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Posts under ‘LNG’

Shell sees oil demand peaking by late 2020s as electric car sales grow

By Ron Bousso and Karolin Schaps

LONDON, July 27 (Reuters) – The world’s oil consumption could peak as early as the end of the next decade as electric vehicles become more popular, Royal Dutch Shell Chief Executive Ben van Beurden said on Thursday.

The prospect of a decline in oil consumption after more than a century of growth as the world switches to burning cleaner fuels is gathering pace. On Wednesday Britain announced plans to ban diesel and gasoline vehicles by 2040, following a similar move by France. read more

Shell nears finishing line with $30billion divestment programme

Shell nears finishing line with $30billion divestment programme

Shell has completed more than 80% of its $30billion divestment programme.

Written by

The supermajor announced this morning that it had shed assets worth $25billion as part of the reshaping of its portfolio.

This included the landmark North Sea deal with Chrysaor earlier this year, worth around $3.8billion.

It also comes following the $68.2billion merger with BG Group.

The supermajor also recently agreed to sell its stake in Irish gas project Corrib in a deal worth up to 1.23 billion US dollars (£956 million).

The firm said adjusted earnings rose from 1.05 billion US dollars (£800 million) to 3.6 billion US dollars (£2.7 billion), an increase of 245%. read more

EU warns U.S. it may respond swiftly to counter new sanctions on Russia

A list prepared by the EU executive, seen by Reuters, shows eight projects including those involving oil majors Anglo-Dutch Shell, BP and Italy’s Eni that risk falling foul of the U.S. measures. EU officials warn the U.S. measures would also hit plans for the LNG plant on the Gulf of Finland in which Shell is partnering with Gazprom.

Alissa de Carbonnel: 26 July 2017

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – The European Union warned on Wednesday that it was ready to act within days to counter proposed new U.S. sanctions on Russia, saying they would harm the bloc’s energy security.

Sanctions legislation overwhelmingly approved by the U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday has angered EU officials: they see it as breaking transatlantic unity in the West’s response to Moscow’s annexation of Crimea from Ukraine in 2014 and its support for separatists in eastern Ukraine. read more

Report: Gas could be sidelined by renewables in parts of Australia

Royal Dutch Shell, meanwhile, announced its Prelude vessel, a first-of-a-kind ship designed to process LNG off the coast of Western Australia, arrived at its destination after leaving a South Korean shipyard in June. With LNG emerging in market share because of its diverse deliverability options, Shell said the Prelude floating LNG vessel opens up new export opportunities.

By Daniel J. Graeber: 26 July 2017

July 26 (UPI) — With Australia monitoring natural gas demand, a consultant group found gas-fired power could get squeezed out in parts of the country as renewables get cheaper.

A research project from Wood Mackenzie, in coordination with GTM Research, found that wind, solar and battery costs might decline enough to the point that, by 2025, they’re competitive with gas-powered plants. For batteries in particular, whose costs are expected to decline by as much as 50 percent over the next decade, the researchers found storage capacity will be enough to meet the region’s peak residual demand. read more

Malaysia’s Petronas scraps $11.4-billion LNG project in B.C.

CALGARY and OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail

Published

Last updated

Malaysia’s Petronas has cancelled plans for an $11.4-billion liquefied natural gas terminal on the B.C. coast, a major blow to Canada’s efforts to become a global LNG supplier.

The move to scrap the Pacific NorthWest LNG plant, which had been slated for Lelu Island near Prince Rupert, comes after five years of study, a period in which LNG prices fell as other countries such as Australia and the United States started up multibillion-dollar facilities. read more

In Australia, Shell signals new era for LNG

In Australia, Shell signals new era for LNG

By Daniel J. Graeber: July 25, 2017

July 25 (UPI) — The arrival of a floating liquefied natural gas facility off the coast of Australia signals a milestone for the region as an energy hub, Royal Dutch Shell said.

The company’s Prelude vessel, its first-ever floating platform for LNG, arrived off the coast of Western Australia, after leaving its South Korean shipyard in late June.

Large for a floating facility, it’s one-quarter the size of an equivalent inland plant. With LNG emerging in market share because of its diverse deliverability options, Shell said the Prelude FLNG vessel opens up new doors in new countries. read more

Shell’s Prelude FLNG vessel reaches gas field site in Australian waters

EBR Staff WriterPublished 25 July 2017

Royal Dutch Shell’s Australian subsidiary has confirmed the arrival of the Prelude floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) facility in Australian waters from South Korea.

