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Posts under ‘BP’

Shell’s Trading Arm Bags Stake In London-Based Blockchain Start-Up

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Oil giant Royal Dutch Shell’s trading arm Shell Trading International made a significant move into blockchain development on Thursday (18 January) by bagging a minority stake in London, U.K.-based start-up Applied Blockchain.

In the simplest of terms, a blockchain is akin to a digitally distributed ledger that can be replicated and spread across many nodes in a peer-to-peer network, thereby minimising the need for oversight and governance of a single ledger. read more

CAN BIG OIL BE SUED FOR CAUSING GLOBAL WARMING?

BY

New York City and a number of California municipalities, including San Francisco and Oakland, have filed lawsuits against five major oil companies—BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, Exxon Mobil, and Royal Dutch Shell—for contributing to the increased risk of global warming.

These complaints cite recent scientific reports that project that sea levels will rise from 0.2 meters to 2.0 meters (or 0.66 to 6.6 feet) by 2100, with a major loss of land surface area and serious climate disruptions. read more

Shell and BP to Buy Libyan Oil as Country Recovers

Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc agreed annual deals to buy Libyan crude, underscoring how the North African country’s recovering production and improving security are enticing some of the world’s largest oil companies.

Shell’s deal with Libya’s National Oil Corp. was the first of its kind since 2013 and Europe’s biggest oil company will load its first cargo under the contract within days, according to people familiar with the matter, who asked not to be identified because they’re not authorized to talk to the media. BP, which didn’t have a term deal in 2017, also reached an agreement for this year, the people said. read more

Royal Dutch Shell one of the companies with biggest pensions deficit

After Carillion how many firms can the pensions lifeboat rescue? 

The Pension Protection Fund can absorb the firm’s liabilities but the spotlight is now on others with big pension deficits

The companies with the biggest deficits, according to a report last year from pension consultants LCP, are Royal Dutch Shell, BP, BT and BAE Systems. The four FTSE 100 companies each had a deficit of more than £6bn in 2016.

The pensions lifeboat that comes to the rescue when firms go bust is about to get a lot more crowded following the collapse of Carillion.

The sprawling construction and outsourcing firm had a pension deficit of £580m but is now likely to rise to at least £800m because it no longer has a solvent business standing alongside it. The company’s crash into liquidation has thrown the spotlight on other firms with huge pension scheme deficits such as IAG, BTand BAE.

It has also raised questions about how many more big company failures the Pension Protection Fund (PPF) can absorb, and why companies with big deficits are allowed to pump out bumper dividend payouts to shareholders. read more

New York City sues Shell, ExxonMobil, and other oil majors over climate change

Each of the first six months of 2016 set a record as the warmest respective month globally. Credit: NASA/GISS
January 10 2018

The New York City government is suing the world’s five largest publicly traded oil companies, seeking to hold them responsible for present and future damages to the city from climate change.

The suit, filed Tuesday against BP, Chevron, Conoco-Phillips, ExxonMobil and Royal Dutch Shell, claims the companies together produced 11 percent of all of global warming gases through the oil and gas products they have sold over the years. It also charges that the companies and the industry of which they are part have known for some time about the consequences but sought to obscure them. read more

New York City sues 5 major oil companies, claiming they contributed to global warming

The ExxonMobil refinery seen at dusk in St. Bernard Parish, La.

(Gerald Herbert / AP)

Associated Press

New York City is suing five major oil companies, claiming they have contributed to global warming.

Mayor Bill de Blasio says the city will be seeking billions in the lawsuit to recoup money spent by the city for resiliency efforts related to climate change.

The defendants in the city’s federal lawsuit are BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, Exxon Mobil and Royal Dutch Shell.

A BP spokesman declined comment. A Shell spokesman said climate change is a complex issue that should not be addressed by the courts. The other three did not immediately comment. read more

Big Oil Finds Hurdles Buried in Trump’s ‘America-First’ Tax Plan

For Big Oil, the U.S. tax overhaul is turning out to be a mixed bag, especially for companies that drill overseas.

Two weeks after President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans passed a sweeping rewrite of the tax code that cuts corporate rates, drillers are finding other changes that are less of a boon. BP Plc and Royal Dutch Shell Plc offered a preview recently, saying they may write off as much as $4 billion in tax assets as a result.

Caps on debt-interest payments and cuts to deductions from previous years’ losses may hurt companies building capital-intensive projects with borrowed money. And other provisions, including time limits on expensing exploration, could hem in drillers with long-term projects, including Exxon Mobil Corp. and Chevron Corp. That may also give an edge to domestic shale production. read more

U.S. offers drillers nearly all offshore waters, but focus is on eastern Gulf

Ernest Sheyder and Valerie Volcovici

HOUSTON/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump’s administration has proposed opening up nearly all of America’s offshore waters to oil and gas drilling, but the industry says it is mainly interested in one part of it, now cordoned off by the Pentagon: the eastern Gulf of Mexico.

