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Shell Canada’s SEEL Program Fund provides learning experiences beyond the classroom 0

Shell Canada’s SEEL Program Fund provides learning experiences beyond the classroom

Undergraduate students and representatives recognized at annual luncheon

By University Relations Staff: December 18, 2017

On Nov. 30, the University of Calgary hosted the 10th annual celebratory luncheon for a diverse group of students who participated in activities funded by the Shell Experiential Energy Learning (SEEL) Program.

Having just completed its 11th year, the SEEL Program at UCalgary provides funding to undergraduate students and groups for field trips, conferences, special projects and other activities focused on sustainable energy, environment and economy, with a priority placed on hands-on learning experiences. read more

A decisive step to a cleaner energy future

Chief Executive Officer at Shell

It’s time for Shell to accelerate its efforts in the transition to a lower-carbon world. This is how I plan to drive change through the company.

How will a future CEO of Shell judge what I have just announced? Will they look back to the end of 2017 and consider it a turning point? In 20 years? 30 years? If things move as I expect, they probably will.

By then, I believe Shell will be at least as profitable and successful as today but it will be a very different company.

We will still have plenty of oil and gas in our energy mix but other areas of the business, which are small today, will have grown. read more

Corbyn backs call for MPs’ pension fund to divest fossil fuels

John McDonnell and Jeremy Corbyn support Divest Parliament, a group trying to force the parliamentary pension fund to drop fossil fuel investments © AFP

, Chief Political Correspondent

The Labour leader and shadow chancellor have swung their support behind Divest Parliament, a group trying to force the Parliamentary Contributory Pension Fund to drop investments in fossil fuels, including a £5.6m stake in BP and £5m of shares in Royal Dutch Shell. FULL FT ARTICLE read more

U.S. oil majors fall behind on climate, European lead

Major European oil companies are making major efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to fight climate change. American majors are dragging their behinds.

Royal Dutch Shell pledged Tuesday to slash carbon emission by 50 percent and boost investment in clean, renewable energy. CEO Ben van Beurden promised to spend at least $2 billion on on wind power, biofuels and electric cars, about the same amount it will spend on shale oil.

“It is making sure that the products within society have an overall lower carbon footprint,” Beurden told investors, according to the Guardian newspaper. “That is the long-term way of making sure our business remains a relevant business in the face of the energy transition.” read more

Only collaboration will solve the global warming puzzle

BEN VAN BEURDEN: 30 NOVEMBER 2017

The world has a puzzle to solve, a jigsaw with a spectacular number of pieces to place. If it can succeed it will win a priceless prize: it will achieve the goal of the Paris Agreement, to limit global warming to under 2C. It is the puzzle of the energy transition.

Piecing together a solution is going to be tricky and we at Shell have been trying to make progress as a company. We have a way forward now and I am going to share it with you. But first, the jigsaw. read more

Shell, to Cut Carbon Output, Will Be Less of an Oil Company

By Nov. 28, 2017

Bowing to pressure from shareholders and the Paris international climate accord, Royal Dutch Shell pledged on Tuesday to increase its investment in renewable fuels and to cut its carbon emissions in half by 2050.

Shell and other big oil companies have moved only sporadically over the last decade toward greater production of wind and solar energy. Now there are signs of a commitment to take climate change more seriously.

In comments to investors, Ben van Beurden, Shell’s chief executive, said that from 2018 to 2020, the company’s new-energies division would spend up to $2 billion a year on renewable energy sources like wind, solar and hydrogen power and on electric-car charging stations. read more

Shell doubles up on green spending and vows to halve carbon footprint

Anglo-Dutch giant to spend $2bn on wind power, biofuels and electric cars as it bows to shareholder pressure by setting new company climate change target 

Shell has doubled its spending on clean power and bowed to shareholder pressure by promising to halve the carbon footprint of the energy it sells by 2050, as the oil giant said it was stepping up its ambitions on green energy.

