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Posts under ‘Oil Company Profits’

Oil Supermajors Dig Way Out of Doldrums as Cash Poised to Surge

by Rakteem Katakey: 26 April 2017, 00:01 BST

Big Oil’s struggle against crude’s collapse is starting to ease, giving some companies enough cash to pay shareholders without piling on more debt.

The world’s five biggest non-state oil producers, known as the supermajors, probably increased cash from operations by a combined 67 percent last quarter from a year earlier, according to HSBC Bank Plc analysts Gordon Gray and Kim Fustier. That may allow some to cover dividends and capital spending without borrowing for the first time since 2012, they said.

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Royal Dutch Shell: Unsustainable

Quad 7 Capital: Apr. 6, 2017 12:43 PM ET

Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) has been a name of controversy of late. Why? Well, this is an oil stock and oil prices have meandered. While shares are up substantially off of their multi-year lows seen a year ago, this stock still yields 7%. The dividend payment is the center of most controversy, with so many feeling it is unsustainable. That is what I keep hearing. Unsustainable. They tell me Shell is ‘unsustainable’ at $40 oil. They tell me the dividend is most certainly ‘unsustainable’ in the current climate. Some go so far as to say the entire oil industry is ‘unsustainable.’

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Despite cuts to jobs, spending, oil giants fail to cover costs

  • SARAH KENT
  • The Australian
  • 12:00AM April 4, 2017

The world’s biggest oil companies are struggling just to break even.

Despite billions of dollars in spending cuts and a modest oil price rebound, ExxonMobil, Royal Dutch Shell, Chevron and BP didn’t make enough money last year to cover costs, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis.

To calculate each companies’ free cash flow — the excess cash remaining after costs — the Journal deducted the firm’s dividends and capital expenditures from its cash from operations. All four firms fell short of cash flow for the year, although Exxon said it broke even by its own metrics, which exclude dividends. The analysis also showed that the four companies ended last year with more debt than they began it.

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Why Royal Dutch Shell plc should be worth £40 per share

Peter Stephens | Monday, 3rd April 2017

Shell (LSE: RDSB) has enjoyed a relatively prosperous recent period. Since the start of 2016, its shares have risen in price by around 42% as the outlook for the Oil & Gas industry has improved. However, there could be a long way to go until the company appears to be fully valued. In fact, a share price of £40 would not be excessive. This means there could be the potential for an almost 100% capital gain over the medium term.

Dividend strength

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As oil prices falter, fears return on BP and Shell dividends

FRIDAY, 31 MARCH 2017

LONDON: As they guided Europe’s largest oil companies through the industry’s worst slump in two decades, the bosses of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc had a simple message for investors: we’ll protect the dividend at all costs.

Not everyone is convinced they’ll be able to keep their word.

Even after they raised billions of dollars by cutting costs, selling assets and adding debt, cash is pouring out of both companies in the form of hefty shareholder dividends. Yields on those payments – which fell through 2016 as crude started to recover – have risen this year, typically a signal that investors fear a cut in payouts.

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FT: Shell’s top oil trader defends North Sea Brent activity


Mar. 29, 2017 12:57 PM ET|By: Carl Surran, SA News Editor

Royal Dutch Shell’s (RDS.A, RDS.B) VP of crude oil trading is out with a strong defense against accusations that the company’s activity in the North Sea crude market has skewed the benchmark Brent contract that underpins global oil prices.

Shell allegedly traded very aggressively in the region during 2016, with large positions in North Sea crude at times running contrary to clear signs of oversupply in the market, with the buying spree seen potentially pushing up prices.

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Big Oil Vows to Keep Dividends Up as Prices Falter

by Rakteem Katakey: 30 March 2017, 00:01 BST 30 March 2017, 11:40 BST

As they guided Europe’s largest oil companies through the industry’s worst slump in two decades, the bosses of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc had a simple message for investors: we’ll protect the dividend at all costs.