The industry’s focus on an area located near a sprawling network of existing platforms, pipes and ports could ease the path to new reserves, and assuage the drilling opponents near other places offered under the Interior Department’s proposed drilling plan issued last week, like California’s Pacific, the Atlantic and Arctic. read more

Zenith Energy Acquires Hamburg Terminaling Assets from Shell

HOUSTON, Jan. 8, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Zenith Energy, L.P. (“Zenith”), an international liquids and bulk terminaling company, today announced that it has signed an agreement to acquire a liquids storage terminal facility in Hamburg, Germany from Royal Dutch Shell plc (“Shell”).  The transaction is expected to close in the first half of 2018.  Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

The terminal assets are located in the Port of Hamburg, Germany’s largest seaport and the third largest container port in Europe.  The facility, located on 55 hectares, serves as a refined product import and blending terminal in North Germany with an expected storage capacity of over 480 thousand cubic meters / 3.0 million barrels for gasoline, diesel and jet fuel; inbound and outbound ocean vessel, barge, rail and truck; and pipeline connectivity in the Port of Hamburg.  After transferring ownership to Zenith, Shell will remain a significant customer of the terminal. read more

BP takes $1.5 billion charge over U.S tax changes, joining Shell

RON BOUSSO: JANUARY 2, 2018 / 7:34 AM LONDON (Reuters) – BP (BP.L) will take a one-off $1.5 billion charge in its 2017 fourth quarter earnings as a result of new U.S. corporate income tax rules, joining rival Royal Dutch Shell.

The British oil and gas company said on Tuesday the cut in U.S. corporate income tax from 35 percent to 21 percent was expected to positively impact its U.S. earnings in the long run.

But in the short term, lower tax rates would affect its deferred tax assets and liabilities, resulting in a one-off, non-cash charge of $1.5 billion to its fourth quarter results which are due to be announced on Feb. 8, it said.

“The ultimate impact of the change in the U.S. corporate income tax rate is subject to a number of complex provisions in the legislation which BP is reviewing,” BP said in a statement. read more

Ineos sees Forties oil flows back to normal around new year

Reporting by Dmitry Zhdannikov and Julia Payne; Editing by Elaine Hardcastle and Mark Potter: December 28, 2017

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s biggest and most important oil and gas pipeline Forties should resume normal flows around the new year, slightly earlier than previously flagged, its operator Ineos said on Thursday.

Ineos had previously expected the pipeline, which suffered a rare unplanned shutdown because of a crack, to resume normal operations in early January.

The closure since Dec. 11 of the pipeline, which normally pumps about 450,000 barrels per day, and supply disruptions in Libya have helped push oil prices above $67 a barrel, their highest since mid-2015. [O/R] read more

Insidious Gas Leaks Are Casting Doubts Over Shell’s Clean Credentials

Methane seepage may make natural gas more polluting than coal

Gas focus, expansion of shale reinforce need for reliable data

After spending $50 billion on the world’s biggest bet on natural gas, Royal Dutch Shell Plc is at the forefront of Big Oil’s efforts to clean up its act. But what if the constant, insidious leaks of gas into the atmosphere actually make the fuel more polluting than coal? 

Methane, the main component in natural gas, can seep into the air at various points between extraction and delivery. Trapping more heat than carbon dioxide, it’s a potent contributor to global warming. Yet credible data on the volumes released is scarce, and that’s spurring pressure from investors.

“This is such an important issue,” said Tim Goodman, a director at asset manager Hermes EOS who has urged oil companies to address climate matters in their quarterly updates. “The less methane is lost to the environment, the less dirty methane and natural gas is, and the longer gas might be a viable fuel.” read more

Production Halted At 2 North Sea Platforms After Main Pipeline Shutdown

Fun Trading: 18 Dec 2017

Summary

  • Shell announced that production from the Shearwater and Nelson platforms in the central North Sea had been suspended due to Forties pipeline shutdown.
  • Forties pipeline is a vital artery of the North Sea production. Production loss is estimated at about 400K Boep/d which is significant and may boost oil prices for weeks.
  • This situation could be considered as a net positive for Shell and other oil majors.

