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Posts under ‘Environment’

Big Oil’s Plan to Buy Into the Shale Boom

by Javier Blas: 21 March 2017, 10:26 GMT

Big Oil is muscling in on shale country.

Exxon Mobil Corp., Royal Dutch Shell Plc and Chevron Corp., are jumping into American shale with gusto, planning to spend a combined $10 billion this year, up from next to nothing only a few years ago.

The giants are gaining a foothold in West Texas with such projects as Bongo 76-43, a well which is being drilled 10,000 feet beneath the table-flat, sage-scented desert, and which then extends horizontally for a mile, blasting through rock to capture light crude from the sprawling Permian Basin.

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Shell adds hundreds of jobs in new unit focusing on alternative energy

LeAnne Graves

SINGAPORE // Shell has added hundreds of jobs to its New Energies division as it plans to expand further in alternative fuels, wind and solar, a company executive said.

The oil and gas giant created a new division last year that focuses on investing in hydrogen, biofuels, solar and wind. Mark Gainsborough, Shell’s executive vice president of new energies, said the division’s workforce has expanded to more than 200 staff as the company looks to invest in excess of US$1billion per year by 2020.

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The fossil fuel industry’s invisible colonization of academia

Benjamin Franta and Geoffrey SupranMonday 13 March 2017 

The event’s sponsor was Shell Oil Company. The producer of the film series was Shell. The film’s director is Vice President of a family-owned oil and gas company, and has taken approximately $300,000 from Shell. The host, Harvard Kennedy School, has received at least $3.75 million from Shell. And the event’s panel included a Shell Executive Vice President.

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Shell’s sale of dirty tar sands assets cleans up debt and spruces image

Adam VaughanSaturday 11 March 2017 15.59 GMT

hen Shell sold most of its Canadian tar sands operations last week, the Anglo-Dutch oil company took a modest step towards making good on its promise to be part of the solution on global warming, rather than the problem. But the $7.25bn (£6bn) sale of the majority of its tar sands assets to an independent Canadian oil company is less about the company cleaning up its image than about cleaning up its debt.

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Shell sells out of the oilsands. Was it climate or costs?

By Tracy Johnson, CBC News Posted: Mar 09, 2017 4:17 PM ET

Royal Dutch Shell’s deal to sell most of its stake in Alberta’s oilsands was in the works for more than a year, says the company’s chief executive Ben van Beurden.

“We said we would high-grade the portfolio,” he said at the CERAWeek energy conference in Houston.

“We would get out of positions where we do not have the scale or the capability, or that did not fit us in the longer run strategically. And the oilsands is one of them.”

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Shell CEO’s plan for a smaller carbon footprint

Patti Domm: 9 March 2017

Royal Dutch Shell‘s announcement of the sale of $7.25 billion in Canadian oil sands assets Thursday is an important step to turning itself into a company of the future — with a broader mix of energy assets and a smaller carbon footprint.

Shell CEO Ben van Beurden said the company is committed to reshaping itself and believes that renewables and new energy will play a bigger role. The company is retaining just 10 percent of its Canadian sands assets.

“We are right in the middle of transforming the company into the company of the future,” he said at the CERAWeek conference in Houston, sponsored by IHS Markit.

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Shell CEO urges switch to clean energy as plans hefty renewable spending

The oil and gas industry risks losing public support if progress is not made in the transition to cleaner energy, Royal Dutch Shell Plc (RDSa.L) Chief Executive Ben van Beurden said on Thursday.

The world’s second largest publicly-traded oil company plans to increase its investment in renewable energy to $1 billion a year by the end of the decade, van Beurden said, although it is still a small part of its total annual spending of $25 billion.

The CEO said that the transition to a low carbon energy system will take decades and government policies including putting a price on carbon emissions will be essential to phase out the most polluting sources of energy such as coal and oil.

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Shell cuts debt with US$7.25 billion sale of Canada oil sands

9 March 2017

TORONTO (BLOOMBERG) – Royal Dutch Shell will sell almost all its production assets in Canada’s oil sands in a US$7.25 billion (S$10.24 billion) deal that cuts debt and reduces involvement in one of the most environmentally damaging forms of fossil-fuel extraction.