FULL ARTICLE

Shell Updates Company Strategy and Financial Outlook

NEWS PROVIDED BY: Royal Dutch Shell plc

THE HAGUE, Netherlands, November 28, 2017 /PRNewswire/ —

  • Scrip dividend programme to be cancelled with effect from the fourth quarter 2017 dividend
  • Annual organic free cash flow outlook increased to $25 to $30 billionby 2020, at $60 per barrel (real terms 2016)
  • Company sets ambition to reduce the net carbon footprint of its energy products in step with societys drive to align with the Paris Agreement goals

Royal Dutch Shell plc (Shell) (NYSE: RDS.A) (NYSE: RDS.B) Chief Executive Officer, Ben van Beurden, today updated investors on the company’s strategy, setting out plans to grow returns and free cash flow, and outlining its ambition to reduce the net carbon footprint of its energy products.

“Our next steps as we re-shape Shell into a world-class investment aim to ensure that our company can continue to thrive, not just in the short and medium term but for many decades to come,” said van Beurden. “These steps build on the foundations of Shell’s strong operational and financial performance, and my confidence in our strategy and our ability to deliver on the promises we make.” read more

Shell petrol stations to charge up electric cars in just five minutes

Shell has teamed up with Ionity, which is backed by major carmakers, to roll out high-speed charging across 80 of Shell’s biggest European petrol stations CREDIT: PETER BYRNE/PA

Jillian Ambrose: 

Royal Dutch Shell has accelerated its drive into the electric vehicle market by teaming up with Europe’s fastest charging network.

The collaboration with Ionity, which is backed by major carmakers, will roll out across 80 of Shell’s biggest European petrol stations to allow drivers of the latest generation of electric cars to charge up in as little as five to 10 minutes. read more

Shell and carmakers aim to go the distance with highway charging

Ron Bousso: NOVEMBER 27, 2017

LONDON (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) has partnered with top carmakers to deploy ultra-fast chargers on Europe’s highways, stealing a march on rivals in the race to remove one of the biggest obstacles facing the electric car sector.

Shell’s agreement with IONITY – a joint venture between BMW (BMWG.DE), Daimler (DAIGn.DE), Ford (F.N) and Volkswagen (VOWG_p.DE) – will initially bring high-powered docks to 80 highway sites in 2019, it said in a statement. read more

WSJ: Oil companies, automakers seek lifeline for internal combustion engine

Nov. 20, 2017 12:42 PM ET|By: , SA News Editor

Exxon Mobil (NYSE:XOM), BP, Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) and other oil companies are spending millions of dollars per year working with automakers including Ford (NYSE:F) and Fiat Chrysler (NYSE:FCAU) to improve the internal combustion engine and help it compete with electric vehicles, WSJreports.

The companies are hoping new, thinner lubricants will help squeeze even more efficiency out of traditional car engines, allowing them to comply with stricter environmental rules and remain relevant as new technologies such as zero-emission electric vehicles emerge. read more

Shell coffee collaboration brewing on biofuel to help power London buses

Oil giant Shell has announced that it is working in collaboration with bio-bean and the coffee drinkers of London to power some of the city’s buses.

The B20 biofuel is partly made from waste coffee grounds and has been added to the London bus fuel supply chain without any great need for vehicle modification.

The fuel provides a cleaner, sustainable energy solution which will lower bus emissions in the UK capitol.

The average Londoner drinks 2.3 cups of coffee a day, producing over 200,000cubic tonnes of waste a year, much of which would otherwise end in landfill with the potential to emit 126million kg of CO24.

Arthur Kay, bio-bean’s founder, said: “Our Coffee Logs have already become the fuel of choice for households looking for a high-performance, sustainable way to heat their homes – and now, with the support of Shell, bio-bean and Argent Energy have created thousands of litres of coffee-derived B20 biodiesel which will help power London buses for the first time. It’s a great example of what can be done when we start to reimagine waste as an untapped resource.” read more

Shift to Hydrogen Could Meet 20% of World Energy Needs by 2050

Shell, Statoil and BMW among companies urging support for fuel

Transition requires investment of up to $25 billion a year

The most abundant element may supply almost a fifth of global energy by 2050 and eliminate enough emissions to cancel out all the pollution in the U.S., according to a group of industrial companies from Royal Dutch Shell Plc to Toyota Motor Corp.

