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Shell hires solar chief for Latam -source

Reuters Staff: JANUARY 22, 2018

SAO PAULO, Jan 22 (Reuters) – Anglo-Dutch oil company Shell has hired a former executive of U.S.-based First Solar to lead its solar energy business in Latin America, a source said on Monday, as the industry invests in renewable energy to address global concerns about carbon emissions.

Maria Gabriela da Rocha Oliveira, First Solar’s former senior manager of business development for Brazil and South America, will take on a similar role at Shell’s New Energies unit for the region, said the source, requesting anonymity to discuss the confidential matter. read more

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Shell signs five-year supply deal with U.K.’s second largest solar plant

|By: , SA News Editor

  • Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) signs a five-year agreement with British Solar Renewables for power generated by the U.K.’s second largest solar power plant.
  • Shell will receive the whole output of the Bradenstoke plant, which has a peak capacity of 69.8 MW and produces an average of 65 GWh/year; financial details are not provided.
  • Shell says the deal fits firmly into its New Energy Business strategy, which focuses on power and new fuels.
  • It is Shell’s second solar deal of the week, after announcing plans to buy a 43.8% stake in U.S.-based Silicon Ranch Corp.
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    Shell Inks Another Solar Deal

    By Irina Slav – Jan 18, 2018, 9:00 AM CST

    Just a couple of days after it acquired a hefty stake in a U.S. solar company, Shell has made another solar move, closing a power supply deal with British Solar Renewables. Shell Energy Europe, the regional marketing and trading unit of the supermajor, will receive the whole output of the Bradenstoke solar power plant—the second-largest in Britain—for a period of five years.

    Bradenstoke has a peak capacity of 69.8 MW and produces an average of 65 GWh annually. The size of the deal was not disclosed. read more

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    Shell agrees on five-year solar energy deal in Britain

    Reuters Staff: JAN 18, 2018

    LONDON (Reuters) – Shell Energy Europe and British Solar Renewables (BSR) have agreed on a five-year supply deal for power generated from Britain’s second-largest solar power plant in Bradenstoke, BSR said in a statement.

    The plant consists of 269,000 panels and has a 69.8 megawatt peak capacity. On an annual basis, it generates approximately 65 gigawatt-hours of solar energy, saving over 21,000 tonnes of CO2 a year, BSR said.

    Shell Energy Europe, an energy marketing and trading division of Royal Dutch Shell, is present in 14 European power markets, which includes the offtake of renewable power from wind farms and solar parks in Britain and Europe. read more

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    Shell ventures back into solar

    Ron Bousso: 15 JAN 2018

    LONDON (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell agreed on Monday to acquire a stake in a U.S. solar company, 12 years after exiting the sector, in the latest in a series of deals to grow beyond its core oil and gas business.

    The Anglo-Dutch company also gave the green light for its first major new project in the North Sea in six years, signaling a cautious return to spending following three years of belt tightening in the face of lower oil prices.

    Shell agreed to buy a 43.86 percent stake in Silicon Ranch Corporation from funds linked to Partners Group for up to $217 million. It follows on the heels of British rival BP, which last month also re-entered the solar sector with the $200 million investment in Lightsource. read more

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    Fossil fuels blown away by wind in cost terms: study

    New onshore wind and solar energy projects are set to deliver electricity more cheaply than fossil fuels plants, with other green technologies also rapidly gaining a cost advantage over dirty fuels, a report published Saturday said. 

    According to a new cost analysis from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), within two years “all the renewable power generation technologies that are now in commercial use are expected to fall within the fossil fuel-fired cost range, with most at the lower end or undercutting fossil fuels”.

    It expects renewables will cost between three and 10 US cents per kilowatt hour (kWh) by 2020, while the current cost spectrum for fossil fuel power generation ranges from five to 17 US cents per kWh. read more

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    Shell develops solar power plant at its Moerdijk chemicals site in the Netherlands

    By PennEnergy Editorial Staff Source: Shell

    The Netherlands – Shell is developing a solar power plant at its Moerdijk chemicals site, with construction planned to begin in 2018. The project will provide an approximate peak capacity of 20MW of renewable power. The power produced from the solar plant will be incorporated in the energy consumption of Shell Moerdijk. The power produced in the installation is the equivalent of the power consumption of approximately 7,000 Dutch households.

    “Developing this solar power plant in Moerdijk fits within Shell’s ambition to play an active role in the Dutch energy transition,” says Marjan van Loon, president-director Shell Nederland. “We are eager to limit emissions through energy efficiency improvements of our processes and investments in new energy activities at the same time. Other examples of Shell’s work in the Netherlands energy transition include offshore wind in the North Sea, electric mobility at our retail sites and residual heat from Shell Pernis.” read more

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    Shell’s Energy Transition Speeds Up

    : 18 Dec 2017

    Summary

    • Royal Dutch Shell doubled down on its previously-announced investments in clean energy earlier this month when its CEO told investors that it has raised this to $2 billion next year.
    • The company also announced its intention to reduced its greenhouse gas emissions by 50% through 2050.
    • While the success of Shell’s proposed energy transition remains uncertain, its plans reflect recent developments in the energy markets and multinational policymaking.