Not everyone is convinced they’ll be able to keep their word. Even after they raised billions of dollars by cutting costs, selling assets and adding debt, cash is pouring out of both companies in the form of hefty shareholder dividends. Yields on those payments — which fell through 2016 as crude started to recover — have risen this year, typically a signal that investors fear a cut in payouts.

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Shell’s top oil trader defends North Sea Brent activity

by: Anjli Raval, David Sheppard and Neil Hume in Lausanne

Royal Dutch Shell’s top oil trader has launched a staunch defence against accusations that the company’s activity in the North Sea crude market had skewed the benchmark that underpins global oil prices. Shell is alleged to have traded aggressively in the region last year, contributing to heavy losses among rivals…

FULL ARTICLE

Shell’s CEO Van Beurden total pay jumps in 2016

Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) said on Thursday its chief executive Ben Van Beurden saw his total pay jump 60 percent in 2016 to 8.263 million euros from 5.135 million a year earlier mainly due to deferred bonuses and share plans.

Van Beurden’s salary was little changed at 1.460 million euros and his bonus fell to 2.4 million euros from 3.5 million, however, from the company’s long-term incentive plan and deferred bonuses he received 4.381 million euros, up from 163,000 a year earlier.

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BP, Shell Investor Wants CEO Pay Policy Change After Revolt

by Rakteem Katakey:2 March 2017

The pay of bosses at Europe’s biggest oil companies is back in focus as shareholders prepare to scrutinize BP Plc’s new policy after rejecting Chief Executive Officer Bob Dudley’s remuneration last year.

Allianz Global Investors, among the top 25 holders of BP and Royal Dutch Shell Plc shares, wants the companies to base top executives’ pay and bonuses on per-share metrics rather than absolute numbers for cash flow and profit, said Rohan Murphy, an analyst at the investment firm. This will help align the management with shareholders’ interests and ensure profitability becomes more important, he said.

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Can BP plc and Royal Dutch Shell plc survive the coming oil price crash?

By The Motley Fool  Feb 15, 2017

Last year’s surprise OPEC and non-OPEC oil production cuts were supposed to herald a new area of higher energy prices, but it hasn’t really happened. Oil bulls who predicted oil could hit $60 or $70 a barrel will have been disappointed, with the price stalling around $55. If the price can’t rise now, when will it rise? Or could it even crash?

Oil slip

Any further slippage would spell bad news for FTSE 100 giants (LSE: BP) and Royal Dutch Shell(LSE: RDSB). They are banking on a higher oil price to keep the cash flowing, and ensure their dividends are sustainable in the longer run.

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3 big questions hanging over Royal Dutch Shell plc

The Motley Fool: 3 big questions hanging over Royal Dutch Shell plc

By The Motley Fool  Feb 14, 2017

A stagnating oil price has seen investor appetite for Royal Dutch Shell(LSE: RDSB) seep away from recent multi-year highs.

The crude colossus saw its share price strike its highest since November 2014 a month ago, but fresh fundamental fears have seen Shell — like many of its London-quoted peers — retrace more recently.

Shale producers returning

Arguably the biggest driver behind Shell’s decline has been a steady build in the US rig count.

With drillers across the Atlantic becoming ever-more-comfortable with oil prices anchored around the $50 per barrel mark, the number of units in operation has been steadily increasing since the autumn.

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Why I believe Royal Dutch Shell plc’s dividend looks safe despite falling profits

The Motley Fool: Why I believe Royal Dutch Shell plc’s dividend looks safe despite falling profits

Rupert Hargreaves | Monday, 13 February 2017

For much of the past three years, investors have continually questioned the sustainability of the Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) dividend payout as the price of oil has languished. 

Indeed, as the price of oil has fallen to its lowest level in over a decade, Shell has been paying out more than it can realistically afford to investors, filling the gap between income and spending with debt. For example, during 2015 the company paid a total dividend of $9.4bn to investors even though free cash flow after capital expenditure was only $4bn. Last year, including capital spending and the dividend, the company spent $10bn more than cash generated from operations.