Fuel-cell vehicles running on hydrogen, extracted from water using wind and solar power, may be used to power everything from cars to factories, according to the Hydrogen Council, a group that also includes the German automaker BMW AG, the mining giant Anglo American Plc and the French energy company Engie SA. The group estimated hydrogen has the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by about 6 gigatons a year, more than the 5.5 gigatons the U.S. released in 2016. read more

A billion US dollars poured into Royal Dutch Shell

One of the two funds poured a billion US dollars into Royal Dutch Shell, the Anglo-Dutch oil and gas company. The Shell Technology Ventures Fund then invested in ‘production and exploration’ technologies, such as innovative oil rigs. The universities have faced protests from staff and students over their investments in fossil fuels in recent years.

Oxford and Cambridge Universities have made secret investments into offshore funds, it was revealed last night. read more

Peak oil? Majors aren’t buying into the threat from renewables

Ernest Scheyder, Ron Bousso: NOVEMBER 8, 2017 HOUSTON/LONDON (Reuters) – Two decades ago, BP set out to transcend oil, adopting a sunburst logo to convey its plans to pour $8 billion over a decade into renewable technologies, even promising to power its gas stations with the sun.

That transformation – marketed as “Beyond Petroleum” – led to manufacturing solar panels in Australia, Spain and the United States and erecting wind farms in the United States and the Netherlands.

Today, BP (BP.L) might be more aptly branded “Back to Petroleum” after exiting or scaling back its renewable energy investments. Lower-cost Chinese components upended its solar panel business, which the firm shed in 2011. A year later, BP tried to sell its U.S. wind power business but couldn’t get a buyer. read more

Shell and BP connected pension funds ‘at risk’ from companies’ failure to adapt

A shareholder campaign group has said pension funds who have invested in BP and Shell are exposed due to the oil majors’ inaction on the low-carbon transition.

Written by

In its latest report, ShareAction, a non-profit organisation, said the companies’ business models look increasingly vulnerable to the threats posed by low-cost renewables and climate change policy.

The group said the oil majors had done little to mitigate these threats and lamented their lack of investment in low-carbon (BP, 1.3% of capital expenditure to Shell’s 3% of annual capex).

ShareAction said investors should “escalate” engagement with senior management, pressing them to set out their positions on climate legislation and their plans for “reducing total lifecycle emissions”. read more

Big Oil’s $1 billion fund backs new cement, engine technologies

OCTOBER 27, 2017

LONDON (Reuters) – A $1 billion fund created by top energy companies to curb climate change will back technologies being developed by U.S. cement maker Solidia Technologies and engine maker Achates Power, it said on Friday.

The Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI) was set up last year and includes Saudi Aramco and Royal Dutch Shell.

Solidia Technologies will receive funding for making cement with carbon dioxide instead of water, potentially lowering emissions by 70 percent and water use by 80 percent, the OGCI said. read more

BP and Shell planning for catastrophic 5°C global warming despite publicly backing Paris Climate Agreement

Neither company sets targets to reduce emissions and BP’s total investment in renewable and clean technologies has actually shrunk since 2005, the report said Getty Images

Companies are trying to ‘have their oil and eat it’ by committing to 2°C in public while planning for much higher temerpature rises, says shareholder campaign group, ShareAction

Oil giants Shell and BP are planning for global temperatures to rise as much as 5°C by the middle of the century. The level is more than double the upper limit committed to by most countries in the world under the Paris Climate Agreement, which both companies publicly support.

The discrepancy demonstrates that the companies are keeping shareholders in the dark about the risks posed to their businesses by climate change, according to two new reports published by investment campaign group Share Action. Many climate scientists say that a temperature rise of 5°C would be catastrophic for the planet. read more

Clock ticking down on deadline for Shell Springboard entries

Written by

Entrants will be competing for a green cash pot containing £350,000, with the national winner to receive £150,000.

A further five regional winners will each get £40,000 of no-strings attached funding.

They will also be given access to academics and investors whose advice can help grow their enterprises.

The cut-off date for applications falls on November 6.