The 488m-long FLNG facility began its journey from the Samsung Heavy Industries (SHI) shipyard in Geoje to Australia in late June to reach the offshore Prelude gas field, located about 475km north-north east of Broome in Western Australia.

According to Shell Australia, the floating facility will extract and liquefy gas from the Prelude gas field prior to its export to the company’s customers around the world. read more

Chinese appetite for LNG increasing

By Daniel J. Graeber: July 24, 2017

July 24 (UPI) — The Chinese appetite for liquefied natural gas increased more than 30 percent from last year, according to the latest government data.

The Chinese General Administration of Customs reported LNG imports to China increased dramatically as the country looks to rely less on coal for its energy needs. First half demand was up 38.3 percent from last year.

“The growth rate is higher than the 21.2 percent increase registered in the same period last year, partly encouraged by the lowering policy barriers for LNG from the United States to enter the Chinese market,” the official Xinhua News Agency reported. read more

Shell sells controversial Corrib gas project

Áine Ryan: 18 July 2017

IT was always about ‘sovereignty’ for retired teacher and one of the Rossport Five, Vincent McGrath. So last week’s news that Shell is in the process of selling the controversial Corrib Gas project reminded him of the lines from the War of Independence poem, Shanagolden:
“These hills are at peace again, the Saxon stranger gone.”

Speaking to The Mayo News yesterday (Monday), Mr McGrath, who with four other local men spent 94 days in jail in 2005 for flouting an injunction allowing Shell onto their lands, said: “For me it was always about sovereignty and the health and safety of our community and our Government ceded this to Shell and thus failed in their primary duty to protect their citizens in Erris.” read more

How Europe’s Monster Gas Field Turned Into a Monster Headache

By Kelly Gilblom and Fred Pals: 13 July 2017

Judge to consider demands to close Europe’s largest gas field

Groningen has contributed almost 300 billion euros to budget

What was once a blessing is now an expensive curse

Officials are also considering criminal charges against NAM executives

Ebe Treffers’s dog was antsy for hours before the boom sounded and the house began to shake, scattering dishes across the kitchen floor.

Like other residents of the Groningen region near The Netherlands’ North Sea coast, the retired art teacher was used to the subtle tremors caused by decades of extraction at Europe’s largest gas field. But nobody was prepared for the magnitude 3.6 earthquake that struck after dark on Aug. 16, 2012, assured by both state and project officials that there was nothing to fear. read more

Corrib gas timeline: 20 years of protests and controversy

12 July 2017

Energy company Shell has sold its 45 per cent stake in the Corrib gas field to a unit of Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB) in a deal worth $947 million (€830 million).

Below is a timeline of the controversial gas field’s past.

1996 – Corrib gas field discovery declared by Enterprise Energy Ireland Ltd, which submitted plans to pump it ashore and build an onshore refinery in north Mayo.

2001 – Government petroleum lease granted for Corrib field

April 2002 – Corrib acquired by Shell, which became lead developer with Norwegian company Statoil and Marathon. read more

Critics argue for Groningen shutdown at Dutch court hearing

Jul. 13, 2017 2:59 PM ET|By: , SA News Editor

Angry Dutch residents living near the huge Groningen gas field told a hearing today at the Netherlands’ highest court that production should be totally stopped, accusing oil companies of causing minor earthquakes and the government of lying.

The Council of State is holding two days of hearings to consider appeals against a government plan to cut production at the field by an additional 10% starting Oct. 1.

Gas production company NAM, a joint venture between Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) and Exxon Mobil (NYSE:XOM), has accepted responsibility for damage caused by the quakes, for which it is paying more than €1B. read more

Dutch court hearing pits Big Oil against Groningen locals

Bart H. Meijer: JULY 13, 2017 / 12:59 PM

THE HAGUE, July 13 (Reuters) – Angry Dutch residents living near the huge Groningen gas field demanded a total halt to production, accusing oil giants of causing house-damaging earth tremors and the government of lying at a hearing in the Netherlands’ highest court on Thursday.

Two days of proceedings at the Council of State is considering appeals against a government plan to curb production at the massive field by an additional 10 percent from Oct. 1. read more

Losses on Corrib near €2bn as Shell sells up

Losses on Corrib near €2bn as Shell sells up

It had been beset by more than a decade of delays and rows with protesters before production began.

