 12:01 AM

    More than 1,200 global businesses, including U.S. companies such as Disney, Shell and General Motors, are moving to embrace a carbon price — even if President Trump isn’t, according to a new report by a Washington climate think tank.

    While the president has suggested that tackling climate change will undermine the economy and hamstring  businesses, chief executives have been busy voluntarily putting a price on their own carbon dioxide emissions. read more

    Shell Retail Looks to the Future With Car Charging, Clean Fuels

    A Mirai hydrogen fuel powered automobile, manufactured by Toyota Motor Corp., sits on the forecourt at Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s first U.K. hydrogen refueling station in Cobham, U.K., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Shell, crafting a strategy to wean itself off oil, is expanding its operations in the refueling market for hydrogen cars. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg Rakteem Katakey, Javier Blas: BloombergSeptember 11, 2017

    Royal Dutch Shell Plc wants 20 percent of income from its retail forecourts to come from vehicles that don’t burn diesel or gasoline, as the company anticipates an accelerating transition to clean energy over the coming decade. 

    Shell set up its first hydrogen refueling station in the U.K. earlier this year and will install its first electric car charging point later this month, said John Abbott, the top executive of its downstream business, which includes refining, marketing, retail, trading and chemicals. By 2025, he expects these new operations supplying cleaner fuels, including natural gas, to make up a fifth of retail earnings. read more

    Shell’s long view

    By Ed Crooks: Sunday September 10, 2017

    Royal Dutch Shell this week set out its views on the outlook over the next few decades, in presentations to investors in New York and London. Shell has been thinking deeply for decades about how to model the future. The scenarios it sets out are more explicit about the uncertainties involved than other projections, which sometimes seem to imply that we can be confident oil consumption in 2040 will be 110.8m barrels per day, or with other overly precise figures. read more

    Global shockwaves from electric cars will be here sooner rather than later

    Shift in power. Illustration: David Simonds/Observer

    Governments, the oil industry and car makers are waking up to the profound changes battery-powered cars will bring

    Sunday 10 September 2017

    Last week, Shell argued that the fuel savings from the efficiency improvements in internal combustion engines would outweigh those from electric vehicles threefold. The Anglo-Dutch company believes oil demand will not peak until the mid-2030s, despite expecting electric and plug-in hybrids cars to make up 35% of new car sales by then, up from 1% now. “To come radically earlier than the early 2030s [peak oil demand], there has to somehow be a demand change, and it’s not going to come from electric cars,” said Guy Outen, Shell’s executive vice-president of strategy and portfolio. But the company’s actions may tell a different story… FULL ARTICLE read more

    Shell criticises proposed future bans of non-electric cars

    by: Andrew Ward, Energy Editor: 8 Sept 2017

    A ban on petrol and diesel vehicles would be counterproductive if it undermines the development of more fuel-efficient engines, Royal Dutch Shell has said, while urging policymakers to let markets determine the best way to tackle climate change. Guy Outen, head of strategy for Shell, said the Anglo-Dutch oil and gas group supported those aims but said governments should not “pick winners” among green technologies.
    Shell’s argument will be seen by many as self-serving… FT ARTICLE read more

    Shell Expects Australia Gas Shortage to Trigger Export Restriction

    The world’s second-biggest liquefied natural gas exporting nation will probably curb shipments next year to avoid a domestic shortfall of the fuel, according to the Australian head of Royal Dutch Shell Plc.

    The Australian Energy Market Operator will probably declare a shortage for eastern states in the next two to four weeks, Shell Australia Chairwoman Zoe Yujnovich said at a Bloomberg event Wednesday in Sydney. That would trigger the country’s domestic gas security mechanism, a policy announced in June that could limit LNG exports from plants that draw more gas from local markets than they supply. read more

    Shell Invests to Boost Global Gas Demand

    Europe’s biggest energy company is investing in projects to boost global gas demand and aims to continue feeding the market it’s nurturing with new liquefied natural gas export plants.