Former winners include Edinburgh-based tidal energy technology developer Nova Innovation. read more

Planning for a green future

Zhang Xinsheng, executive chairman of Shell Companies in China. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Editor’s Note:

The Communist Party of China has just concluded its 19th National Congress in Beijing. In the runup to the meeting, China Daily asked business leaders from major multinational companies for their views on economic developments here and the country’s global leadership role.

China Daily: 27 October 2017

Zhang Xinsheng is executive chairman of Shell Companies in China, a subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell Plc, the global energy group.

How can China achieve stable and sustainable economic growth? read more

BP, Shell Put Oil Ahead of Earth, ESG Group Warns Investors

Oil giants focus excessively on fossil fuel production, a green advocacy group concluded, and urged investors to demand clear plans for controlling climate change.

Joe McGrath: October 25, 2017

Performance targets of energy companies Royal Dutch Shell and BP remain too heavily biased towards hydrocarbon production, a report has warned.

ShareAction — a U.K. charity that promotes environment, social, and governance-oriented investing — looked at BP and Shell’s greenhouse emissions management policies, asset portfolio resilience, corporate key performance indicators, executive incentive structures, and influences on public policy. The group concluded that the oil giants prioritize the production of fossil fuels, which could incentivize management behavior “misaligned” with shareholder interest, as defined by ShareAction. read more

Big Oil Is Investing Billions to Gain a Foothold in Clean Energy

The world’s biggest oil companies are closing more clean energy deals as pressure to diversify their businesses mounts and growth accelerates among green technologies.

Oil majors more than doubled the number of acquisitions, project investments and venture capital stakes, to 44 in 2016 from 21 the year before, according to research published Tuesday by Bloomberg New Energy Finance. In the last 15 years, they’ve completed 428 transactions and spent $6.2 billion building stakes in clean energy companies. read more

You Can Now Charge Electric Cars at Shell in the U.K.

Royal Dutch Shell Plc opened its first rapid charging point for electric cars at gasoline stations in the U.K., the latest sign that oil majors are waking up to the disruption plug-in vehicles could have on their industry.

The new Shell Recharge service is available at three sites in London, Surrey and Derby. It will expand to seven other locations in London and Reading by the end of the year, according to an emailed statement.

Britain has more than 8,000 retail stations, and those are closing at a rate of about 100 per year and and may number 6,000 by 2035 as electric cars spread, according to analysis by the oil-industry researcher Wood Mackenzie. In a race to lead the world in battery powered cars, the U.K. has also said it may require motorway service areas and large gasoline stations to install electric vehicle recharging points. It’s also said it will ban the sale of new vehicles that take diesel fuel by 2040. read more

Shell switches on to ‘rapid recharge’ for electric vehicles

Written by

Shell has announced the opening of Shell Recharge – the new on-forecourt Electric Vehicle (EV) rapid charging service.

Shell Recharge is now available at Shell Holloway (London), Shell Whyteleafe (Surrey) and Shell Derby, and will be launched at a further seven locations within Greater London and Reading by the end of the year.

Jane Lindsay-Green, Shell UK Future Fuels Manager, said: “Shell Recharge provides Electric Vehicle drivers with a convenient way to charge their cars on-the-go. read more

Shell has seen the future – and it’s several shades of green

Ben Van Beurden, chief executive officer of Royal Dutch Shell, sees a future dominated by gas and renewables, with gas the clear winner. Photo: Bloomberg

By Ben Marlow: 

If there is one subject that divides energy producers it’s the question of when oil demand will peak.

Indeed, it is such a controversial topic that some senior figures like Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister, Khalid al-Falih, prefer not to discuss it at all.

He claims talk of peak demand is dangerous. It threatens to reduce vital investment, “compromising” energy security, al-Falih said earlier this year.

John Watson, boss of American oil giant Chevron, recently dismissed the idea of peak demand as “wishful thinking”. read more

Shell buys NewMotion charging network in first electric vehicle deal

Karolin Schaps: OCTOBER 12, 2017 / 1:23 PM

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) has agreed to buy Dutch-based NewMotion, the owner of one of Europe’s largest electric vehicle charging networks, marking the company’s first deal in electric mobility as demand for cleaner vehicles is expected to soar.

