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Posts under ‘Oil Prices’

Oil stable on tighter market, but rising US output looms for 2018

BY HENNING GLOYSTEIN: DECEMBER 15, 2017

* OPEC-led supply cuts, Forties pipeline outage support crude

* But rising U.S. output, driven by shale, weighs on market

SINGAPORE, Dec 15 (Reuters) – Oil markets were stable on Friday as the Forties pipeline outage in the North Sea and the ongoing OPEC-led production cuts supported prices, while rising output from the United States kept crude from rising further.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $57.13 a barrel at 0119 GMT, up 9 cents from their last settlement. read more

Goldman Says Big Oil Is Poised for Its Best Year in Decades

Big Oil’s slump is over and industry domination beckons, according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc.

In 2018, companies from Royal Dutch Shell Plc to Exxon Mobil Corp. will find themselves with a surplus of cash to fund dividends, ruling the world of deep water mega-projects and even coming out ahead in tax negotiations with oil-reliant governments around the globe, according to Michele Della Vigna, Goldman’s head of energy-industry research.

The industry’s success in cutting costs, paired with a low oil price that keeps smaller competitors out of the biggest projects, has created an environment where only major players can compete, Vigna said. That should bolster earnings and return the industry giants to a position of dominance not seen in 20 years. read more

A decisive step to a cleaner energy future

Chief Executive Officer at Shell

It’s time for Shell to accelerate its efforts in the transition to a lower-carbon world. This is how I plan to drive change through the company.

How will a future CEO of Shell judge what I have just announced? Will they look back to the end of 2017 and consider it a turning point? In 20 years? 30 years? If things move as I expect, they probably will.

By then, I believe Shell will be at least as profitable and successful as today but it will be a very different company.

We will still have plenty of oil and gas in our energy mix but other areas of the business, which are small today, will have grown. read more

Shell: ‘No plans’ to sell North Sea assets

Shell has told BBC Scotland it has no more plans to sell assets

Oil giant Shell will not sell off any more North Sea assets.

A senior figure at the company has told BBC Scotland he has no plans to sell resources despite the chancellor announcing measures to make the process easier.

Shell has just completed the sale of a package of assets to the company Chrysaor for $3.8bn.

It included stakes in the Buzzard, Beryl, Elgin-Franklin and Schiehallion fields.

Director of Shell’s Upstream Commercial business, Steve Phimister, said he would now invest in what remains. read more

Royal Dutch Shell’s Deepwater Strength

Dividend Stream: Nov. 30, 2017

Summary

  • Royal Dutch Shell held its annual analyst day earlier this week.
  • Management expects to generate at least $25 billion in excess cash flow by 2019.
  • Despite rising share prices, Shell can still be picked up here.
  • This idea was discussed in more depth with members of my private investing community, Streaming Income.

The recovery in oil and gas is in full swing. While benchmark crude oil prices have gone up across the board, Brent is now $63 per barrel, the catalyst for this recovery comes more in the fact that oil producers have done such a good job in bringing costs down.

Nowhere is that more starkly noticeable than in offshore, deepwater drilling, where dayrates for state-of-the-art rigs have gone from as high as $700,000 three years ago to just $250,000 or so. As onshore rig counts creep higher, cost inflation is once again becoming a fact of life in select onshore shale plays. With deepwater drilling, however, there are still many rigs ‘stacked’ in harbors across the world just waiting to come out and get activated, thereby keeping development and operational costs down. read more

Investors’ fortunes transformed as Shell restores cash dividend

Royal Dutch Shell investors reaped the rewards of its “transformation” yesterday when it said that it would resume paying its entire $16 billion annual dividend in cash and would press ahead with at least $25 billion of share buybacks by 2020.

Europe’s biggest listed energy company has been saving cash over the past two and a half years by paying about a quarter of its dividend in the form of new shares, part of a strategy to help it to cope with the longest sustained downturn in oil prices for a generation. read more

Shell, to Cut Carbon Output, Will Be Less of an Oil Company

By Nov. 28, 2017

Bowing to pressure from shareholders and the Paris international climate accord, Royal Dutch Shell pledged on Tuesday to increase its investment in renewable fuels and to cut its carbon emissions in half by 2050.

Shell and other big oil companies have moved only sporadically over the last decade toward greater production of wind and solar energy. Now there are signs of a commitment to take climate change more seriously.