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Shell’s strategy is not reliant on a certain oil price, CEO says

Shell CEO: Our goal is to be number one again  17 Hours Ago | 05:35

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Royal Dutch Shell may have seen its profits slammed thanks to low oil prices, but its CEO told CNBC on Tuesday that the company’s strategy isn’t reliant on a certain oil price outcome.

“We have to be competitive, rather, at every oil price level, and that means that we have to continue to work on reducing our breakeven price of the company, making sure that we have a competitive sense of projects with a low breakeven price per project so that every point in the price cycle we are competitive,” Ben van Beurden said in an interview with “Closing Bell.”

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OPEC Output Cuts End Big Oil’s Trading Bonanza

The oil-trading boom that cushioned the profits of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc through the price slump of 2015 and early 2016 is over.

BP said on Tuesday it made a “small” loss trading oil in the fourth quarter, while Shell last week said trading profits “flattened” in late 2016. The fall off in trading contributed to worse-than-expected fourth-quarter profits at Europe’s largest oil and gas producers.

Although better known for their oilfields, refineries and gas stations, Shell and BP are the world’s top energy traders, handling about 20 percent of global oil demand between them and dwarfing independent trading houses such as Vitol Group BV, Trafigura Group and Glencore Plc.

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Shell boss says stop viewing North Sea with ‘nostalgia’

Written by Lindsay Razaq, Westminster Correspondent – 03/02/2017 7:03 am

Shell boss Ben van Beurden today urged against looking at the North Sea with “nostalgia” – insisting plans to sell off assets in the basin do not signal the end of the energy giant’s involvement.

The chief executive conceded the company was streamlining its portfolio.

But he stressed the exit of larger firms from mature positions was positive from a North Sea perspective.

He also said it would give the sector a “new lease of life”.

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Shell To Sell Another $5B In Assets, Misses Profit Expectations

By Tsvetana Paraskova – Feb 02, 2017, 3:03 PM CST

Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.A) is making “significant progress” on selling another US$5 billion worth of assets, chief financial officer Simon Henry said on Thursday after the oil supermajor reported 2016 profits below analyst expectations.

Shell’s current cost of supplies (CCS) – a key measure comparable with net income – came in at US$1.8 billion, excluding identified items, compared with US$1.6 billion for the fourth quarter 2015, the company said today. Full-year 2016 CCS earnings attributable to shareholders excluding identified items dropped to US$7.2 billion from US$11.4 billion in 2015.

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Royal Dutch Shell is changing, CEO says

By Daniel J. Graeber: Feb. 2, 2017

(UPI) — Royal Dutch Shell continues to focus on an aggressive divestment strategy after cutting $15 billion from its books last year, its CEO said Thursday.

“We are gaining momentum on divestments, with some $15 billion completed in 2016, announced, or in progress, and we are on track to complete our overall $30 billion divestment program as planned,” CEO Ben van Beurden said in a statement.

The Dutch supermajor, trimmed down after a merger last year with British energy company BG Group, reported an 8 percent decline in profit last year for one of its weakest performances in more than a decade.

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Shell posts earnings of $3.5 billion in 2016; an 8% slide from $3.8 billion in 2015

Silvia Amaro | @Silvia_Amaro: 2 Feb 2017

Oil major Royal Dutch Shell posted fourth-quarter earnings of $1.0 billion, compared with $1.8 billion for the same quarter a year ago.

Ben van Beurden, chief executive officer of Royal Dutch Shell, said that such earnings figures do not “look good” for investors but he is “very pleased” with the performance for the full year as the company completed its merger with gas utility BG. Shares were 1.5 percent higher in early trade on Thursday.

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Royal Dutch Shell’s key earnings fall 44%

The results will disappoint investors who hoped for a stronger show of momentum on the back of higher oil prices and continues the choppy performance by Shell since its $50bn takeover of BG Group completed last year.