Shell said NewMotion, which manages over 30,000 charging points for electric vehicles in Western Europe and offers access to thousands more, will operate in parallel to Shell’s program of rolling out fast charging points at its forecourts. read more

Citizens must “flood the courts” in fight for climate justice: economist

Deep-pocketed oil companies – from Exxon Mobil to Chevron and Royal Dutch Shell – should bear the bulk of the legal blame and responsibility, but legal tools could also be used to seek remedy from governments.. In September, cities including San Francisco and Oakland filed separate lawsuits against five oil companies using the “public nuisance” doctrine, seeking billions of dollars to protect against rising sea levels.

Adela Suliman: OCTOBER 4, 2017

LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – The world faces a ticking time bomb in the form of global warming, and recent disasters caused by extreme weather should motivate individuals to urgently seek “climate justice”, said leading U.S. economist Jeffrey Sachs.

The U.N. special adviser urged citizens to “flood the courts” with legal cases demanding the right to a safe and clean environment, and to pursue major polluters such as big oil companies and negligent governments for liability and damages. read more

Interview – Shell Netherlands CEO: More large wind projects wanted

Toby SterlingStefano Berra: OCTOBER 5, 2017

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – As the Netherlands struggles to meet its renewable energy goals, Shell’s country chief executive sees its role as the architect of big, high-risk projects such as wind turbine farms — for the time being.

In an interview, Marjan van Loon said Shell had joined a coalition of companies urging the Dutch government to greatly increase its ambitions for offshore wind farms from its current plan for 5 tenders of 700 megawatt farms. read more

Energy Industry ‘Very, Very Close’ to Voluntary Methane Emissions Reduction Program, Says Shell Exec

Jeremiah Shelor: October 4, 2017

The American Petroleum Institute is getting “very, very close” to formally adopting a voluntary program to curb methane emissions from the oil and gas industry, Royal Dutch Shell plc’s Greg Guidry, executive vice president of unconventionals, said this week.

Speaking at the North American Gas Forum in Washington, DC, on Monday Guidry said the “very comprehensive program” would go into effect in January. “It’s focused on the three primary sources of fugitive emissions based on all of the studies through” the Environmental Defense Fund, the University of Texas at Austin and others. read more

Shunning fossil fuels, 40 Catholic groups seek climate action

Environment Correspondent Alister Doyle: OCTOBER 3, 2017

OSLO (Reuters) – Forty Roman Catholic groups said on Tuesday they were shunning investments in fossil fuels and urged others to follow suit.

The coalition was the largest number of Catholic institutions, in countries including Australia, South Africa, Britain and the United States, to team up for a shift to greener energies, the Global Catholic Climate Movement said.

Among those taking part was Assisi’s Sacro Convento and other Catholic institutions in the Italian town, birthplace of Saint Francis, who inspired Pope Francis. read more

Shell to Seek Sale of Stake in $1.4 Billion Wind Farm

Royal Dutch Shell Plc and its partners Eneco Holdings NV and Mitsubishi Corp. are seeking to sell a stake in two Dutch offshore wind-farm projects that may cost $1.4 billion to develop, two people familiar with the plan said.

The companies are looking to reduce their ownership in the Borssele III and IV wind farms by as much as 45 percent, according to the people who asked not to be named because they aren’t authorized to speak about it publicly. The fourth partner, infrastructure contractor Van Oord NV, is keeping its share of the project. read more

Statoil, Shell and Total to store CO2 offshore Norway

Representatives from Shell, Statoil and Total have teamed up to steer a project that will store carbon dioxide captured from industrial operations in Norway offshore. Photo courtesy of Ole Jørgen Bratland/Statoil

Oct. 2 (UPI) — Norwegian energy company Statoil said Monday it was leading a partnership aimed at advancing Paris climate efforts through carbon capture and storage.