In comments to investors, Ben van Beurden, Shell’s chief executive, said that from 2018 to 2020, the company’s new-energies division would spend up to $2 billion a year on renewable energy sources like wind, solar and hydrogen power and on electric-car charging stations. read more

Shell signals an end to the oil downturn with return of all-cash payouts

Jillian Ambrose: 

Royal Dutch Shell has signalled the end of the three-year oil market downturn by restarting its all-cash shareholder payouts as its cash flow begins to boom.

The oil major began paying out dividends in the form of shares in 2015, in the wake of the oil price crash and its $50bn takeover of BG Group.

But chief executive Ben van Beurden said the Anglo-Dutch group was now confident that it could call an end its scrip dividend as its cost-cutting and divestment programme pays off. read more

Shell signals return to pure cash dividend, focus on renewables

FILE PHOTO: Ben van Beurden, chief executive officer of Royal Dutch Shell, speaks during a news conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, February 15, 2016. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes /File Photo

Ron Bousso: NOVEMBER 18, 2017

LONDON (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) will return to paying pure cash dividends and step up its investment in cleaner energy as it turns a corner after more than two years of cost cuts and disposals prompted by weak oil prices.

Shell Chief Executive Officer Ben van Beurden sought to strike a balance between reassuring investors it can increase returns in its core fossil fuel business during an “era of volatility” in oil prices while preparing to step up investments in renewables. read more

Shell Updates Company Strategy and Financial Outlook

NEWS PROVIDED BY: Royal Dutch Shell plc

THE HAGUE, Netherlands, November 28, 2017 /PRNewswire/ —

  • Scrip dividend programme to be cancelled with effect from the fourth quarter 2017 dividend
  • Annual organic free cash flow outlook increased to $25 to $30 billionby 2020, at $60 per barrel (real terms 2016)
  • Company sets ambition to reduce the net carbon footprint of its energy products in step with societys drive to align with the Paris Agreement goals

Royal Dutch Shell plc (Shell) (NYSE: RDS.A) (NYSE: RDS.B) Chief Executive Officer, Ben van Beurden, today updated investors on the company’s strategy, setting out plans to grow returns and free cash flow, and outlining its ambition to reduce the net carbon footprint of its energy products.

“Our next steps as we re-shape Shell into a world-class investment aim to ensure that our company can continue to thrive, not just in the short and medium term but for many decades to come,” said van Beurden. “These steps build on the foundations of Shell’s strong operational and financial performance, and my confidence in our strategy and our ability to deliver on the promises we make.” read more

Shell scraps scrip dividend after three years of austerity

Ron Bousso: NOVEMBER 28, 2017

LONDON, Nov 28 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell on Tuesday said it will cancel an austerity dividend policy as the oil and gas company boosted its cash generation forecasts, drawing a line under three years of oil price turmoil.

The Anglo-Dutch company said it will abolish its scrip dividend, through which investors can opt to receive dividends in shares or cash, in the fourth quarter of 2017. The scrip dividend scheme was introduced in early 2015 following the sharp drop in oil prices. read more

Shell and carmakers aim to go the distance with highway charging

Ron Bousso: NOVEMBER 27, 2017

LONDON (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) has partnered with top carmakers to deploy ultra-fast chargers on Europe’s highways, stealing a march on rivals in the race to remove one of the biggest obstacles facing the electric car sector.

Shell’s agreement with IONITY – a joint venture between BMW (BMWG.DE), Daimler (DAIGn.DE), Ford (F.N) and Volkswagen (VOWG_p.DE) – will initially bring high-powered docks to 80 highway sites in 2019, it said in a statement. read more

Shell prepares to reward investors by restoring bigger cash payouts

Royal Dutch Shell introduced its scrip dividend programme in 2015 (Source: Getty)

Oliver Gill: Sunday 26 November 2017 6:14pm

Oil behemoth Royal Dutch Shell has been tipped to dish out more cash to investors as it scraps a programme of paying dividends in the form of shares. Analysts from UBS believe it is a case of “when not if” Shell restores a full cash dividend.

Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden is expected to signal the changes at a London management day on Tuesday.

The oil giant put a scrip dividend programme – where part of the firm’s dividend is paid by issuing new shares – in place in 2015 to reduce demands on cash as debt spiralled. Shell’s cash reserves were put under pressure by a combination of soft oil prices and a £47bn deal to buy gas producer BG. read more

Ben van Beurden prepares to restore Royal Dutch Shell cash dividend

Royal Dutch Shell is tipped to resume paying all its dividend in cash this week — unplugging a gusher worth billions of pounds for investors.