Gavin McLoughlin: 

The Corrib gas field has left Shell and its partners in the project with losses running to the best part of €2bn to date.

Shell announced yesterday it was exiting the project in a deal worth potentially as much as €1.08bn, selling its 45pc stake in the project to a Canadian pension fund, Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB).

The deal – which is expected to complete next year – will see Shell take an impairment charge of around $350m (€307m) and write off $400m (€350m) in historical currency movements that have impacted on its valuation of the asset. read more

Canadian pension fund bullish as Shell pulls plug on Corrib stake

Shell’s disillusionment with the Corrib investment, where protests and opposition delayed production by more than a decade…

13 July 2017

No doubt, Shell is glad to see the back of the Corrib natural gas field, even if it is on track to lose about €1 billion on 15 years of heavy investment in the controversial project.

The sale of its 45 per cent interest in the gas field off the Mayo coast to the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB) for €830 million is part of a $30 billion (€26.3 billion) asset sale programme by the Anglo-Dutch group as it seeks to cut its $90 billion debt pile following its takeover of smaller UK rival BG Group early last year. read more

Little surprise in north Mayo over Shell sale of Corrib share

Barrington’s report highlighted Shell’s policy of employing former public officials, former gardaí and former journalists – “giving rise to the appearance that Shell is seeking to influence those who regulate them”.

Lorna Siggins: 12 July 2017

Royal Dutch Shell’s proposed sale of its major share in the Corrib gas field came as little surprise to residents in Erris, Co Mayo whose views are still divided on the multibillion euro project.

After years of acrimony and protest the first delivery of gas from the field was taken in December 2015 and the project was formally opened the following month. This was some 20 years after the gas discovery was reported off the north Mayo coast.

Rossport farmer Wilie Corduff, who was one of five men jailed indefinitely over opposition to the project’s high pressure pipeline route, said the decision by Shell came “16 years too late, as the damage to the community is done”. read more

Shell Sells Irish Gas Field Stake for $1.2 Billion to Canada Pension Fund

LONDON—Royal Dutch Shell PLC has sold its stake in a controversial Irish gas field for up to $1.23 billion to one of Canada’s biggest pension funds, but the deal will result in a $350 million impairment charge, the company said Wednesday.

Shell the development of the Corrib gas field, located in the Atlantic Ocean about 52 miles off the coast of rural County Mayo.The field began pumping in 2015 after years of delays. WSJ ARTICLE

Shell to exit upstream business in Ireland with $1.23 billion stake sale

(Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell is to sell its 45 percent stake in the Corrib gas venture to a subsidiary of Canada Pension Plan Investment Board for up to $1.23 billion, marking the oil company’s exit from the upstream business in Ireland.

The deal includes an initial consideration of $947 million and additional payments of up to $285 million between 2018-2025, subject to gas price and production, Shell said in a statement on Wednesday.

The transaction will result in an impairment charge of around $350m, which will be taken in Q2, 2017, Shell said. read more

Prelude

Shell Mulls LNG-Hub Network as Use by Ships and Trucks Expands

By Rakteem Katakey: July 11, 2017

(Bloomberg) — Royal Dutch Shell Plc, the oil company that spent more than $50 billion to buy natural-gas producer BG Group Plc, is looking to expand demand for the fuel in transport to ensure its output is consumed.

Shell is studying developing a global network of liquefied natural gas supply hubs for vehicles including ships, Steve Hill, executive vice president for gas and energy marketing and trading, said Monday at the World Petroleum Congress in Istanbul. read more

Qatar LNG flows unaffected by crisis: Shell

COMMODITIES | Mon Jul 10, 2017 | 9:26am EDT

Qatari exports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) remain stable amid ongoing tension between the world’s biggest LNG exporter and its neighbors, an executive for Royal Dutch Shell said on Monday.

“LNG flows remain stable, cargoes are going into the market,” said Steve Hill, Executive Vice-President for Gas and Energy Marketing and Trading at Shell, one of the world’s biggest LNG traders.

“Qatar is a very credible and competent LNG producer,” Hill said at an industry event in Istanbul. read more

Qatar signals LNG price war for market share in Asia

U.S. and European oil majors such as Royal Dutch Shell and Chevron have invested huge sums over the last decade – often more than they have spent on oil – in an attempt to dominate the LNG market, especially through mega-projects in Australia such as Chevron’s Gorgon or Shell’s Prelude.