    Last July the multinational petroleum and gas giant Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A)(RDS.B) announced its intention to spend $1 billion a year on clean energy investments through its New Energy division. As I highlighted the following month, this decision was set against a busy backdrop of involvement by the company in the Climate Leadership Council, which (unsuccessfully) urged the Trump administration to keep the U.S. in the Paris Climate Accord, and investments in renewable electricity capacity. Those maneuvers, it turns out, were just the opening moves. As reported by The New York Times last week, Shell’s transition from a fossil fuel producer to a broader energy provider is rapidly accelerating. read more

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    Shell, to Cut Carbon Output, Will Be Less of an Oil Company

    By Nov. 28, 2017

    Bowing to pressure from shareholders and the Paris international climate accord, Royal Dutch Shell pledged on Tuesday to increase its investment in renewable fuels and to cut its carbon emissions in half by 2050.

    Shell and other big oil companies have moved only sporadically over the last decade toward greater production of wind and solar energy. Now there are signs of a commitment to take climate change more seriously.

    In comments to investors, Ben van Beurden, Shell’s chief executive, said that from 2018 to 2020, the company’s new-energies division would spend up to $2 billion a year on renewable energy sources like wind, solar and hydrogen power and on electric-car charging stations. read more

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    Shell doubles up on green spending and vows to halve carbon footprint

    Anglo-Dutch giant to spend $2bn on wind power, biofuels and electric cars as it bows to shareholder pressure by setting new company climate change target 

    Shell has doubled its spending on clean power and bowed to shareholder pressure by promising to halve the carbon footprint of the energy it sells by 2050, as the oil giant said it was stepping up its ambitions on green energy.

    FULL ARTICLE

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    Shift to Hydrogen Could Meet 20% of World Energy Needs by 2050

    Shell, Statoil and BMW among companies urging support for fuel

    Transition requires investment of up to $25 billion a year

    The most abundant element may supply almost a fifth of global energy by 2050 and eliminate enough emissions to cancel out all the pollution in the U.S., according to a group of industrial companies from Royal Dutch Shell Plc to Toyota Motor Corp.

    Fuel-cell vehicles running on hydrogen, extracted from water using wind and solar power, may be used to power everything from cars to factories, according to the Hydrogen Council, a group that also includes the German automaker BMW AG, the mining giant Anglo American Plc and the French energy company Engie SA. The group estimated hydrogen has the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by about 6 gigatons a year, more than the 5.5 gigatons the U.S. released in 2016. read more

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    Peak oil? Majors aren’t buying into the threat from renewables

    Ernest Scheyder, Ron Bousso: NOVEMBER 8, 2017 HOUSTON/LONDON (Reuters) – Two decades ago, BP set out to transcend oil, adopting a sunburst logo to convey its plans to pour $8 billion over a decade into renewable technologies, even promising to power its gas stations with the sun.

    That transformation – marketed as “Beyond Petroleum” – led to manufacturing solar panels in Australia, Spain and the United States and erecting wind farms in the United States and the Netherlands.

    Today, BP (BP.L) might be more aptly branded “Back to Petroleum” after exiting or scaling back its renewable energy investments. Lower-cost Chinese components upended its solar panel business, which the firm shed in 2011. A year later, BP tried to sell its U.S. wind power business but couldn’t get a buyer. read more

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    Shell Joins Solar Push in Coal Country of World’s Top Exporter

    Royal Dutch Shell Plc is investigating a solar power project in an Australian region better known for its fossil fuels, particularly coal.

    The company is studying the feasibility of a solar development on its land in the Western Downs area of Queensland, which is subject to a final investment decision, a spokeswoman said by email. Though Shell’s statement didn’t elaborate on timing or size, the regional council this week said it had approved construction of the 250-megawatt Delga Solar Farm project proposed by Shell at Woleebee, near Wandoan. read more

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    Up to 800 possible jobs for solar farm which has been given green light

    Up to 800 possible jobs for solar farm which has been given green light

    POWER FROM THE SUN: An example of a large-scale solar farm.

    The Delga Solar Farm will be the project of Shell Australia, subsidiary of multi-national oil giant Royal Dutch Shell.

    THE Western Downs is keeping up its want to be Australia’s “energy capital” as it has approved the development application for the eighth solar farm project in the region yesterday morning.

    The 250MW Delga Solar Farm will be built 25km south-west of Wandoan. This continues the prominence of Wandoan in the region, adding to the largest solar farm in Australia to be built in the area, as well as the approval for a new coal mine. read more

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