The company will sell all of its oil-sands interests apart from a 10 per cent stake in the Athabasca Oil Sands mining project, The Hague-based Shell said on Thursday (March 9). It will also continue as operator of the Scotford upgrader and Quest carbon capture and storage project.

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Shell’s CEO Van Beurden total pay jumps in 2016

Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) said on Thursday its chief executive Ben Van Beurden saw his total pay jump 60 percent in 2016 to 8.263 million euros from 5.135 million a year earlier mainly due to deferred bonuses and share plans.

Van Beurden’s salary was little changed at 1.460 million euros and his bonus fell to 2.4 million euros from 3.5 million, however, from the company’s long-term incentive plan and deferred bonuses he received 4.381 million euros, up from 163,000 a year earlier.

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Shell Fears Reopening Twice-Bombed Nigerian Pipeline

By Zainab Calcuttawala – Mar 06, 2017, 4:40 PM CST

Royal Dutch Shell fears that reopening a pipeline in Nigeria will cause local separatist groups to re-bomb the facility for a third time, according to reports emerging from the area.

The Trans Forcados Pipeline, which takes 400,000 barrels to the Forcados export terminal every day, has been out-of-operation for all but three weeks in the past year, according to risk analysis published by SBM intelligence on Friday.

Previously, militants dove underwater to install bombs near the section of the pipeline in the Atlantic Ocean that they aimed to destroy. Shell brought in underwater engineers to repair the pipeline in an act of defiance against the militants and their most sophisticated attack to date.

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How Nigeria Created the Insecurity in Ogoniland and How to Deal with It

This post is the opinion of Fegalo Nsuke, Publicity Secretary of The Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People (MOSOP).

The disharmony between Nigeria and the Ogoni people over oil may be a familiar terrain, the recent and heightened security situation in Ogoni may no longer be news. But what may not be well known is how the Nigerian government significantly contributed to the current insecurity involving armed bandits in Ogoni.

In the past one month, I have toured all parts of Ogoniland. From Nyokhana, to Ken-Khana, Gokana, Bori special area, Tai, Eleme and Ban Ogoi special area. Despite the largely inflated insecurity problem, it was glaring that there was little, insignificant Police presence in the Ogoni.

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Pawnee Nation Sues Oklahoma Oil Companies in Tribal Court Over Earthquake Damage

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS: MARCH 4, 2017

OKLAHOMA CITY — A Native American tribe here has filed a lawsuit in its own tribal court system accusing several oil companies of causing an earthquake that damaged near-century-old tribal buildings.

The Pawnee Nation alleges in its lawsuit filed Friday that wastewater injected into wells operated by the defendants caused the 5.8-magnitude quake in September. The tribe is seeking compensation for damage to public and personal property and market value losses, as well as punitive damages.

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Nigeria wants Shell to open major pipeline but attack feared

By MICHELLE FAULThe Associated Press: March 4, 2017

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Nigeria wants Royal Dutch Shell to reopen one of its main pipelines but the oil multinational is resisting, analysts say, for fear it could once again be bombed by militants.

The Trans Forcados Pipeline, the main feed to the 400,000-barrel-a-day Forcados export terminal, has been shut for all but three weeks of the past year, Lagos-based SBM Intelligence said in its weekly risk analysis published Friday.

In their most sophisticated attack, militants used divers to blow up an underwater section of the pipeline in the Atlantic a year ago. Defying militant death threats, Shell flew in underwater engineers who took seven months to get the pipeline operational.

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On board Shell’s Prelude barge, the world’s biggest vessel

PAUL GARVEY: Resources reporter, Perth: 4 March 2017

The biggest vessel the world has ever seen is in the final stages of preparation ahead of its maiden voyage to its permanent home off Australia’s northwest coast.

Royal Dutch Shell’s revolutionary Prelude floating liquefied natural gas facility — 50 per cent longer and six times the weight of the world’s largest aircraft carrier — is deep into the commissioning process at a shipyard in Korea, with the 120 Australians who will man the vessel already on board to familiarise themselves with the monster.

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Shell and Exxon Knew, Norway Knows Too

GREENPEACE: Activists protesting Shell.