FULL FT ARTICLE

Shell boss Ben van Beurden delivered worse than expected full year results

Jillian Ambrose2 FEBRUARY 2017 • 8:55AM

Royal Dutch Shell has dashed investor hopes for a resurgence in profits after reporting disappointing earnings from its exploration and production business.

Europe’s largest oil company was expected to announce full-year profits double those of last year, but instead they fell 8pc to $3.8bn (£2.99bn),  their lowest level in over a decade.

The results came in well below City forecasts. Analysts had been expecting the company to make $8.17bn on a current cost of supplies (CCS) basis, a standard measure of profit in the industry.

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Shell is expected to report huge annual profit gains as oil prices recover

Recovering oil prices mean Shell will bag a huge profit compared with last year’s (Source: Getty)

Courtney Goldsmith: 29 Jan 2017

Royal Dutch Shell’s annual profits are expected shoot up following last year’s dramatic 80 per cent decline as oil prices continue to inch up.

The oil giant is forecasted to post a profit of $8.17bn (£6.51bn), more than double its profit of $3.8bn the previous year, the Telegraph reported.

The Anglo-Dutch business is also expected to announce the latest development in its drive to ditch $30bn worth of assets following its £35bn takeover of BG Group. Shell is predicted to report the $3bn sale of its North Sea oil and gas assets – almost half of its total assets worth $7bn in the North Sea – to a private-equity-backed explorer.

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Shell bounces back as oil price enjoys a slick resurgence

Shell bounces back as oil price enjoys a slick resurgence

Jillian Ambrose28 JANUARY 2017 • 7:00PM

Royal Dutch Shell is poised to lead a comeback this week as it reveals annual profits have more than doubled on the back of the recovering oil price.

The Anglo-Dutch oil giant is expected to post bumper profits of $8.17bn (£6.91bn), a huge jump on the $3.8bn it reported at the depths of the market downturn.

Alongside the profit boom, Shell is expected to announce the $3bn sale of its North Sea oil and gas assets to a private-equity-backed explorer.

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29 MORE reasons to sell BP plc and Royal Dutch Shell plc

By The Motley Fool  Jan 26, 2017

Those hoping that OPEC’s decision to finally curtail production at November’s Doha summit would go some way to balancing the oil market would no doubt have gasped at the latest US rig count data on Friday.

According to drill checkers Baker Hughes, the number of oil rigs up and running in the States rose by 29 during the seven days to January 20, taking the total to 551.

This was the largest one-week jump since April 2013 and means that the rig count has risen during 10 of the last 11 weeks. Meanwhile, the number of US rigs in operation now stands at a 14-month peak.

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Royal Dutch Shell: A Lot Of Debt

Brandon Dempster: Jan 19, 2017

Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) has a sizeable debt wall ahead of them. With nearly $20 billion in debt due over the next five years, this company is going to have to be firing on all cylinders in order to not just meet these principal repayments, but to generate enough cash flow to fund the sizeable dividend, boost capital expenditure per the company’s Q3 2016 guidance, and still remain in positive free cash flow territory. It’s important that investors take a tough look at the debt due this year and understand the company’s current liquidity position.

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Royal Dutch Shell Better Positioned as Oil-Producing Countries Begin to Reduce Output

January 04, 2017, 10:32:39 AM EDT By MT Newswires

Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) is in a better position as members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and other producers begin curbing production in a bid to boost prices, RBC researchers said in a note to clients on Wednesday.

“We believe the recent OPEC/non-OPEC supply deals have put the oil market on much firmer footing, which removes some of our tail-risk concerns for Shell,” the analysts said. “Looking ahead, we see the potential for strongly improving cash flow generation, while in the near term, we believe net debt should begin falling from its peak.”