    Royal Dutch Shell Plc is supporting the development of gas use in heavy transport such as shipping and is also helping smaller and less credit worthy customers begin importing LNG, Maarten Wetselaar, the company’s director of integrated gas and new energies, said at an event at Bloomberg’s Sydney office Wednesday. As new LNG customers enter the market, that will open a window for Shell and others to develop new low-cost export plants. read more

    Shell’s Ben van Beurden: Oil vs Uber in the battle of reputations

    In a throwaway comment, Ben van Beurden found himself front and centre on the national media’s radar. “It wasn’t a planned remark, it just came out,” he said.

    Written by

    But it wasn’t oil price, or strategy that landed him prime time interviews.

    Instead, it was the comment that his next car would be electric.

    “It wasn’t a planned remark, it just came out,” he said.

    “But it shows how charismatic renewables and electricity is at the moment, much more charismatic than gas and definitely much more charismatic than oil.”

    A perception that oil and gas have a shrinking role to play is one the industry needs to address head-on. read more

    INTERVIEW-Electric cars and renewables not enough to meet Paris climate goal – consultant

    Despite the rise in renewable energy, it is gas that will overtake oil as the world’s biggest energy source by 2034… This thinking underpinned, for example, Royal Dutch Shell’s $54 billion takeover of BG Group last year.

    * World will miss Paris target under current projections

    * Energy demand seen peaking around 2030

    * Electricity output to rise 140 pct by 2050 

    * Gas to overtake oil as main energy source by 2034

    By Karolin Schaps

    ARNHEM, The Netherlands, Sept 5 (Reuters) – The cost of electric vehicles (EVs) will fall to match those running on combustion engines by 2022, a key trigger that will mean by 2035 half of all passenger vehicles sold globally will be electric, according to the head of a top energy consultancy. read more

    Big Oil to be usurped by gas in little more than a decade, experts warn

    Jillian Ambrose: 

    THE dominance of Big Oil will be usurped in less than two decades by the dawn of a golden age for natural gas lasting at least until the middle of the century.

    One of the world’s biggest risk assurance experts in the global energy ­industry has predicted that gas will emerge as the world’s most important source of energy by the mid 2030s ­after a slow descent for oil which will peak within ten years and the ongoing decline of coal. read more

    Shell to build world’s largest hydrogen plant of its kind in Germany

    Written by

    The project, with ITM Power, will take shape at the Wesseling site of the Rhineland refinery.

    With a capacity of ten megawatts, it would be the largest plant of its kind in Germany and the largest PEM (polymer electrolyte membrane) electrolysis in the world.

    In addition to the production of hydrogen, the technology could also contribute to the stabilization of the electricity grid with an increasing share of irregularly available renewable energies in the energy mix. read more

    What You Missed in Royal Dutch Shell plc’s Quarterly Report

    Global energy giant Royal Dutch Shell hinted at how one number, over time, could change the future of the company

    Reuben Gregg Brewer: (TMFReubenGBrewer): Sep 1, 2017 at 9:16AM Royal Dutch Shell plc (NYSE:RDS-A) (NYSE:RDS-B) is one of the world’s largest integrated oil majors. It competes with the likes of ExxonMobil, Chevron, and Total. It recently doubled down on the energy business with a $50 billion acquisition. But while it’s working to pay off the debt it took on to get that deal done, CEO Ben van Beurden made an interesting statement about the future that you may have missed in the numbers of Shell’s quarterly report.

    What Shell looks like now

    There’s no question about how Royal Dutch Shell makes money. It is one of the world’s largest oil and natural gas drillers, with a large footprint in liquified natural gas. Oil and gas have been the driving force, broadly speaking, throughout all of the company’s over 100-years of existence. Investor questions generally focus on what management is doing to support and grow its core operations.

    In the first half of the year that included capital spending of roughly $11.5 billion. The goal for the year is for capital spending of between $25 and $30 billion. Right now management expects to be toward the low-end of that range. That range, meanwhile, is the goal every year from now until 2020. read more

    Shell Joins Solar Push in Coal Country of World’s Top Exporter

    Royal Dutch Shell Plc is investigating a solar power project in an Australian region better known for its fossil fuels, particularly coal.