Statoil said it would lead a project alongside the Norwegian subsidiaries of Royal Dutch Shell and French supermajor Total in storing carbon dioxide captured from industrial facilities in eastern Norway at an offshore site. read more

Shell plans $1B/year toward electric vehicle charging, energy management

|By: , SA News Editor

  • Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) is working on developing new energy technologies such as smart electric vehicle charging and models to reduce customers’ energy use, says Mark Gainsborough, head of the company’s New Energies division.
  • Goldman Sachs has predicted that oil demand could peak as early as 2024 due to the rollout of electric vehicles and rising fuel prices, and Shell says it plans to invest up to $1B/year through the New Energies division by the end of the decade as it seeks to ramp up involvement in technologies that are changing the market.
  • Gainsborough says Shell already has started to provide fast-charging for electric vehicles at its gasoline stations and is working on developing “smart charging” to help even out demand on the electricity grid.
  • read more

    Shell Electric Car Chargers

    Shell, one of the largest oil and gas companies in the world, is going electric. Photos uploaded this week show how the company’s new electric car chargers look in reality — and it looks like something out of a sci-fi film. 

    The Shell Recharge stations, as they are branded, are 50 kWh direct current chargers that can recharge a car’s battery to around 80 percent in 30 minutes. The stations will initially be available at 10 service stations this year in the United Kingdom, around the London, Reading and Derby areas. They support Chademo, CCS and AC Type 2 charging connectors, and the company plans to provide Tesla adaptors in the future. read more

    Shell explores electric vehicle charging, energy management businesses

    SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 / 8:20 AM

    AMSTERDAM, Sept 28 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell is working on developing new energy technologies like ‘smart’ electric vehicle charging and models to reduce customers’ energy use, the head of the oil company’s new energies division is set to say on Thursday.

    Shell intends to invest up to $1 billion a year through its New Energies division by the end of the decade as the oil company adjusts to an energy market that is moving towards more electrification, decentralised energy use and cleaner fuels. read more

    Dyson to make electric cars from 2020

    Dyson, the engineering company best known for its vacuum cleaners and fans, plans to spend £2bn developing a “radical” electric car.

    The battery-powered vehicle is due to be launched in 2020.

    Dyson says 400 staff have been working on the secret project for the past two years at its headquarters in Malmesbury, Wiltshire.

    However, the car does not yet exist, with no prototype built, and a factory site is yet to be chosen. read more

    It’s Not Just The CEO’s Car: Shell Converts Corporate Fleet To Plug-In Hybrids

    ,

    Shell CEO Ben van Beurden made headlines worldwide when he told an interviewer in July that his next car would be an electric vehicle, but he stopped short of a full disclosure: van Beurden’s new car is part of a company-wide conversion of the corporate fleet.

    Shell Technology Director Harry Brekelmans clarified this month that he too is getting a plug-in vehicle, though it’s a hybrid:

    “Indeed Ben’s next car is electrical, but what he also says time and again is that fossil fuels will remain a part of the energy mix for decades to come, so his next car’s a hybrid, not a full EV,” Brekelmans said in appearance at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “And I know because my next car also will be a hybrid, because we’re changing the corporate fleet.” read more

    Shell plans UK’s first ‘no-petrol’ station as journey towards clean motoring continues

    Jillian Ambrose: 

    Royal Dutch Shell is preparing to open Britain’s first “no-petrol” service station in the capital next year as part of its drive towards cleaner motoring.

    The forecourt is expected to offer motorists biofuels, electric vehicle charge points and hydrogen cell refuelling instead of traditional petrol and diesel pumps. Meanwhile, the buildings are due to be powered by ­renewable energy from solar panels on the forecourt roof.

    Sources close to the Anglo-Dutch oil giant told The Telegraph that a central London site had been chosen, but the project was still at a very early stage. A spokesman for Shell declined to comment. read more

    Economic storm on the horizon

    The rise of battery-powered cars threatens disaster for Houston’s oil and gas economy.

    Halfway around the globe, a storm is brewing that will pose a greater threat to our oil and gas industry than Hurricanes Harvey or Ike, or even a massive storm surge right up Houston Ship Channel.