Chief executive Ben van Beurden is expected to signal the move on Tuesday, when he lays out his vision for Britain’s most valuable public company.

Abandoning the so-called scrip dividend programme would mark the latest stage in the Anglo-Dutch company’s recovery from the depths of the oil industry downturn. The company has paid a slice of its dividend in stock since early 2015, when the plunging oil price forced Van Beurden to marshal resources. read more

Norway Idea to Exit Oil Stocks Is ‘Shot Heard Around the World’

Norway’s proposal to sell off $35 billion in oil and natural gas stocks brings sudden and unparalleled heft to a once-grassroots movement to enlist investors in the fight against climate change.

The Nordic nation’s $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund said Thursday that it’s considering unloading its shares of Exxon Mobil Corp., Royal Dutch Shell Plc and other oil giants to diversify its holdings and guard against drops in crude prices. European oil stocks fell.

Norges Bank Investment Management would not be the first institutional investor to back away from fossil fuels. But until now, most have been state pension funds, universities and other smaller players that have limited their divestments to coal, tar sands or some of the other dirtiest fossil fuels. Norway’s fund is the world’s largest equity investor, controlling about 1.5 percent of global stocks. If it follows through on its proposal, it would be the first to abandon the sector altogether. read more

Big Oil is under pressure, unloved and on sale. 

  • Norway wants to dump its stakes in oil and gas companies
  • Proposal adds to doubts over industry’s long-term outlook

Big Oil is under pressure, unloved and on sale.

Energy giants from Exxon Mobil Corp. to Royal Dutch Shell Plc are struggling back to their feet after a three-year oil slump, while also fighting to prove they can survive for decades to come amid an accelerating shift to clean energy. So getting dumped by the world’s biggest investment fund wouldn’t be welcome news.

Norway’s $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund said on Thursday that it wants to sell about $35 billion of shares in oil and gas companies to make the nation “less vulnerable” to a drop in crude prices. Global energy giants favored by long-term investors including Italy’s Eni SpA, PetroChina Ltd. and Russia’s Gazprom PJSC account for more than $20 billion of that total. read more

Shell’s LNG Strategy A Great Complement To Overall Operations

Zoltan Ban: Nov 13, 2017

Summary

  • LNG is set to see robust growth on the back of growing global dependence on natural gas. The LNG industry will provide more supply security, which will be increasingly desired.
  • Shell has become a global leader in LNG, after the BG merger.
  • The advantage of investing in Shell as a way to play the LNG growth story is the fact that its downstream segment will act as a hedge in bad times.

Beyond the recent hype created by the Saudi events, there is a trend of steady and sustainable advance in the price of oil, which I believe is likely to continue for as long as the current global economic cycle that started with the 2009 economic recovery is going to persist. In fact, I believe that the trigger for the next economic downturn will be an oil price spike, perhaps very similar to what we saw in the 2007-2008 period. This is how I saw the situation play out back in late 2015, which is when I decided to buy Shell’s (RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) stock, along with Chevron (CVX) and Suncor (SU). It is a long-term bet on a trend that I am certain will happen, although the timing of it was never something I was as certain of, which is why I opted to buy only solid names, with a diverse portfolio of projects. read more

As Oil Prices Rise, Global Majors Eyeing Mexico’s Deep Waters

By Adam Williams: 9 November 2017, 21:27 GMT: Updated on 10 November 2017, 05:01 GMT

As the price of oil rises, an international rush is on for Mexico’s untapped deep-water riches.

The who’s who of the oil world — led by Exxon Mobil Corp and Royal Dutch Shell Plc, the world’s two biggest drillers by market value — are lining up to bid in the country’s Jan. 31 deep-water auction. And the interest is international in scope, drawing Chevron Corp. from the U.S., the U.K.’s BP Plc, Norway’s Statoil ASA, France’s Total SA, Australia’s BHP Billiton Ltd, Russia’s Lukoil PJSC and China’s Cnooc Ltd, among others. read more

Oil Tumbles as Surprise Stockpile Surge Outweighs Platform Woes

  • Shell shuts Enchilada platform in Gulf of Mexico Wednesday
  • U.S. drillers lift crude production to an all-time high: EIA

Crude went on a roller-coaster ride Wednesday as platform closures in the Gulf of Mexico led futures to spike, while the stubborn increase in U.S. supplies pulled prices back down.