    The company is studying the feasibility of a solar development on its land in the Western Downs area of Queensland, which is subject to a final investment decision, a spokeswoman said by email. Though Shell’s statement didn’t elaborate on timing or size, the regional council this week said it had approved construction of the 250-megawatt Delga Solar Farm project proposed by Shell at Woleebee, near Wandoan. read more

    Up to 800 possible jobs for solar farm which has been given green light

    Up to 800 possible jobs for solar farm which has been given green light

    POWER FROM THE SUN: An example of a large-scale solar farm.

    The Delga Solar Farm will be the project of Shell Australia, subsidiary of multi-national oil giant Royal Dutch Shell.

    THE Western Downs is keeping up its want to be Australia’s “energy capital” as it has approved the development application for the eighth solar farm project in the region yesterday morning.

    The 250MW Delga Solar Farm will be built 25km south-west of Wandoan. This continues the prominence of Wandoan in the region, adding to the largest solar farm in Australia to be built in the area, as well as the approval for a new coal mine. read more

    Big Oil Follows Silicon Valley Into Backing Green Energy Firms

    Oil majors quietly investing into new technology start-ups

    ‘Disruptive power’ from small companies prompts Shell to move

    Major oil companies are joining Silicon Valley in backing energy-technology start-ups, a signal that that those with the deepest pockets in the industry are casting around for a new strategy.

    From Royal Dutch Shell Plc to Total SA and Exxon Mobil Corp., the biggest investor-owned oil companies are dribbling money into ventures probing the edge of energy technologies. The investments go beyond wind and solar power into projects that improve electricity grids and brew new fuels from renewable resources. read more

    Shell and Exxon face censure over claim gas was ‘cleanest fossil fuel’

    The Dutch advertising watchdog will on Tuesday censure Shell and Exxon for claiming that natural gas was “the cleanest of all fossil fuels” in an advert earlier this year. It will be the second time this summer that the Netherlands advertising standards board has ruled against the fossil fuels industry… FULL ARTICLE 

    Shell Prepares For A Different Energy Reality

    : 14 August 2017

    Summary

    • This summer has seen the governments of several of the world’s major economies propose to eliminate internal combustion engine vehicles over the next 10-30 years.
    • At the same time, Royal Dutch Shell announced several major clean energy investments over the summer in anticipation of a drop-off in petroleum demand.
    • This article looks at how Shell’s clean energy investments fit into its energy profile forecasts compared to its peers.

    This summer has been filled with the sort of headlines that can give strategic planners in the petroleum & gas sector heartburn. One-upping Germany’s earlier non-binding pledge to ban new internal combustion engine [ICE] vehicles by 2030, the government of France’s new centrist president Emmanuel Macron announced in early July that the country will end sales of ICE vehicles by 2040. This move, which is part of that country’s efforts to comply with its greenhouse gas emission reduction target under 2015’s Paris Climate Agreement, would eliminate gasoline- and diesel-only engines and is aimed at reducing the country’s air pollution as it is at mitigating climate change. Britain intends to do the same by 2050. Even China and India, which have long been posited as important future sources of petroleum demand, are moving to electrify their vehicle fleets: China recently announced that it wants 25% of the country’s vehicles to be “alternative fuel” by 2025, while India is drafting plans to electrify all of its vehicles by 2030. read more

    Equis Is Said to Seek Binding Bids for $4 Billion Power Assets

    Equis Energy, the Singapore-based developer of power projects, has asked for binding bids for its $4 billion renewable energy business by late September, people with knowledge of the matter said.

    A consortium led by I Squared Capital is among suitors chosen to proceed in the bidding for the portfolio of Asia Pacific assets, according to the people. The infrastructure investment firm is partnering with Thai utility Electricity Generating Pcl and Japanese trading house Mitsubishi Corp., the people said, asking not to be identified because the information is private. read more

    Exxon Knew, Shell Knew, They All Knew

    08/09/2017 07:17 am ET

    In 2015, the Union of Concerned Scientists published its landmark exposé“The Climate Deception Dossiers,” which show that not only Exxon, but also Shell, BP, ConocoPhillips, Chevron and coal giant Peabody Energy were aware of the climate change reality since the 70s. Even so, through special interest groups, they invested tens of millions “to sow doubt and promote contrarian arguments they knew to be wrong.”