    The danger: China wants to stop buying gasoline. Specifically, at an automotive conference in Tianjin, the nation’s vice minister of industry and information technology stated that the government is planning on a total phaseout of vehicles powered by fossil fuels. This announcement follows similar plans from Britain and France to ban sales of diesel and gasoline cars by 2040. That’s decades away, but the world is undeniably moving towards a future where the internal combustion engine is a thing of the past. read more

    California cities sue big oil firms over climate change

    Gary McWilliams: SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 / 2:34 AM

    (Reuters) – California cities San Francisco and Oakland filed separate lawsuits against five oil companies on Wednesday seeking billions of dollars to protect against rising sea levels they blamed on climate change, according to public documents.

    The lawsuits, filed in state courts in San Francisco and Alameda Counties, alleged Chevron Corp, ConocoPhillips, Exxon Mobil Corp, BP Plc, and Royal Dutch Shell Plc, created a public nuisance and asked for funds to finance infrastructure to deal with rising sea levels. read more

    San Francisco sues Big Oil for billions over climate change claiming they knew the dangers for decades

    ‘Instead of owning up to it, they copied a page from the Big Tobacco playbook,’ says San Francisco’s city attorney

    The Golden Gate Bridge across San Francisco Bay

    The US cities of San Francisco and Oakland are suing five of the world’s largest oil companies for the coasts of walls and other defences against rising sea levels, saying the industry made vast profits from fossil fuels while knowing they were causing “an existential threat to humankind”.

    Drawing a direct comparison to the tobacco industry’s sale of cigarettes despite knowledge of the health risks, the city attorneys announced they had filed separate lawsuits against BP, Royal Dutch Shell, Exxon Mobil, Chevron and ConocoPhillips. read more

    SF, Oakland sue top five oil and gas companies over climate change

    San Francisco and Oakland on Wednesday announced lawsuits against five major oil and gas companies. (Courtesy photo)

    The lawsuits against Chevron, ConocoPhillips, Exxon Mobil, BP and Royal Dutch Shell claim the companies have known for decades that global warming and sea level rise were accelerated by the investor-owned producers of fossil fuels, but the companies still continued to “aggressively produce, market and sell vast quantities of fossil fuels for a global market”

    By on September 20, 2017 10:59 am

    The cities of San Francisco and Oakland have filed separate lawsuits against five major oil and gas companies for allegedly contributing to the costs of climate change and sea level rise by producing massive amounts of fossil fuels, city leaders announced Wednesday.

    The lawsuits against Chevron, ConocoPhillips, Exxon Mobil, BP and Royal Dutch Shell claim the companies have known for decades that global warming and sea level rise were accelerated by the investor-owned producers of fossil fuels, but the companies still continued to “aggressively produce, market and sell vast quantities of fossil fuels for a global market,” according to a news release from the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office. read more

    Shell pleased with the YouTube/Facebook duopoly

    Shell was never going to burn bridges to either platform, not when both are key to reaching the millennials who think the oil industry is only about profiting from irreversible damage to the planet.

    Seb Joseph: SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

    Not every advertiser sees YouTube’s brand-safety woes and Facebook’s metric mishaps as chances to openly berate the duopoly. Oil giant Shell is doing the opposite, taking a pragmatic — and sometimes sympathetic — view of both companies’ quandaries.

    Between developing a clear strategy for YouTube and running more ads on Facebook, Shell has pinned its colors to the duopoly flag for the foreseeable future. Americo Campos Silva, head of digital and social media for Shell, justified the moves, insisting that Google isn’t entirely to blame for ads appearing next to terrorist videos and criticizing the videos’ creators for avoiding detection using specific tags. Campos Silva also downplayed reports that Facebook falsified the size of its audience… read more

    Oil Majors Cut Greenhouse Gas Pollution

    By Foster Wong: 18 September 2017

    Big Oil had started fighting climate change before President Donald Trump took office read more

    Shell Sees Opportunity in Clean Hydrogen Production

    A large hydrogen plant could be a step toward a clean energy future.

    Travis Hoium (TMFFlushDraw) Sep 13, 2017 at 7:06AM The dream for those of us following renewable energy is to someday be able to produce 100% of the world’s energy from renewable sources. Wind and solar power could easily provide enough energy to replace every power plant and barrel of oil in the world, if only there were a cheap, easy way to store it. Batteries are expensive and chemically intensive, so hydrogen was always seen as a top-option for long-term energy storage.

    Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS-A) (NYSE:RDS-B) and ITM Power (NASDAQOTH: ITMPF) may have taken a small step toward building a hydrogen-fueled renewable future earlier this month by announcing a 10-megawatt  electrolyzer complex in Germany that will supply hydrogen to its refining plant. The hydrogen could also be used to help balance the grid or be sold to customers for their own uses.

    A big deal for hydrogen

    Hydrogen has incredible potential to disrupt the energy industry, but it has been rendered all but obsolete in most of the auto industry, pushed aside in favor of rapidly improving batteries. There’s no point in building a hydrogen vehicleor the necessary infrastructure if batteries can charge quickly and are cost-effective. read more

    Lawsuit: Shell Knew Climate Risks in Providence and Ignored Them

    A lawsuit alleges Shell Oil is failing to protect the Providence, R.I., waterfront from climate impacts. Photo credit: Jef Nickerson via Flickr

    By Karen Savage: September 12, 2017

    The oil giant Shell has known for decades about the dangers of not protecting its facilities—and in turn its neighbors and the environment—from the growing risks associated with climate change, alleges a lawsuit filed by the Conservative Law Foundation, a Boston-based environmental law and advocacy group that operates across New England. read more

    General Motors, Disney, Shell and 1,200 other companies are taking steps to fight climate change, report says

    September 12 at 12:01 AM

    More than 1,200 global businesses, including U.S. companies such as Disney, Shell and General Motors, are moving to embrace a carbon price — even if President Trump isn’t, according to a new report by a Washington climate think tank.

    While the president has suggested that tackling climate change will undermine the economy and hamstring  businesses, chief executives have been busy voluntarily putting a price on their own carbon dioxide emissions. read more

    Shell Retail Looks to the Future With Car Charging, Clean Fuels

    A Mirai hydrogen fuel powered automobile, manufactured by Toyota Motor Corp., sits on the forecourt at Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s first U.K. hydrogen refueling station in Cobham, U.K., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Shell, crafting a strategy to wean itself off oil, is expanding its operations in the refueling market for hydrogen cars. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg Rakteem Katakey, Javier Blas: BloombergSeptember 11, 2017

    Royal Dutch Shell Plc wants 20 percent of income from its retail forecourts to come from vehicles that don’t burn diesel or gasoline, as the company anticipates an accelerating transition to clean energy over the coming decade. 

    Shell set up its first hydrogen refueling station in the U.K. earlier this year and will install its first electric car charging point later this month, said John Abbott, the top executive of its downstream business, which includes refining, marketing, retail, trading and chemicals. By 2025, he expects these new operations supplying cleaner fuels, including natural gas, to make up a fifth of retail earnings. read more

    Shell’s long view

    By Ed Crooks: Sunday September 10, 2017

    Royal Dutch Shell this week set out its views on the outlook over the next few decades, in presentations to investors in New York and London. Shell has been thinking deeply for decades about how to model the future. The scenarios it sets out are more explicit about the uncertainties involved than other projections, which sometimes seem to imply that we can be confident oil consumption in 2040 will be 110.8m barrels per day, or with other overly precise figures. read more

    Global shockwaves from electric cars will be here sooner rather than later

    Shift in power. Illustration: David Simonds/Observer

    Governments, the oil industry and car makers are waking up to the profound changes battery-powered cars will bring

    Sunday 10 September 2017

    Last week, Shell argued that the fuel savings from the efficiency improvements in internal combustion engines would outweigh those from electric vehicles threefold. The Anglo-Dutch company believes oil demand will not peak until the mid-2030s, despite expecting electric and plug-in hybrids cars to make up 35% of new car sales by then, up from 1% now. “To come radically earlier than the early 2030s [peak oil demand], there has to somehow be a demand change, and it’s not going to come from electric cars,” said Guy Outen, Shell’s executive vice-president of strategy and portfolio. But the company’s actions may tell a different story… FULL ARTICLE read more

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