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Shell Seeks to Streamline in 2017

…saddled with a mountain of debt…

By SARAH KENT: Jan. 3, 2017 7:00 a.m. ET

LONDON— Royal Dutch Shell PLC has a goal for 2017: Slimming down. The British-Dutch oil-and-gas giant bulked up in February with the roughly $50 billion acquisition of BG Group PLC, giving Shell a dominant position in liquefied natural gas and some of the world’s most prized offshore oil fields in Brazil. It also saddled the company with a mountain of debt—$78 billion at the end of the third quarter—that is higher than peers such as Exxon Mobil Corp.

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Sell Shell?

Royston Wild | Monday, 2nd January, 2017

Sell Shell?

It comes as little surprise that Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) has rocketed during the fourth quarter, the stock reaching 13-month peaks just last week on the back of the successful OPEC production accord. Shell gained 18% in total during October-December.

The Doha deal has been heralded as a game-changer in addressing the supply/demand imbalance washing over the oil market. And with no little reason. After all, OPEC is responsible for around 40% of global crude output.

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Royal Dutch Shell plc and BP Pay Higher Dividends: Here’s Why?

Britain’s decision to exit the European Union came as a shock for many. During the initial phase of Britain’s exit, the pound depreciated tremendously and questions were raised regarding how companies would operate. But now, a few months later, it seems that stakeholders of a few companies greatly benefitted from the move. 

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As mentioned above, the Brexit decision led to a significant decline of the pound against the dollar. Oil and gas companies such as the likes of Royal Dutch Shell plc. (ADR) (NYSE:RDS.A) and BP plc. (ADR) (NYSE:BP) decided to capitalize on the decline by giving out lucrative bonuses to their shareholders. 

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No Harm to Royal Dutch Shell plc (ADR) (RDS.A) Dividends

Published By: Myrna Salomon on December 27, 2016 09:41 am EST

For income savvy investors, a dividend yield of 6.95%, one of the highest in industry is certainly attractive. Having said this, Royal Dutch Shell plc (ADR) (NYSE: RDS.A) not only has such a lucrative yield, but also has history of sustaining it for the longest time.

The payout ratio is also appreciable, with company paying out dividend but retaining one third of its profits for future growth. On average, its reserves have increased by 3% on annual basis. This goes on to reflect that investors’ wealth is also increasing over time, along with company’s ability to grow consistently.

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Shell faces corruption charge threat

Marcus Leroux: December 23, 2016

Royal Dutch Shell faces possible corruption charges over the purchase of a Nigerian oil block.

The world’s second-largest private oil producer, and Eni, the Italian major, are being investigated over their 2011 purchase of an offshore block in Nigeria for $1.3 billion. Milan’s public prosecutor has wrapped up its investigation and Corriere della Sera newspaper reported that it intends to press charges.

The deal attracted criticism because only $210 million ended up in state coffers, with the rest going to Dan Etete, a former energy minister, and his associates. On Tuesday Mr Etete and two others were charged with money laundering in Nigeria in connection with the deal. Mr Etete could not be reached but has maintained his innocence previously.

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Shell and BP’s UK dividend payments surge on weaker pound

Andrew Ward, Energy Editor

Royal Dutch Shell and BP have delivered a Christmas bonus worth almost £500m to UK shareholders because of the depreciation of the pound against the dollar since the vote to leave the EU.

Both UK oil majors have made quarterly payouts this month that were a fifth higher than a year ago due to their practice of setting dividends in dollars and paying them in sterling.

FULL FT ARTICLE

Shell Makes Cuts to Boost Returns

Allen Good7 December, 2016

With the BG acquisition in the books, Shell (RDSB) is embarking on the necessary steps to compete in a world of $60 a barrel oil.

Like the rest of the integrated group, Shell is working to reduce its cost base, which has become bloated during the past five years, by reducing headcount and improving its supply chain.

The integration of BG is integral to Shell’s efforts, as it holds the potential for $4.5 billion of cost-reduction synergies. Furthermore, the addition of BG’s low-cost production reduces Shell’s per-barrel operating cost, which ranked among the highest in its peer group. In total, Shell aims to reduce operating cost by 20% from 2014 levels by the end of 2016, with further reductions possible in later years.