Oil closed 0.7 percent lower in New York after alternating between gains and losses in the session. Multiple platforms in the Gulf of Mexico suspended operations after Royal Dutch Shell Plc shut its Enchilada-Salsa platform due to a fire. While the shutdowns caused shortages, the prevailing mood was set by a government report showing crude stockpiles unexpectedly rose last week, overseas demand shrank and U.S. output hit a record-high. read more

Shell Gears Up For Peak Gasoline

By Jon LeSage – Nov 07, 2017, 3:00 PM CST

Royal Dutch Shell is hedging its bets over the next two decades with expectations that motor fuel consumption will be diminishing and other markets rising.

Since the oil price plummet it 2014, Shell has transitioned its business model over to refining oil, offering other refined oil products, and producing petrochemicals. The oil giant will produce well beyond gasoline to serve other growing economic sectors, and to offset the role EVs will play by the 2030s. read more

Oil prices head towards $70 in the wake of Saudi purge

Jillian Ambrose: 

Global oil prices broke above two year highs and could climb higher to hit $70 a barrel in the wake of a shock anti-corruption purge of Saudi royals and senior officials.

Oil prices bounded to highs not seen since July 2015 at over $64 a barrel on Monday following a sweep of arrests targeting ministers, investors and members of the Saudi royal family on corruption charges over the weekend.

The shock crackdown also helped drive shares in Royal Dutch Shell to within a breath of its highest ever share price at £24.89 following the company’s rosy financial results last week. Before the oil price crash in late 2014 the company’s shares traded at a peak of £25.76. read more

Why Royal Dutch Shell’s Value Increased by $10 Billion in October

Shell has had a great year, and October added to the up trend, even though there wasn’t much actual news.

Reuben Gregg Brewer (TMFReubenGBrewer) Nov 6, 2017 at 4:32PM

What happened

Shares of Royal Dutch Shell plc (NYSE:RDS-B) rose 4.5% in October, which doesn’t sound like a huge amount until you consider it in dollar terms. That move is the equivalent of a $10 billion increase in the integrated oil major’s market cap. By comparison, competitor Chevron‘s stock fell more than 1% and ExxonMobil was up just 1.5% (or so) in the month. That, however, is the continuation of a trend, since Shell has been outperforming its peers all year long.

So what

The interesting thing is that there wasn’t much news to drive Shell’s performance last month. However, since around July and August, Shell has been on a tear. There are two parts to this solid showing. First, oil has been heading in a generally upward direction since about that point. Shell is a commodity company, so energy prices will be a big piece of the performance puzzle. read more

Shell Swallows BG Group Whole Hog, Rolls Up Cash Flow

Ray Merola: Nov. 6, 2017

Summary

  • Shell is enjoying a remarkably successful corporate resurgence.
  • Legacy BG Group opex and capex has been absorbed entirely without a loss of combined hydrocarbon volumes.
  • Cash is king.
  • Debt is trending down.  The dividend is well-covered.  Returns are solid, and improving.
  • I remain constructive on RDS stock.

I’ve been pounding my fist on the table for Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A) (RDS.B) for a couple of years now. It’s been that one, “fat pitch” worth waiting upon; these don’t come along very often. Since the end of 2015, ADR shares offered investors ~54% total return, or an 80% gain since the stock bottomed in January 2016.

The 3Q report included the hallmarks of recent previous quarters: linked-quarter revenue growth, continued strong cash flow, improving return-on-capital, reduced gearing, steady production, and ample dividend coverage. Details are found here. read more

Royal Dutch Shell: The Cash Machine

 Nov. 6, 2017 12:35 PM ET

Summary

  • Royal Dutch Shell has reported nearly 50% increase in profits following improvement in energy prices which fueled a turnaround of its upstream division.
  • In the first three quarters of 2017, Royal Dutch Shell generated $15.42 billion of free cash flows (ex. working cap. changes), surpassing even the industry’s cash flow king Exxon Mobil.
  • Oil prices have climbed to almost $61 a barrel and could stay at this level in the future, which could give a major boost to Shell’s earnings and cash flows.

Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) is a well-oiled cash flow machine. In fact, it generates more free cash flows than any other oil majors, and this was evident from the latest quarterly results. The Anglo-Dutch oil giant could get even better in 2018 on the back of improvement in oil prices. The company’s shares will likely move higher while its valuation might also improve.