    The fuel that powers this planetary sabotage is called greed. The fossil fuel industry worldwide has accumulated stratospheric levels of wealth over the decades. Moreover, according to a report just published by World Development, in 2015, fossil fuels received a staggering $5.3 trillion in subsidies around the world. This includes not only taxpayer money but also the costs of deaths caused by pollution and these fuels’ contribution to the climate crisis. read more

    Shell invests in Singapore solar firm Sunseap; eyes solar projects

    Reuters Staff: AUGUST 1, 2017 / 11:18 AM

    SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell has invested in Singapore-based solar firm Sunseap Group for an undisclosed sum as part of a planned collaboration on solar projects in the Asia-Pacific region, the companies said on Tuesday.

    Shell declined to reveal the amount invested by Shell Technology Ventures, the company’s corporate venturing arm.

    Privately held Sunseap Group has about 160 megawatts of distributed solar contracts in Singapore, holds an electricity retailer license and has secured utility scale solar projects in the region, the two companies said. read more

    European oil majors seek to harness U.S. offshore wind

    Karolin Schaps and Susanna Twidale: AUGUST 1, 2017 / 10:34 AM

    LONDON (Reuters) – Some European oil majors have made inroads into the emerging U.S. offshore wind energy market, aiming to leverage their experience of deepwater development and the crowded offshore wind arena at home.

    Late entrants to the offshore wind game in Europe, which began with a project off Denmark 25 years ago and is now approaching maturity, they are looking across the Atlantic at what they view as a huge and potentially lucrative new market. read more

    OPEC’s Existential Sucker Punch

    Julian Lee: July 30, 2017 3:00 AM EDT

    You wait decades for an existential crisis, then two come along at once. At least that’s how it must feel for OPEC’s beleaguered ministers. In the short term the market for their oil is being eroded by rising production outside their control. Looking further ahead, oil demand itself is under threat from the electrification of road transport. OPEC may not yet be dead, but its days are surely numbered.

    The most obvious short-term threat to the group comes from the rapid rise in U.S. shale oil, but the risks have expanded to include other areas like Brazil’s prolific sub-salt discoveries and more recent finds further north along the east coast of South America. read more

    The electric jolt that roused Big Oil

    Jillian Ambrose: 

    Identifying a tipping point is not always easy. But when one of the world’s most powerful oil bosses says he is in the market for an electric car, there can be little doubt.

    Ben van Beurden, the Royal Dutch Shell boss, last week delivered the clearest indication yet that the burgeoning electric vehicle industry is already hastening the decline of global oil demand. “When that will be is not certain. But that it will happen, we are certain,” he told investors. read more

    Shell CEO Ben Van Beurden says his next car will be an electric Mercedes S500e


    Jul 28 2017 at 9:03 AM

    When the boss of Europe’s biggest listed oil company says his next car will be electric, it says a lot about the future of fossil fuels.

    Royal Dutch Shell responded to the worst oil-price crash in a generation with its $US54 billion ($68 billion) takeover of BG Group, betting that demand for natural gas will rise as the world shifts to cleaner-burning fuels. Now chief executive officer Ben Van Beurden says the next thing he’ll buy is a car that doesn’t depend on either oil or gas to run. read more

    Shell preparing for world economy that shifts away from oil

    By DANICA KIRKA Associated Press

    Royal Dutch Shell is planning for the day when demand for oil starts fading as major economies move away from oil and increasingly turn to electric-powered cars, Chief Executive Ben van Beurden said Thursday.

    Van Beurden welcomed recent proposals to phase out passenger vehicles powered by fossil fuels in Britain and France, saying they are needed to combat global warming. Shell is looking at “very aggressive scenarios” as it makes plans to remain competitive in a world that gets more of its energy from renewable sources and less from crude oil, or “liquids,” he said. read more

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