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screen-shot-2016-12-05-at-16-34-00 By The Motley Fool  Dec 5, 2016

Today I’m looking at the critical reasons to sell out of Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB).

A drop in the ocean

The oil sector’s major players breathed a huge sigh of relief last week after OPEC — responsible for four-tenths of the world’s oil supply — confounded the expectations of many and agreed to cut its output.

Saudi Arabia brokered a deal that will see production fall by 1.2m barrels per day, to 32.5m barrels beginning in January. The news prompted Brent oil to top the $55 per barrel marker for the first time since the summer of 2016.

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Shell is ‘ripe to deliver’ and 2017 is an inflection year – broker

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Jamie Ashcroft: 01 Dec 2016

Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s (LON:RDSB) portfolio is ‘ripe to deliver’, according to JP Morgan, which rates the stock as ‘overweight’ and sees 2017 as an inflection year for the oil supermajor.

JP Morgan analyst Christyan Malek says investors should buy ahead of further capex cuts and free cash flow uplift.

In a note Malek said: “the recent Brazil field trip left us incrementally positive on scope to cut capex further in 2017-18 as economies of scale on cost improve and internal efficiencies take effect.

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Shell jobs axed as report warns on future for oil market

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Wednesday 16 November 2016

Shell is to axe its Glasgow operation with the loss of 380 jobs as a new report warns of a “boom/bust” cycle in the oil industry.

The cuts are in response to the low oil price – which is already hurting the Scottish economy amid thousands of job cuts in North Sea production.

Shell said the decision to close its finance operation in Glasgow, which will take place by 2018, came about as it was taking “difficult choices” in order to remain competitive.

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Trump’s victory could hurt Royal Dutch Shell plc’s future

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By The Motley Fool  Nov 14, 2016

Donald Trump’s views on climate change may provide a boost to oil production in the US. He stated in his campaign that the US was being disadvantaged by rules and regulations aimed to prevent (or at least slow down) climate change. This could signal a more positive attitude from the US government towards oil and gas companies over the medium term.

Although there’s no certainty that Trump will follow through on his campaign policies when he becomes President, it seems likely that he’ll be less positive about battling the effects of climate change than Barack Obama. This could be bad news for Shell(LSE: RDSB).

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Trump energised

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By Ed Crooks, November 11, 2016

“Between a battle lost and a battle won, the distance is immense and there stand empires,” said Napoleon. The same is true of elections.

Donald Trump may have come slightly behind Hillary Clinton in the popular vote for the presidency, but his convincing victory in the electoral college will give him the ability to reshape the energy industry in the US and around the world.

His hand will be strengthened by Republican control of Congress. Parts of Mr Trump’s agenda will face resistance in Congress, but his energy policy is unlikely to be one of those areas. His support for oil, gas and coal, his commitment to deregulation and his rejection of climate policy are all well aligned with mainstream Republican thinking.

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FT: Western oil companies reach $5B deal with Nigeria

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Nov. 8, 2016 10:23 AM ET|By: Carl Surran, SA News Editor

Nigeria’s government has reached an outline settlement to resolve a dispute with western energy firms that would pay the companies $5B to cover exploration and production joint venture costs in the country, Financial Times reports.

Nigeria’s petroleum minister tells FT that Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B), ExxonMobil (NYSE:XOM), Eni (NYSE:E), Chevron (NYSE:CVX) and Total (NYSE:TOT) accepted the settlement of costs incurred during 2010-15, and hopes a deal can be finalized by year-end.

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This bad news should encourage you to avoid Royal Dutch Shell plc!

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By The Motley Fool  Nov 7, 2016

Deal in danger

My bearish view on Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) hasn’t improved over the weekend, either, following news of fresh bickering between OPEC members.