Latest Earnings

Royal Dutch Shell has recently released blowout quarterly results in which it posted significantly higher profits following a strong performance from its upstream, downstream and integrated gas divisions. The company reported an adjusted net profit (attributable to shareholders on a current cost of supplies (CCS) basis) of $4.1 billion, up 47% from the same quarter last year. That blew past the company-provided analysts’ estimate of $3.6 billion. The profits at the upstream segment ballooned from just $4 million a year earlier to $562 million. The profits at the downstream and integrated gas segments rose 28.4% and 37.7% to $2.67 billion and $1.28 billion respectively. read more

Shell looks beyond road fuels to secure future of refining

REUTERS STAFF: NOVEMBER 6, 2017 / 7:00 AM

* Asphalt, plastics, chemicals to sustain demand, Shell says

* Shell to double chemicals business by mid-2020s

* Downstream highly independent from oil prices – Shell’s Abbott 

By Ron Bousso and Dmitry Zhdannikov

LONDON, Nov 6 (Reuters) – While the world braces for the electric-vehicle revolution, Royal Dutch Shell is betting on growing appetite for asphalt and plastics to sustain its century-old oil refining business for the coming decades. read more

Royal Dutch Shell takes cashflow crown off Exxon Mobil

Royal Dutch Shell has taken Exxon Mobil’s cashflow crown, a year after completing the biggest deal in its history.

Europe’s largest energy company vaulted ahead on this closely watched indicator of financial health in the first nine months of 2017 as assets acquired from BG Group from Brazil to Australia churned out cash. For the year as a whole, Shell is on course to surpass its larger US rival on the measure for the first time in about two decades.

Shell generated $28.38 billion (€24.34bn) of cashflow from operations in the first nine months of the year, compared with $23.52 billion (€20.18bn) from Exxon. Chief executive Ben Van Beurden has already spelled out that his main long-term goal was overtaking Exxon to become the best-performing oil major. read more

Oil rebound drives Shell to booming profits

Jillian Ambrose: 

Royal Dutch Shell became the latest major oil company to deliver better than expected earnings in recent months as the market recovery begins to gain traction.

The Anglo-Dutch oil giant reported $4.1bn (£3bn) in earnings for the last quarter on a current cost of supply basis, its standard measure of profitability. The sum comes in well above analyst forecasts that the group would make $3.6bn for the latest quarter.

Shell’s quarterly earnings are almost 50pc higher than in the same quarter last year, when they reached $2.8bn. read more

Shell beats profit forecasts, targets lower 2017 spending

Ron Bousso

LONDON (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) reported an 18 percent rise in third-quarter profit on Tuesday, lowering next year’s capital spending to the bottom of the expected range as it grapples with persistently low oil prices and weak refining margins.

The Anglo-Dutch oil major, whose acquisition of BG Group transformed it into the world’s top liquefied natural gas producer, has been under pressure from shareholders to cut annual spending to ensure it can maintain its dividend given the slow recovery in the oil prices LCOc1. read more

Threat to pensions if BP and Shell find themselves extinct


Stop crude focus on oil profits

The Guardian: Article by Sean Farrell: Sunday 29 October 2017

At the start of last year, Britain’s big oil companies, Shell and BP, appeared to be in crisis. A slump in the price of Brent crude – from more than $110 a barrel in 2014 to less than $30 in January 2016 – sent profits tumbling and appeared to threaten dividends. After painful cost cuts and a partial recovery in the oil price to near $60, the pressure has eased and both are expected to report solid first-half results this week.

BP goes first, on Tuesday, with Shell, the stronger of the two, on Thursday. The commotion over the oil slump diverted some attention from their commitments to low-carbon energy. To much fanfare, both companies’ boards supported resolutions at their 2015 annual meetings that required clearer reporting of emissions, business risks and efforts to develop green energy sources. read more

Profits Jump at Exxon, Chevron, Total

World’s biggest Western energy companies are on track to post highest annual profits since oil market crashed three years ago

By Bradley Olson and Sarah Kent

Big oil is back in the black.

The world’s biggest Western energy companies are on track to post the highest annual profits since the oil market crashed three years ago and forced them to restructure for a prolonged era of low prices. FULL ARTICLE

Amid Low Prices, Oil Giants Gush About Breaking Even

By Sarah Kent Dow Jones Newswires

The world’s biggest oil companies have a suddenly popular measure for success: breaking even.