Norway has made billions from fossil fuels. Our US$900 billion Sovereign Wealth Fund – the world’s largest – has been harvested from nearly two decades of careful management of its oil wealth. But it’s time for Norway to turn its back on its oil-fuelled past, and embrace a different future.

On 28 February, the fund’s manager published data showing it had increased its holdings in oil majors during 2016 – companies including Shell, Exxon and the tar sands company Suncor.

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Shell Oil accused of ignoring climate threat known in 1991

By Valerie Richardson – The Washington Times – Thursday, March 2, 2017

The #ExxonKnew campaign never quite panned out as climate change activists had hoped, unless their goal was to see Exxon Mobil CEO Rex W. Tillerson sworn in as secretary of state. But that failure wasn’t enough to stop #ShellKnew.

Shell Oil came under fire this week from environmentalists after a Dutch blogger unearthed a 1991 video, “Climate of Concern,” produced by Shell warning of the possible consequences of climate change, prompting accusations that the company chose to ignore the situation in order to maximize profits.

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Shell “knew of climate change danger” since 1991 – Greenpeace response

Published by Greenpeace Southeast Asia: Thursday 2 March 2017

A film in 1991, produced by Shell, shows that the oil giant has long known about the catastrophic risks of climate change.

The film, titled Climate of Concern, was obtained by the Correspondent, a Dutch online journalism platform, and published in The Guardian’s article ‘Shell knew’: oil giant’s 1991 film warned of climate change danger.

In response, Desiree Llanos Dee, Climate Justice Campaigner for Greenpeace Philippines, said:

“Exxon knew. Shell knew. Now we must get to the bottom of what other fossil majors know and what they plan to do to avert catastrophic climate change. Shell’s empty rhetoric on climate is wholly contradicted by the core assumption underlying its business plans – global temperature increases in excess of 3°C and its lobbying against measures to mitigate climate change.

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In A 1991 Film, Shell Oil Issued A Stark Warning About Climate Change Risks

WASHINGTON — “Action now is seen as the only safe insurance.” 

That was among the many clear warnings that oil giant Shell issued in a film it produced about climate change more than 25 years ago. Many environmentalists, however, argue that the company has largely ignored its own alarm bells.

The 1991 film, “Climate of Concern,” resurfaced Tuesday on the Dutch online news outlet The Correspondent. It’s the latest in an ever-growing body of evidence that suggests the oil industry has long known about the climate risks associated with carbon dioxide emissions — and has actively worked to cover them up.

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SHELL ACCUSED OF IGNORING ITS OWN CLIMATE CHANGE WARNINGS FOR DECADES

By Janene Pieters on February 28, 2017 – 09:41

Dutch oil and gas giant Shell has known about the dangers of climate change for over 30 years, yet still continues to work with fossil fuels and does its best to frustrate an effective approach to the climate problems facing the world, according to a reconstruction done by De Correspondent and published on Tuesday.

The reconstruction is based on confidential internal documents and an investigation into Shell’s lobbying, NU.nl reports. For the reconstruction climate journalist Jelmer Mommers investigated Shell and its environmental policy for over a year. He spoke to dozens of Shell employees about how they perceive the future of the company. The full reconstruction, in Dutch, can be found here.

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‘Shell knew’: oil giant’s 1991 film warned of climate change danger

Damian Carrington and Jelmer Mommers: Tuesday 28 February 2017 

The oil giant Shell issued a stark warning of the catastrophic risks of climate change more than a quarter of century ago in a prescient 1991 film that has been rediscovered. However, since then the company has invested heavily in highly polluting oil reserves and helped lobby against climate action, leading to accusations that Shell knew the grave risks of global warming but did not act accordingly. But, despite this early and clear-eyed view of the risks of global warming, Shell invested many billions of dollars in highly polluting tar sand operations and on exploration in the Arctic.

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Hindenburg Memories Cloud Shell’s Vision of Hydrogen Future

by Jess Shankleman

28 February 2017, 00:01 GMT 28 February 2017, 08:27 GMT

Taxi driver Theo Ellis, the first person in Europe to drive Toyota Motor Corp.’s hydrogen-powered Mirai sedan for business, loves telling passengers about the technology that emits nothing but water.