On Monday, OPEC’s Mohammed Barkindo was forced to deny that the wheels are not falling off its much-lauded supply freeze agreement, with the group’s secretary general announcing that all 14 member states remain committed to the deal.

But rumours that Saudi Arabia vowed late last week to raise its own production, should members fail to rubber-stamp the deal this month, negates any suggestion of cross-cartel unity. Some members like Iran have been exempted from cutting, or even holding, their own production, causing other group members to publicly call for similar exemptions. The political and economic ramifications of getting an agreement over the line are clearly colossal.

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Royal Dutch Shell: The Comeback Is Here

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Alpha Investor: Sunday Nov 6, 2016

Summary

  • Shell posted a massive turnaround in its bottom line last quarter on the back of an improved production profile, lower costs, and higher price realizations.
  • Shell’s financial improvement is set to continue going forward as upstream oil price realizations will continue to improve on the back of a positive demand-supply environment in the oil industry.
  • Oil demand has exceeded supply by 500,000 bpd this year and the trend will continue as the likes of Russia, Saudi Arabia, and the U.S. continue to reduce output.
  • Shell’s focus on lowering both operating and capital costs will allow it to attain break-even point even if oil prices remain at $50/barrel, which will also improve cash flow.

On Tuesday last week, Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) reported impressive results for the third quarter. In fact, Shell was able to achieve a major turnaround in its bottom line performance, posting a profit of $1.4 billion as compared to a huge loss of $6.1 billion in the same quarter last year. This impressive turnaround in Shell’s bottom line was a result of an increase in production as compared to the prior-year period, driven by the acquisition of BG that led to a favorable production mix in the upstream segment.

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Oil chiefs under fire over ‘pathetic’ new climate investment fund

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Emily Gosden, energy editor: 4 NOVEMBER 2016 • 7:53PM

Oil giants including BP and Shell have been pilloried by climate campaigners after disclosing their annual contributions to a much-hyped new green investment fund would be less than BP chief Bob Dudley earned last year.

Mr Dudley and Royal Dutch Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden were among industry heavyweights who appeared at an event in London to announce plans by the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI) to invest $1bn in “innovative low emissions technologies” over the next ten years.

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Hold the champagne

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screen-shot-2016-11-03-at-14-50-16By Ed Crooks, November 4, 2016

If you are looking forward to the oil industry recovery, you shouldn’t break out the champagne just yet.

Over the past eight days, the world’s largest listed oil companies have released third quarter earnings reports. From all of them, the message was that while the worst might be over, they were still facing a long hard road ahead.

The snap reactions from the stock market were mixed: positive for  ChevronRoyal Dutch ShellTotal and ConocoPhillips; negative for ExxonMobilBPEniStatoilPetrochina and Cnooc.

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Royal Dutch Shell’s Realistic View On Oil Shows Why It Is The Best Oil Major

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screen-shot-2016-10-20-at-23-00-27Nov. 4, 2016 4:19 AM ET

Summary

  • Royal Dutch Shell CFO Simon Henry just forecast that global demand for oil could peak within the next 5 to 15 years and then decline.
  • This is surprising coming from an oil company executive, and runs counter to typical industry projections such as ExxonMobil’s that demand will grow 20% by 2040.
  • Shell will shift their focus to natural gas, biofuels, and hydrogen, in order to be “the energy major of the 2050s”.
  • I like Shell’s perspective a lot: It gives them multiple paths to success. Of course they will still be just fine if oil demand does keep growing.
  • But if Shell is right, they will be ready and their management decisions over the next 5 to 15 years will be two steps ahead of everyone else’s.

On its earnings conference call this week, Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE: RDS.A) (NYSE: RDS.B) made a suprising commentary on its perspective for the global oil market over the next two decades: Its CFO Simon Henry forecast that global demand for oil could peak within the next 5 to 15 years and then decline.