By Henning Gloystein and Mark Tay | SINGAPORE

Qatar’s plan to boost liquefied natural gas (LNG) output by 30 percent is the opening shot in a price war for customers in Asia pitting the Gulf state against competitors from the United States, Russia and Australia.

Qatar, facing regional isolation in a diplomatic dispute with its Gulf neighbors, took energy markets by surprise on Tuesday when it said it would raise its LNG production to 100 million tonnes per year – equivalent to a third of current global supplies – within the next five to seven years. read more

Jaw-dropping numbers behind the Shell Prelude, as the world’s biggest boat sails towards WA

Staff on board the Prelude.Picture: Shell Australia

Peter Milne: Sunday, 2 July 2017

Containing as much steel as 36 Eiffel Towers and spanning three times the length of the oval at Perth Stadium, Shell’s Prelude floating LNG facility will cut an imposing figure even in the vastness of the open seas between Asia and Australia.

The world’s biggest vessel was last night continuing on it journey from South Korea to its new home, 475km north-east of Broome.

It’s jaw-dropping scale presented more than a few headaches for engineers but the main difficulty was not accommodating the vessel’s girth, it was dealing with how close its crew would be to the millions of tonnes of gas that Prelude would process. read more

Shell’s floating LNG facility sets sail from South Korea for Australia

Royal Dutch Shell’s Prelude floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) ship has left a shipyard in South Korea for its destination offshore northwest Australia, the company said on Thursday.

Shell’s $12.6 billion Prelude project is expected to start operating next year, the company said, after long delays since the oil major first decided to go ahead with the project in 2011.

Once the facility arrives in Australia, it will be secured to the seabed by mooring chains before it can be connected to the gas field and start operating, Shell said. read more

Shell finally sets the Prelude, largest floating gas facility ever built, on course to waters off WA coast

By Babs McHugh: 30 June 2017

The largest floating natural gas facility ever built has left Korea bound for waters off the north west of Western Australia.

The Prelude is the first floating liquified natural gas (FLNG) facility commissioned by Royal Dutch Shell, and it means the company will not have to pipe gas onshore for processing.

All extraction, refining, production and offloading of the LNG will be undertaken on the vessel, which will be moored over the Browse Basin, 475 kilometres off the coast of Broome. read more

Shell, Korean gas co. ponder LNG partnership with Energy Transfer Partners

South Korean gas company and Royal Dutch Shell are considering throwing their weight behind yet another liquefied natural gas plant.

Energy Transfer Partners announced on Thursday that Korea Gas Corporation and BG LNG Services, a Houston-based subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell, are interested in working with the Dallas pipeline giant on its Lake Charles LNG Liquefaction Project.

The Lake Charles project in Louisiana is wholly owned by Energy Transfer and its entities. The company expects to build on its existing regasification import facility there. read more

Shell’s Floating LNG Facility Sets Sail From South Korea for Australia

LONDON — Royal Dutch Shell’s Prelude floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) ship has left a shipyard in South Korea for its destination offshore northwest Australia, the company said on Thursday.

Shell’s $12.6 billion (9.72 billion pounds) Prelude project is expected to start operating next year, the company said, after long delays since the oil major first decided to go ahead with the project in 2011.

Once the facility arrives in Australia, it will be secured to the seabed by mooring chains before it can be connected to the gas field and start operating, Shell said. read more

Shell’s Prelude LNG vessel sets sail

The world’s biggest vessel – Shell’s Prelude floating LNG platform – has left the South Korean port where it was built, bound for waters off the North West.

Tug boats began towing the 488m Prelude out to sea early this morning from Samsung Heavy Industry’s Geoje shipyard, according to a website monitoring vessel movements.

Prelude was being towed by Terasea Hawk, Tereasea Falcon and Terasea Osprey, the MarineTraffic website showed.

The facility will be deployed off the North West coast to extract and process gas from the Prelude and Concerto gas fields. read more

Gas crisis lures Shell to energy trading

by Matthew Stevens: 28 June 2017

Royal Dutch Shell has established a new energy trading business in Australia and has already started work on mitigating the growing political risk of supply-side failure in the liquid natural gas drained east coast gas market.

Shell Energy Australia recently signed its first gas supply contract with a Victorian customer and the plan is to trade actively in Australia’s domestic gas and electricity markets.