They ask him about its costs, greenness, and the majority inquire about safety. To his passengers, the word “hydrogen” evokes memories of the Hindenburg, the airship that was destroyed in half a minute when it caught fire in 1937, or the H-bomb, a successor to what the U.S. dropped on Japan to end World War II.

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Boss Of Royal Dutch Shell In The UK Describes Trump’s Clean Energy Stance As ‘Disappointing’

The Huffington Post: Boss Of Royal Dutch Shell In The UK Describes Trump’s Clean Energy Stance As ‘Disappointing’

George BowdenReporter, The Huffington Post UK

The boss of Shell in the UK has labelled President Donald Trump’s stance on new, cleaner forms of energy as “disappointing”.

Asked whether Trump had cast doubt the need for a global transition to green energy, Sinead Lynch, country chair of Shell in Britain, told The Huffington Post UK: “It’s disappointing. Obviously what we really want is a collaboration and alignment across all governments internationally, regionally, locally.”

As part of a renewed on focus on fossil fuels Trump’s administration has promised to open new coal mines, deleted references to climate change from White House websites, and pledged to scrap Barack Obama’s 2013 climate pact.

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Shell Looks Beyond Dutch Waters for Offshore Wind Investments

by Jess Shankleman

22 February 2017, 14:23 GMT

Royal Dutch Shell Plc may contract to build offshore wind farms in the U.K. and across Europe, after winning a bid to build one of the cheapest projects on record last year, Shell U.K. chair Sinead Lynch, said in an interview.

Europe’s biggest oil supplier is exploring opportunities across Europe for offshore wind, Lynch said at a press event on Wednesday at a Shell service station outside London, where she was opening the company’s first U.K. hydrogen refueling station.

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Shell and Toyota Partner on California Fueling Stations for Hydrogen Cars

By Craig Trudell , Yuki Hagiwara , and John Lippert

20 February 2017, 20:30 GMT: 21 February 2017, 00:21 GMT

Royal Dutch Shell Plc will build seven fueling stations for hydrogen cars in California through a partnership with Toyota Motor Corp., laying down their latest bet on the demise of the internal-combustion engine.

The stations will nudge the state closer to its goal of having 100 retail sites by 2024 where hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles can fill up. The California Energy Commission is considering $16.4 million in grants toward the stations, with Shell and Toyota contributing $11.4 million.

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Shell Splashes $1B On Niger Delta Development

By Irina Slav – Feb 14, 2017, 12:46 PM CST

Shell’s Nigerian subsidiary has committed US$1 billion for the development of the Niger Delta, the Vice President of the federal government, Yemi Osinbajo, said. Osinbajo is on a tour in the Delta, aiming to appease through dialogue the militant groups that have crippled Nigeria’s oil industry over the last couple of years.

The money will be released in US$500-million annual installments, to be used to provide clean drinking water, conduct health impact assessments, and supply “remediation technologies” to local communities, who tried to sue Shell for failure to clean up an oil spill in the area. The case was heard by the London High Court, which ruled that it is outside its jurisdiction: Shell Petroleum Development Company is registered in Nigeria, so a Nigerian court should be the one to hear the case.

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Opposing views need to be heard

Timesonline.com: Opposing views need to be heard

The Times: Serving Beaver County, PA since 1874

By The Times Editorial Board

When Beaver County Commissioners Sandie Egley and Daniel Camp addressed a packed house Tuesday morning at the annual State of the County breakfast, the main topic on everyone’s mind was the Shell Chemicals Co. ethane cracker plant to be built in Potter Township.

Egley, when asked to describe the state of the county in one word, chose “exciting,” noting that everyone in the room knew what she meant.

Camp went with “radar,” saying that “Beaver County is on everybody’s radar” and that the area is going to become “the next up and coming place to raise a family.”

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Reefs, not removal, could be the future for rigs, says Shell

 

Emily Gosden, Energy Editor: 

Royal Dutch Shell’s chief financial officer has criticised rules requiring old oil and gas platforms to be removed from the North Sea, claiming that they will result in taxpayers “spending money unnecessarily”.

Simon Henry said that regulations enshrined in the international Ospar convention should be reviewed because they “could actually create more of an environmental issue by disturbing certain things in the removal process” and should be reviewed.