Once obscure and little noted, the break-even number has become an obsession for investors in oil giants such as Exxon Mobil Corp., BP PLC and Chevron Corp. as crude prices stay mired between $50 and $60 a barrel. At its simplest, the metric represents the oil price that a company needs to generate enough cash so it can cover its capital spending and dividend payouts. read more

Shell says can pump oil from Brazil’s pre-salt fields below $40/bbl

Wael Sawan, Executive Vice President for Shell’s deepwater division, poses for a picture before an interview for Reuters during an oil conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil October 24, 2017. Picture take October 24, 2017. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly

Simon WebbAlexandra Alper: OCTOBER 25, 2017

RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell will participate in Brazil’s deepwater oilfield auction on Friday and is confident it can pump oil from the fields on offer for less than $40 a barrel, a top Shell executive said.

Brazil will hold its first auction in four years for its pre-salt oilfields on Friday. The eight deepwater blocks on offer hold billions of barrels in reserves, and for the first time, Brazil will allow foreign oil firms to operate the fields in the region. read more

Big Oil Is Investing Billions to Gain a Foothold in Clean Energy

The world’s biggest oil companies are closing more clean energy deals as pressure to diversify their businesses mounts and growth accelerates among green technologies.

Oil majors more than doubled the number of acquisitions, project investments and venture capital stakes, to 44 in 2016 from 21 the year before, according to research published Tuesday by Bloomberg New Energy Finance. In the last 15 years, they’ve completed 428 transactions and spent $6.2 billion building stakes in clean energy companies. read more

Shell has seen the future – and it’s several shades of green

Ben Van Beurden, chief executive officer of Royal Dutch Shell, sees a future dominated by gas and renewables, with gas the clear winner. Photo: Bloomberg

By Ben Marlow: 

If there is one subject that divides energy producers it’s the question of when oil demand will peak.

Indeed, it is such a controversial topic that some senior figures like Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister, Khalid al-Falih, prefer not to discuss it at all.

He claims talk of peak demand is dangerous. It threatens to reduce vital investment, “compromising” energy security, al-Falih said earlier this year.

John Watson, boss of American oil giant Chevron, recently dismissed the idea of peak demand as “wishful thinking”. read more

Shell seeks buyers for Oman field stake – sources

Ron Bousso, Clara Denina: OCTOBER 10, 2017 / 3:55 PM

LONDON (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) is seeking to sell its 17 percent stake in the Mukhaizna oil field in Oman, which could fetch up to $200 million, banking sources said. 

The sale process is led by investment bank Rothschild, the sources said.

Shell and Rothschild did not respond to requests for comment. 

The Mukhaizna heavy oil field, operated by Occidental Petroleum (OXY.N), reached an average oil production rate of 127,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day in 2016, according to Occidental’s annual report. read more

Why Shell Investors Shouldn’t Ignore The Ongoing Security Situation In Nigeria

 Oct. 4, 2017 5:28 AM ET

Summary

  • Attacks on oil & gas infrastructure in Nigeria pose a serious risk to Royal Dutch Shell.
  • Looking at Shell’s footprint in the country.
  • How it has been impacted so far.

Royal Dutch Shell plc (NYSE:RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) is a big player in Nigeria, a country that has been dealing with increases in civil unrest and sporadic violence over the past few years, particularly from the Niger Delta Avengers group that wants a larger portion of the oil & gas tax revenue to go to the Niger Delta region. This is on top of Nigeria’s ongoing fight against the Boko Haram insurgency in the northern parts of the country. The ongoing security situation is a major risk for Shell’s Nigerian operations, especially as the Niger Delta Avengers have shown the ability to repeatedly target bottlenecks like pipelines and force a lot of output offline. Let’s dig in by first going over what’s at stake for Shell. read more

The Next Big Offshore Boom Is About To Happen Here

Say what you will about offshore oil and gas exploration, but it’s still alive and kicking—high production costs and all. The latest demonstration of the viability of deepwater projects, even in the post-2014 oil industry era, comes from none other than Brazil.