The immediate plan is that traders based in Melbourne and Brisbane will bypass existing market structures to deliver gas and electricity to, initially at least, commercial customers up and down the east coast. read more

Shell Seeks Gas Converts Among Indian Textile, Cement Plants

Royal Dutch Shell Plc is turning to India’s textile, cement and steel factories as it seeks to expand demand for its natural gas.

The Hague-based energy giant has set up a team of about six executives to identify small businesses that use dirtier fuels like coal and convince them to switch, according to Ajay Shah, a vice president with the company’s Asia unit. Shell, which will import the fuel as liquefied natural gas, is betting these users will account for a significant part of India’s gas demand growth, which it estimates will expand fivefold in 15 years. read more

Russia’s Pipeline Play Has Eastern Europe On Edge

By Gregory Brew – Jun 27, 2017, 4:00 PM CDT

Russia has been a major energy supplier to the European market for decades, and is looking to expand its dominance with a new pipeline that could feed natural gas directly to the continent’s biggest economy.

A deal on Nord Stream 2, a gas pipeline that will link the Ust-Luga area west of St. Petersburg directly with Germany, was signed by Russian energy giant Gazprom in late April. If completed, the pipeline would give Russia more than fifty percent of the Germany gas market and potentially increase its share of markets throughout Central and Western Europe. The pipeline is set to be completed in 2019 and is supported by joint-funding from five European energy companies, including Royal Dutch/Shell, Uniper and ENGIE. read more

China pumps cash into African floating LNG projects in strategic push

The $12.6 billion Prelude project, which is due to start operating off Australia in 2018, is typical of those conceived during the era of high energy prices.

By Oleg Vukmanovic and Colin Leopold | LONDON

China plans to pour almost $7 billion into floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) projects in Africa, betting on a largely untested technology in the hope that energy markets will recover by the time they start production in the early 2020s.

Western banks are wary due to the depressed state of the shipping and gas markets, as well as the technical difficulties of pumping gas extracted from below the ocean floor, chilling it into liquid form on a floating platform and transferring it into tankers for export. read more

India’s LNG-led gas market may grow over 6 times by 2030: Royal Dutch Shell

Shine Jacob  |  New Delhi  June 22, 2017 Last Updated at 15:47 IST

Global oil major says that India may see at least six times growth in by 2030 from the current levels. It adds that liquefied natural gas (LNG) may be the largest contributor to it. The prediction comes at a time when India is trying to increase the share of gas in the overall energy mix to over 15 per cent by 2030. read more

Qatargas to deliver up to 1.1 mln tonnes of LNG per year to Shell


Ben van Beurden, Shell’s chief executive officer, said. “We look forward to working with Qatar Petroleum to increase the availability of LNG as a fuel for transport.”

Sat Jun 17, 2017 7:09am GM

DUBAI, June 17 (Reuters) – Qatargas said on Saturday it had signed a sales and purchase agreement with Shell for the delivery of up to 1.1 million tonnes of liquefied natural gas (LNG) per year for five years.

The agreement will start in January 2019 and will be for the supply of LNG from Qatar Liquefied Gas Company Limited (4) (Qatargas 4), a joint venture between Qatar Petroleum which holds 70 percent and Shell with the remaining 30 percent. read more

Shell to cash in $10bn from divestments in second half

Written by

Biraj Borkhataria of RBC Capital Markets said the influx should go towards reducing the oil major’s debts and act as a clear catalyst for outperformance.

The Anglo-Dutch energy giant’s net debt currently stands about $72billion and Shell wants to shave off about $20billion to reduce gearing − the level of a company’s debt related to its equity capital − to around 20%.

Shell is in the midst of a push to sell $30billion worth of assets between 2016 and 2018 to rebalance its books following its takeover of BG Group. read more

Gazprom and Shell CEO’s sign JV agreements

By New Europe Online/KG

Royal Dutch Shell and Russian gas monopoly Gazprom have signed two agreements on the Baltic liquefied natural gas (LNG) project.

Gazprom CEO Alexey Miller and Shell CEO Ben van Beurden signed the agreements at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum 2017 on June 3.

The first agreement to sign a joint venture, which will secure financing for and carry out the design, construction and operation of the LNG plant in the Leningrad Region. Based on that concept, Gazprom and Shell will take further steps in the implementation of the Baltic LNG project. read more

Shell diverts U.S. LNG cargo to Dubai after Qatari diplomatic row

Thu Jun 8, 2017

Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) has sent a replacement cargo of liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the United States to Dubai, shipping data shows, after a diplomatic row disrupted typical trade routes from Qatar, the world’s biggest producer.