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Shell begins huge task of decommissioning Brent oil rigs

Adam Vaughan Energy correspondent

Monday 6 February 2017 07.01 GMT

When the company proposed sinking the Spar oil storage buoy in 1995, it prompted protests by Greenpeace, petrol boycotts in Germany and a falling share price. Shell was eventually forced to back down and find a more environmentally-friendly plan.

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Mayo council rapped on use of Shell funds

Valerie Flynn: Sunday February 5, 2017

An official audit has criticised Mayo county council’s management of an €8.5m fund provided by Shell for the benefit of the local community near the Corrib gas pipeline.

The council allocated €451,000 of the fund to itself, with allocations made by “evaluation boards that were either entirely made up of staff from Mayo county council, or the majority of members on the evaluation board were from Mayo county council”, the local government auditor said.

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Targets and victims of British undercover police operations in Ireland

Targets and victims of British undercover police operations in Ireland speak out, demand answers and action

—  Shell to Sea supports Jason Kirpatrick and other Core Participants in UCPI/Pitchford Inquiry  —

A press event jointly organised by Jason Kirkpatrick and Shell to Sea is scheduled for Buswell’s Hotel on Monday 06 February from 11.00am to 1pm.

Jason Kirkpatrick was a victim in Ireland of British undercover officer Mark Kennedy. Mr. Kirkpatrick is a former Deputy Mayor from Arcata, California, and is a “Core Participant” in the Undercover Policing Inquiry (UCPI) which covers England and Wales.

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Shell sell-off heralds ‘generational change’ in North Sea dawn

By DAVID SHANDPUBLISHED: 00:01, Wed, Feb 1, 2017

A “GENERATIONAL change” in North Sea oil and gas production was signalled yesterday after Shell sold a large chunk to private equity-backed exploration group Chrysaor in a £3billion deal.

The sale is part of Shell’s plans to dispose of £24billion of assets by 2018 to reduce its debts following its £35billion takeover of BG Group last year. 

Major producers like Shell are also withdrawing from the North Sea to focus on higher profit areas such as Brazil. 

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Shell and Total set to provide electric car charging ports at UK and Dutch garage forecourts

Written by Energy reporter – 30/01/2017 1:47 pm

Oil supermajors Royal Dutch Shell and Total are preparing to introduce battery charging points at European petrol stations as the the energy giants respond to rising sales of electric cars.

A selection of Shell’s filling stations across the UK and Netherlands will be the first to offer the service later this year, according to the Financial Times.

Total is said to be working on a similar move in a bid to capitlise on the emerging electric car market.

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Shell to install chargers for electric cars on European forecourts

by: Andrew Ward, Energy Editor: 29 Jan 2017

Royal Dutch Shell is preparing to introduce battery charging points at some European petrol stations… Shell’s filling stations in Britain and the Netherlands — the Anglo-Dutch group’s home markets — will be the first to offer the service later this year, according to John Abbott, its director of downstream business.

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Debevoise acts opposite Leigh Day on another pollution claim against Shell

Extracts from article published 26 Jan 2017

The Nigerians, represented by Leigh Day partners Daniel Leader and Martyn Day, will take the verdict to the Court of Appeal and expect it to be heard in the next six to ten months.

Leader said: ‘I am confident this will be overturned on appeal. ‘It is our view that the judgment failed to consider critical evidence which shows the decisive direction and control Royal Dutch Shell exercises over its Nigerian subsidiary,’ he added.

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UK Court Shuts Down Nigeria Oil Spill Case Against Shell

Oil major Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A) cannot be sued in London over Nigerian oil spills, the High Court ruled Thursday, heading off any future attempts to request British multinationals to take responsibility at home for their subsidiaries’ actions abroad.

The High Court adjudicated that the parent company has no legal responsibility for alleged pollution of fishing areas and farmland by its subsidiary in Nigeria.

“It was agreed by both parties that if my judgment was such that there was no arguable duty of care on the part of RDS to the claimants under English law, then there would not be any cause of action in common law under the law of Nigeria,” reads the conclusion of the judgment.