Such an apparently pessimistic and bearish forecast is not what you usually expect to hear from a major oil company executive, to say the least. As the article pointed out, ExxonMobil’s (NYSE:XOM) annual outlook makes a more typical projection for the industry: about a 20% increase in global oil demand from 2014 to 2040.

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BP plc and Royal Dutch Shell plc aren’t out of the woods just yet

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By Ian Pierce – Friday, 4 November, 2016

It’s been a good few weeks for investors who kept faith in oil majors’ ability to survive slumping prices. First there was the OPEC supply cut agreement made in Algeria and then Q3 earnings season rolled around and included a slew of positive trading updates. (LSE: BP) posted a $1.6bn replacement cost profit, a 34% jump from last year’s number. And Shell (LSE: RDSB) earned $1.4bn on a current cost of supplies basis, a long way from the $6.1bn loss recorded this time last year.

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Oil stand-off threatens dividends at BP and Shell amid fears that a deal to prop up prices is about to collapse

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By SABAH MEDDINGS FOR THE DAILY MAILPUBLISHED: 23:34, 1 November 2016 | UPDATED: 23:34, 1 November 2016

Dividends at BP and Shell are set to come under threat as fears grow that a deal to prop up oil prices is about to collapse.

The two oil giants yesterday reported better-than-expected results – and gave a boost to their millions of small shareholders by protecting payouts.

But they have only been able to keep their dividends after slashing billions of pounds in costs following a collapse in the oil price from $112 a barrel in 2014 to less than $30.

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Shipping to become ‘major new sector’ for LNG: Shell

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by Angela Macdonald-Smith: 2 November 2016

Demand for LNG as a ship fuel has emerged as a much needed new source of growth in the oversupplied market, with oil giant Royal Dutch Shell giving a bullish assessment of the impact of tighter international rules on maritime emissions.

Shell’s head of integrated gas Maarten Wetselaar told investors in London that between shipping and trucking, the transport sector had become “a major new sector” for the LNG market.

The shipping market and the heavy trucking market together represent about 750 million tonnes of potential LNG demand, about three times the current global LNG supply, Mr Wetselaar said. He signalled that last week’s announcement of new rules on emissions from shipping had made Shell more positive on demand from the sector, noting it was an area where the competition was oil rather than cheap coal.

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BP And Shell Optimistic The Market Is Turning

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screen-shot-2016-11-01-at-16-01-19By Nick Cunningham – Nov 01, 2016, 6:23 PM CDT

BP and Royal Dutch Shell reported their latest financial figures for the third quarter and both companies showed some improvement, a sign that the oil markets are starting to find their footing.

A few days ago, some of the other oil majors released third quarter earnings, revealing the ongoing damage being done to the balance sheets of even the largest oil companies. But BP and Shell offered some reasons for optimism for the industry.

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Royal Dutch Shell’s Q3 Earnings: Good, but Not As Great As Some Have Declared

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Tyler Crowe: (TMFDirtyBird): Nov 1, 2016

It seems that now when an oil company’s earnings increase, financial pundits say it “rocketed” upwards or some other hyperbole like that. Sure, Royal Dutch Shell’s (NYSE:RDS-A) (NYSE:RDS-B) third-quarter results were better than the past few quarters thanks to the BG Group deal, but the devil’s in the details. Let’s take a look at the company’s results and why they improved, as well as peek into Shell’s near-term future as 2017 comes into focus. 

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Shell’s Record BG Deal Starts to Pay Off as Production Surges

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screen-shot-2016-11-01-at-16-01-19By Rakteem Katakey: November 1, 2016

Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s biggest takeover, the subject of intense investor scrutiny during crude’s collapse, is starting to pay off as Europe’s largest oil company chalks up its highest profit in five quarters.

The cash now generated by BG Group Plc — acquired by Shell for $54 billion in February — outstrips its spending, while production has risen by about a third in two years, Shell Chief Financial Officer Simon Henry said Tuesday. The integration of its assets has been completed “well ahead of time,” he said.

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