Shell has a deal to supply the Dubai Supply Authority (DUSUP) with LNG which it typically sources from Qatar because of its proximity.

But bans on Qatari vessels entering ports in the United Arab Emirates, imposed after top Arab powers severed diplomatic and transport links with Qatar on Monday, meant it had to source the LNG from elsewhere. read more

Shell Canada budget drops by half a billion dollars after oilsands sale

The Canadian Press Published Tuesday, June 6, 2017 2:22PM EDT

CALGARY – The president of Shell Canada says his capital budget will shrink by about half a billion dollars this year following the sale of most of its oilsands assets in a deal that closed last week.

Michael Crothers says it will be about $1.5 billion this year, down from over $2 billion in 2016, but the Canadian branch remains an important part of Royal Dutch Shell’s global operations.

He said in an interview the company’s sale of oilsands assets to Canadian Natural Resources (TSX:CNQ) means it will now concentrate on its shale oil and gas properties in B.C. and Alberta, along with its refining and chemical businesses near Edmonton and its proposed West Coast LNG project. read more

Gazprom, Shell review LNG opportunities

By Daniel J. Graeber: May 30, 2017

May 30 (UPI) — Russian energy company Gazprom said it signed agreements with Royal Dutch Shell that could expand on bilateral deals related to liquefied natural gas.

Gazprom Chairman Alexei Miller hosted delegates from Shell at his Moscow office to discuss future collaboration on projects covered under strategic cooperation agreements from 2015.

Gazprom holds a 50 percent stake in the Sakhalin liquefied natural gas project on Russia’s far eastern coast, while Shell controls a 27.5 percent stake. Japanese companies hold the remaining interest. read more

Gazprom and Shell discuss joint prospects under Agreement of Strategic Cooperation

Royal Dutch Shell is a British-Dutch oil and gas company focused on hydrocarbon production, processing and marketing in over 90 countries worldwide.

Gazprom and Shell are jointly engaged in the Sakhalin II project, which includes Russia’s only active LNG plant. The Sakhalin II operator is Sakhalin Energy Investment Company Ltd. (Gazprom – 50 per cent plus one share, Shell – 27.5 per cent minus one share, Mitsui – 12.5 per cent, and Mitsubishi – 10 per cent). In 2015, Gazprom and Shell signed the Memorandum to construct the third production train of the LNG plant, as well as the Agreement of Strategic Cooperation providing for the expansion of the companies’ joint project portfolio, including a potential asset swap. read more

Shell-BG Merger Benefits Becoming More Clear

: May 8, 2017

When I decided to position for a coming oil price recovery towards the end of 2015, I decided on buying Shell (NYSE:RDS.A), alongside Suncor (NYSE:SU) and Chevron (NYSE:CVX). My investment strategy always has a longer term horizon, therefore Shell was an obvious choice, given the very generous dividend. When deciding to hold a stock for a number of years, it really makes a difference, as long as the dividend is sustainable, of course.

There were other factors which I saw as positive long term prospects that makes Shell stock worth holding on to for a while. Shell’s leadership in the LNG sector, in large part thanks to the BG deal is one of the things that attracted me to the stock. As I stated many times before, I believe that natural gas will eventually become the number one energy source on the planet and as such it will have to become more flexible in terms of delivery. LNG shipments will most likely become a globally strategic industry, which is likely to grow a lot in coming years and decades. read more

Shell’s $390m asset write-off casts doubt on CSG reserves

: Resources reporter: Melbourne: 2 MAY 2017

Shell has written off $390 million worth of newly acquired coal-seam and other gas exploration and evaluation ground associated with the Queensland Curtis LNG plant at Gladstone because of poor drilling and testing results.

Raising more questions over long-term production from Queensland coal-seam gas fields that are supposed to feed Gladstone’s three gas-hungry LNG plants for the next 20 years, the writedowns were revealed as part of $1.2 billion of impairments logged this month in local accounts for Shell’s Queensland subsidiaries. read more

Fibre, wi-fi keep most Shell Prelude staff onshore

By Ry Crozier Apr 24, 2017

Implementing a subsea fibre optic link to underpin automation and remote monitoring aboard Shell Australia’s forthcoming Prelude floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) platform means it will only need to fly people out to the plant “by exception”.

The Prelude project is being closely watched by the LNG sector as a potential model for future gas extraction from increasingly remote offshore fields.