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UK: Shell ruling gives green light for corporations to profit from abuses overseas

26 Jan 2017

A UK High Court ruling that two Niger Delta communities devastated by oil spills cannot have their claims against Shell heard in the UK could rob them of justice and allow UK multinationals to commit abuses overseas with impunity, Amnesty International said today.

The High Court ruled today that Royal Dutch Shell cannot be held responsible for the actions of its Nigerian subsidiary Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nigeria Ltd. This is despite the company having profited from decades of abuses and environmental destruction in the Niger Delta. The communities are expected to appeal.

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Court rules villagers cannot sue Shell in London over Nigerian oil spill

By Karolin Schaps | LONDON

Oil major Royal Dutch Shell cannot be sued in London courts over Nigerian oil spill allegations, the High Court ruled on Thursday, dealing a setback to attempts to hold multinationals liable at home for subsidiaries’ activities.

If the High Court had ruled in favor of the two groups, other claimants against British-based multinationals could have been emboldened to pursue legal action through the British courts, some legal experts had said.

Villagers from the Bille and Ogale communities in Nigeria’s oil-rich Delta region were trying to pursue oil spill allegations against the company’s Nigerian subsidiary Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nigeria (SPDC) in British courts.

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UK court to rule if Nigeria Shell claims can proceed

By AFP PUBLISHED: 04:02, 26 January 2017

More than 40,000 Nigerians will on Thursday discover if London’s High Court can rule on their pollution claims against Anglo-Dutch oil giant Shell over spills in the Niger Delta.

Lawyers for the claimants are demanding action from Shell to clean up spills that have devastated their communities for decades, but the multinational argues that the claims should be heard in Nigeria.

The firm’s lawyer Peter Goldsmith told judge Peter Fraser during a hearing in November that the cases concerned “fundamentally Nigerian issues”, and shouldn’t be heard in London.

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Shitstorm of Nigeria related litigation hits Shell

Shell is facing what Americans might describe as a shitstorm of lawsuits arising from its Nigerian activities since the 1950’s. Litigation is current or pending in Nigeria, the USA, Italy, the UK and the Netherlands.

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‘It’s payback time,’ says Nigerian king suing Shell

James Rothwell25 JANUARY 2017 

Nigerian tribal king has accused oil giant Shell of pocketing “blood money” after leaking pipelines allegedly polluted his community’s drinking water with deadly diseases.

Emere Godwin Bebe Okpabi, who is the leader of Nigeria’s Ogale people, has taken the Royal Dutch Shell company to the High Court in London as he says they are responsible for the “devastating” pollution.

The court will rule on whether the case is under the UK’s jurisdiction on Wednesday. 

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UK: Shell ruling could give green light to corporations for abuses abroad

Spokespeople available for interview

On Thursday 26 January the UK High Court will rule on whether two Niger Delta communities whose environment and livelihoods were destroyed by oil spills can have their claims against Shell heard in the UK. The case could set a precedent for holding other UK-based multinationals to account for abuses committed overseas.

“This ruling will have wide-ranging implications for corporations based in the UK that abuse human rights abroad. If the court rules that the communities cannot have their case heard in the UK it would effectively be a green light for UK multinationals to profit from human rights abuses and environmental destruction around the world,” said Audrey Gaughran, Director of Global Issues at Amnesty International.

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Shell, Statoil make shortlist for US offshore wind licence

Written by Mark Lammey – 19/01/2017 6:00 am

The US Government said yesterday that it had cleared Shell and Statoil to bid for an offshore wind farm licence off North Carolina later this year.

The 122,405 acre Kitty Hawk licence will be offered in a commercial wind lease sale on March 16, the US Interior Department said yesterday.

Shell and Statoil are among nine companies to have made the shortlist.

Last month, Statoil said it had won an offshore wind lease off New York with a $42million bid.

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Potter Township gives final approval for Shell cracker plant

By Anya Litvak / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: 18 Jan 2017

Potter supervisors approved a permit Wednesday for Shell Chemical Appalachia to build a sprawling petrochemical complex within its borders, capping more than a month of tension among people who live near the plant site in Beaver County

The supervisors voted unanimously to approve a conditional use permit for the company during a standing-room-only meeting that saw both supporters and opponents speaking their minds in one-minute increments before the vote.