On Wednesday, the country’s National Petroleum Agency put 287 oil and gas blocks up for auction, and only 37 found buyers. Too few, it might seem at first. But the proceeds came in at more than US$1.2 billion—a hefty share of this pledged by heavyweight Exxon. The NPA’s expectations for the proceeds were much more modest, at $157 million. read more

Shell takes cautious approach to green energy transition

by Andrew Ward, Energy Editor: 1 Oct 2017

Mr van Beurden, chief executive of Shell, allows himself only the briefest self-congratulation. “All the milestones, we are either ahead or on track,” he tells the Financial Times, referring to targets set at the time of the takeover. “But you are never done in this industry because everything is always in continuous decline.” The Dutchman is talking about the relentless pressure to find new resources… FULL ARTICLE

Lower for longer oil prices vs higher, sooner

by : Sunday 1 Oct 2017

To clarify Ben van Beurden’s point, he was not forecasting that oil would be “lower forever”; he meant that Shell should be operating with the mindset that it might be. If you are a risk-averse oil producer, that makes sense. Oil consumers should probably likewise be thinking about the possibility that prices could be higher, sooner.

FULL FT ARTICLE

Shell explores electric vehicle charging, energy management businesses

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 / 8:20 AM

AMSTERDAM, Sept 28 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell is working on developing new energy technologies like ‘smart’ electric vehicle charging and models to reduce customers’ energy use, the head of the oil company’s new energies division is set to say on Thursday.

Shell intends to invest up to $1 billion a year through its New Energies division by the end of the decade as the oil company adjusts to an energy market that is moving towards more electrification, decentralised energy use and cleaner fuels. read more

Shell CEO van Beurden says oil prices will be around $60 by the end of the decade

  • It would not be “unreasonable” to forecast oil at $60 a barrel at the end of the decade, said Royal Dutch Shell CEO Ben van Beurden
  • Oil supply was more unpredictable than demand, van Beurden added

| : 27 Sept 2017

It’s “not unreasonable” to expect oil prices at $60 a barrel by the end of the decade, Royal Dutch Shell CEO Ben van Beurden told CNBC’s “Managing Asia.”

To be sure, that’s not a large rise from current levels.

Brent crude rose 0.38 percent to trade at $58.66 a barrel in Wednesday Asia trade, after hitting a 26-month high on Tuesday, while U.S. crudewas higher by 0.5 percent at $52.14 at 12:00 p.m. HK/SIN. read more

Top BP Executive Warns OPEC Needs to Prolong Oil Output Curbs

OPEC and its allies need to extend their crude production cuts beyond March 2018 to rebalance the global oil market, a top executive at BP Plc’s trading arm said.

“Rebalancing is already on the way,” Janet Kong, Eastern Hemisphere Chief Executive Officer of integrated supply and trading at BP, said in an interview in Singapore. But OPEC needs “definitely to cut beyond the first quarter” to bring inventories down and back to historically normal levels, she said.

The view from BP follows a gathering in Vienna by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its partners that concluded with no decision on an extension or deepening of supply cuts. Oil has struggled to hold above $50 a barrel in 2017 as investors weighed signs of a whittling worldwide crude glut against concerns the U.S. will boost oil production. read more

Iran Says OPEC Action on Output Cuts Must Address Libya, Nigeria

OPEC’s commitment to cutting production to clear a global glut is working, but the group needs to address rising output from Libya and Nigeria, Iran’s Oil Minister Bijan Namdar Zanganeh said. 

Compliance with the output cuts is “acceptable,” Zanganeh told reporters in Tehran. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries should focus on “the situation with Libya and Nigeria,” he said, referring to the two countries exempted from capping production due to their internal strife. read more

Why $55 Brent Is Big News For Shell

: Sept 21, 2017

Summary

  • Checking out high-yielding Royal Dutch Shell plc.
  • Brent bouncing up to over $55/barrel is big news that I think has been under-reported in the financial media.
  • Overview of Shell’s finances and significance of higher Brent prices.

In light of material increases in realized upstream prices and an improving downstream sector, Royal Dutch Shell plc’s (NYSE:RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) financials have shown tremendous improvement this year. The worst of the downturn is behind the oil sector, but keep in mind crude prices remain range-bound. That being said, with Brent (global oil benchmark) back over $55/barrel (high end of the range), things are looking brighter and brighter for Royal Dutch Shell every day. Especially when it comes to fully covering Royal Dutch Shell plc Class A and Class B shares’ lofty 6+% yields. Let’s dig in. read more

Will Shell’s Gas Gamble Pay Off?

By Cyril Widdershoven – Sep 16, 2017, 6:00 PM CDT

Supermajor Royal Dutch Shell has decided to divest its Iraqi oil assets in a move to focus on its future in natural gas.