Prelude’s operations will be monitored remotely from Shell Australia’s collaborative work environment (CWE) in Perth, which acts as the company’s main operations centre. read more

Tanzania Drafts $30B LNG Export Project Deal

Tanzania’s government has prepared a draft agreement with international oil companies willing to take part in a $30-billion LNG export project, and has sent the draft for ministerial review, local media reported on Wednesday, citing a senior official at the Ministry of Energy and Minerals.

State-run Tanzania Petroleum Development Corporation (TPDC) is partnering with ExxonMobil, Statoil, Ophir, and Shell in developing an LNG project that would allow the country to export gas from its offshore resources. read more

Shell claims low-carbon edge

On Monday, reports surfaced that some of Shell’s money circulating in Nigeria was used for payoffs.

April 12 (UPI) — One of the largest oil companies in the world, Royal Dutch Shell said Wednesday it was focused on a low-carbon strategy that was geared toward long-term growth.

Shell highlighted its movement through a changing energy landscape in a sustainability report on activities last year. Chief Executive Officer Ben van Buerden said in the report that lower crude oil prices and a global community coordinated around the U.N.-backed Paris climate agreement meant changes were necessary for the oil and gas business. read more

Shell’s QGC to sell gas to Orica, Engie as trims LNG exports

Shell’s QGC to sell gas to Orica, Engie as trims LNG exports

Shell has signed two new deals to supply gas to east coast buyers in response to mounting pressure on the Queensland LNG exporters not to let industrial customers on the east coast go short.

The short-term agreements to supply gas to Orica and power producer Engie mean that Shell’s LNG venture in Gladstone will trim LNG exports to make more available for local users, said the oil major’s new Australia chair, Zoe Yujnovich.

However Shell wouldn’t disclose its revised forecasts for LNG exports from its $25 billion Queensland Curtis venture which typically ships about eight cargoes a month from its 8.5 million tonnes a year Curtis Island plant. read more

Shell to fuel world’s first LNG-powered Aframax oil tankers

Published April 5, 2017, 10:01 PM

By Reuters 

Dubai – A unit of Royal Dutch Shell will fuel the world’s first LNG-powered Aframax crude oil tankers under a deal signed with Russian shipping company SCF Group (Sovcomflot).

Shippers are looking to liquefied natural gas (LNG) to help them meet stricter emissions regulations in 2020.

Oil tankers are “another marine segment embracing the benefits of LNG fuel,” Maarten Wetselaar, Shell’s integrated gas and new energies director, said in an announcement released on Monday. read more

Shell Plans to Tap Gas Hunger in Emerging Energy Demand Center

by Saket Sundria and Debjit Chakraborty: 5 April 2017, 11:46 BST

Royal Dutch Shell Plc plans to boost its gas marketing business in India and may expand its import capacity for the fuel as it seeks to tap the country’s demand-growth potential.

The Anglo-Dutch company is aiming to sell imported natural gas directly to users such as power utilities, fertilizer makers, petrochemical plants and city gas distributors, said Shaleen Sharma, head of upstream development in India. Shell has also set up a team in Singapore to look for opportunities to ship more liquefied natural gas to India, he said. read more

LNG producers turn to trading, risk taking to maintain market share

* Large volume, long-term contracts now “more difficult” -Shell

* JERA, Total sign deal with flexible volumes, spot prices

* Woodside, Shell see big opportunity in small-scale LNG

By Osamu Tsukimori

CHIBA, Japan, April 5 Producers of liquefied natural gas (LNG), having shot themselves in the foot with oversupply, and facing calls for flexibility and greater competition from other fuels are taking on more risk and learning to trade, just like any other commodities dealers.

That’s a big change for a market long dominated by large producers such as Royal Dutch Shell and BP which provide major importers with fixed volumes under multi-decade contracts linked to the price of oil. read more

Royal Dutch Shell strikes deal to offload its Hong Kong LPG business as $30bn sell-off programme rolls on

By Alex Sebastian For This Is Money10:59, 5 April 2017

Royal Dutch Shell has announced a deal to sell its liquefied petroleum gas business in Hong Kong and Macau to DCC Energy for $150.3million as it continues its $30billion asset sales programme.

The Anglo-Dutch oil major has been active in the two locations for close to 60 years and supplies services which help meet the needs of over 100,000 households. The business will continue to operate under the Shell brand.

Shares in Shell responded positively to the news, climbing 1.3 per cent to 2,127p Wednesday.  read more

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