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Shell bolsters offshore wind interests with bid in U.S. tender

Royal Dutch Shell has been shortlisted by the U.S. government to make a bid for an offshore wind project license in the waters off North Carolina, as it comes under pressure from shareholders to diversify into green energy.

Shell, as well as Norway’s Statoil, qualified to participate in the upcoming leasing round offshore Kitty Hawk, the U.S. interior ministry said on Tuesday. The lease award is set for March 16.

Shell’s core business of producing oil and gas is reeling after more than two years of weak prices.

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Alleged crude oil theft: Court to hear $406.7m case against Shell

18 JAN 2017

Lagos – A Federal High Court in Lagos will on March 20 begin trial in a suit filed by the Federal Government against Shell Western Supply and Trading Ltd. over alleged crude oil theft.

The suit numbered FHC/L/CS/336/16 was filed by Federal Government’s counsel, Prof. Fabian Ajogwu (SAN).

Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nig. Ltd. and its subsidiary, Shell Western Supply and Trading Ltd. are defendants in the suit filed before Justice Mojisola Olatoregun.

Counsel to the plaintiff, Mr Charles Nwabulu, on Wednesday sought to withdraw and replace an application he filed earlier on the matter.

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Oil majors, car makers to push hydrogen technology to help cut emissions

Ben van Beurden, chief executive officer of Royal Dutch Shell, speaks during a news conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, February 15, 2016. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes

The heads of some of the world’s biggest oil firms and automakers agreed on Tuesday to push for broader global use and bigger investments in using hydrogen to help reduce emissions and arrest global warming.

The oil firms’ and car makers’ chiefs said the plan was part of global efforts to keep global warming well below 2 degrees Celsius, an ambitious goal agreed by 195 countries in Paris in 2015.

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Toyota, Shell Among Giants Betting $10.7 Billion on Hydrogen

by John Lippert: 17 January 2017, 21:00 GMT Updated on 18 January 2017, 00:23 GMT

Toyota Motor Corp. and four of its biggest car-making peers are joining oil and gas giants including Royal Dutch Shell Plc and Total SA with plans to invest a combined 10 billion euros ($10.7 billion) in hydrogen-related products within five years.

In all, 13 energy, transport and industrial companies are forming a hydrogen council to consult with policy makers and highlight its benefits to the public as the world seeks to switch from dirtier energy sources, according to a joint statement issued from Davos, Switzerland. The wager demonstrates that batteries aren’t the only way to reduce pollution from cars, homes and utilities that are contributing to climate change.

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Motiva Port Arthur refinery restarts gasoline unit: sources

Motiva Enterprises [MOTIV.UL] restarted on Monday the main gasoline-producing unit at its 603,000 barrel per day (bpd) Port Arthur, Texas, refinery, said sources familiar with plant operations.

A Motiva spokeswoman declined on Monday to discuss operations at the refinery.

The 81,000 bpd gasoline-producing Fluidic Catalytic Cracking Unit 3 was shut on Saturday when the system pumping catalyst into the unit malfunctioned, said the sources on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the matter.

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Opec outflanked

By Ed Crooks of the Finacial Times: January 13, 2017

In the 1930s many newspapers carried impressively detailed diagrams showing France’s defences along the German border, described by Popular Mechanix and Inventions magazine as the “world’s greatest underground fortifications”. By the end of May 1940, Hitler had demonstrated that while the Maginot Line might indeed be an engineering marvel, it was also irrelevant, as his panzer divisions swept past it through Belgium and into France. Last year’s agreement between leading oil-producing countries to curb their output had something of the same feel about it this week.

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Widow of executed activist wins access to documents in claims against Shell

Written by Reporter – 12/01/2017 3:31 pm

The widow of an activist executed after protesting against oil major Shell’s oil production in Nigeria has won access to legal documents.

They will be used in a legal case for damages against the oil giant which Esther Kiobel plans to pursue in the Netherlands.

It comes after a US judge told Shell’s US lawyers to handover the documents about Shell’s activities in Africa.

Kiobel has alleged Shell was complicit in the execution of her late husband, alongside author and environmental activist Ken Saro-Wiwa, by the Nigerian military in 1995 because it provided support and funding for the army in its crackdown of opposition to a Shell-led joint venture in the Niger Delta.

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