The industry giant is seemingly breaking from its oil heritage to head full speed into the “Golden Age of Gas.” Shell’s decision to leave Iraq’s upstream oil assets is not without risk, however, as the market for natural gas is even more oversupplied than it is for crude oil.

Reuters reported the move first, based on a letter from the Iraqi ministry of oil, followed by a confirmation from Shell. The Dutch heavyweight indicated to the press that its oil asset divestment in Iraq is in line with its strategy to focus more on natural gas and downstream activities. read more

Shell Targets Alternative Fuel Stations

By Tsvetana Paraskova – Sep 12, 2017, 12:30 PM CDT

Shell—one of the oil majors that is increasingly betting on natural gas and low-carbon fuels—is targeting 20 percent of its global fuel station sales to come from electric vehicles recharging and low-carbon fuels by 2025, John Abbott, Downstream Director at Shell, told Reuters in an interview published on Tuesday.

While Shell plans to expand fuel stations in China, India, and Mexico—where it sees growth in this market over the next decade—it would continue to focus on meeting demand for cars running on fuels alternative to gasoline and diesel, Abbott said. read more

Shell’s defence of big oil is too hopeful

September 11, 2017, 11:40:00 AM EDT By Reuters

By Andy Critchlow

LONDON, Sept 11 (Reuters Breakingviews) – Royal Dutch Shell, looking deeply into its crystal ball, sees a future that’s still heavily dependent on oil. The Anglo-Dutch giant expects crude will continue to play a major role in global energy supply for decades, even in its less oil-friendly scenario. That optimism goes someway to justifying the billions of dollars it continues to invest in exploiting new reserves and expanding its fuel network. But it’s also a view that may place too much faith in the combustion engine – and China staying with its current strategy. read more

Shell Is Nothing Short Of Exemplary

Earnings Forecast Focus: Sep. 5, 2017 6:49 PM ET

Summary

  • Shell CEO Ben van Beurden’s “lower forever” quote was aimed at operating costs and overall company culture. It does not reflect the CEO’s oil price outlook.
  • The company’s operational excellence has been nothing short of exemplary.
  • Scrip dividend will be removed when gearing is down to 20% from the current 25%.
  • At the current rate, it should take no more than twelve months to reduce the gearing to 20%.
  • Obviously, the dividend is safe. More importantly, this is an opportunity to buy a company with excellent leadership.

Royal Dutch Shell’s (RDS.A) (RDS.B) transformation under CEO Ben van Beurden has been truly remarkable. The relatively new CEO has put his mark on the company. He has shown that Shell, under his leadership, has the ability to navigate the downturn with relative ease. Not only that, he has shown the ability to transform a company when most other companies are busy trying to survive. While I won’t be spending much time on the dividend safety, as that has been made clear over and over again, it is safe to say that the 6.6% yield is beyond safe. Investors now have the opportunity to purchase a 6.6% yield with additional capital appreciation should oil rebound. read more

Shell’s Ben van Beurden: Oil vs Uber in the battle of reputations

In a throwaway comment, Ben van Beurden found himself front and centre on the national media’s radar. “It wasn’t a planned remark, it just came out,” he said.

Written by

But it wasn’t oil price, or strategy that landed him prime time interviews.

Instead, it was the comment that his next car would be electric.

“It wasn’t a planned remark, it just came out,” he said.

“But it shows how charismatic renewables and electricity is at the moment, much more charismatic than gas and definitely much more charismatic than oil.”

A perception that oil and gas have a shrinking role to play is one the industry needs to address head-on. read more

INTERVIEW-Electric cars and renewables not enough to meet Paris climate goal – consultant

Despite the rise in renewable energy, it is gas that will overtake oil as the world’s biggest energy source by 2034… This thinking underpinned, for example, Royal Dutch Shell’s $54 billion takeover of BG Group last year.

* World will miss Paris target under current projections

* Energy demand seen peaking around 2030

* Electricity output to rise 140 pct by 2050 

* Gas to overtake oil as main energy source by 2034

By Karolin Schaps

ARNHEM, The Netherlands, Sept 5 (Reuters) – The cost of electric vehicles (EVs) will fall to match those running on combustion engines by 2022, a key trigger that will mean by 2035 half of all passenger vehicles sold globally will be electric, according to the head of a top energy consultancy. read more

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