Investment Thesis:

Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A) (RDS.B), BP P.l.c (BP), and Exxon Mobil (XOM) are the most reliable long-term oil companies and should be part of your main oil portfolio. However, this special status comes with the shareholders’ obligation to follow tightly what is going on with the company on the day-to-day news which may eventually change the future outlook — in this case with a potential production cut. This is exactly what I intend to discuss today. read more

Oil stable on tighter market, but rising US output looms for 2018

BY HENNING GLOYSTEIN: DECEMBER 15, 2017

* OPEC-led supply cuts, Forties pipeline outage support crude

* But rising U.S. output, driven by shale, weighs on market

SINGAPORE, Dec 15 (Reuters) – Oil markets were stable on Friday as the Forties pipeline outage in the North Sea and the ongoing OPEC-led production cuts supported prices, while rising output from the United States kept crude from rising further.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $57.13 a barrel at 0119 GMT, up 9 cents from their last settlement. read more

Goldman Says Big Oil Is Poised for Its Best Year in Decades

Big Oil’s slump is over and industry domination beckons, according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc.

In 2018, companies from Royal Dutch Shell Plc to Exxon Mobil Corp. will find themselves with a surplus of cash to fund dividends, ruling the world of deep water mega-projects and even coming out ahead in tax negotiations with oil-reliant governments around the globe, according to Michele Della Vigna, Goldman’s head of energy-industry research.

The industry’s success in cutting costs, paired with a low oil price that keeps smaller competitors out of the biggest projects, has created an environment where only major players can compete, Vigna said. That should bolster earnings and return the industry giants to a position of dominance not seen in 20 years. read more

Norway parties inclined to back fund’s plan to slash oil exposure -report

REUTERS STAFF: DECEMBER 12, 2017

OSLO, Dec 12 (Reuters) – Norway’s $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund, the world’s largest, will probably win backing from parliament for its proposal to cut most oil and gas stocks from its portfolio, business daily Dagens Naeringsliv reported on Tuesday.

If adopted by parliament, the fund would over time divest billions of dollars from oil and gas stocks, which now represent 6 percent – or around $37 billion – of its benchmark equity index. read more

Corbyn backs call for MPs’ pension fund to divest fossil fuels

John McDonnell and Jeremy Corbyn support Divest Parliament, a group trying to force the parliamentary pension fund to drop fossil fuel investments © AFP

, Chief Political Correspondent

The Labour leader and shadow chancellor have swung their support behind Divest Parliament, a group trying to force the Parliamentary Contributory Pension Fund to drop investments in fossil fuels, including a £5.6m stake in BP and £5m of shares in Royal Dutch Shell. FULL FT ARTICLE read more

Integrated Gas To Drive Royal Dutch Shell’s Value Going Forward

Great Speculations: Trefis Team: DEC 7, 2017 @ 04:22 PM

With the growing inclination towards the use of cleaner and environment-friendly sources of energy, natural gas has emerged as a preferred choice of fuel worldwide. However, due to the challenges related to the transportation and storage of gas, the demand for liquefied natural gas (LNG) has grown faster than the demand for natural gas over the last decade. As a result, natural gas producers, particularly in the U.S., have been expanding their LNG operations to capitalize on the booming demand for the commodity. Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.A) is one such integrated energy company that has been increasing its presence in the gas markets. In this note, we discuss how Shell’s integrated gas business will drive value for the company over in the long term. read more

U.S. oil majors fall behind on climate, European lead

Major European oil companies are making major efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to fight climate change. American majors are dragging their behinds.

Royal Dutch Shell pledged Tuesday to slash carbon emission by 50 percent and boost investment in clean, renewable energy. CEO Ben van Beurden promised to spend at least $2 billion on on wind power, biofuels and electric cars, about the same amount it will spend on shale oil.

“It is making sure that the products within society have an overall lower carbon footprint,” Beurden told investors, according to the Guardian newspaper. “That is the long-term way of making sure our business remains a relevant business in the face of the energy transition.” read more

Shell Midstream buying pipelines, terminals for $825m

Houston’s Shell Midstream Partners is going on a buying spree, acquiring $825 million worth of pipelines and terminals from its Royal Dutch Shell parent.

Written by

The deals designed to beef up the three-year-old Shell Midstream business give the Houston pipelines firm more ownership in Gulf Coast and Gulf of Mexico pipelines, as well as a slew of terminals from the Houston area to Washington state.

The drop-down acquisitions from the parent Shell and other Shell subsidiaries give Shell Midstream majority ownership of the Mars and Odyssey oil pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico. Shell Midstream already owned 49 percent stakes in the pipelines and the deal ups those stakes to at least 71 percent. read more

Royal Dutch Shell’s Deepwater Strength

Dividend Stream: Nov. 30, 2017

Summary

  • Royal Dutch Shell held its annual analyst day earlier this week.
  • Management expects to generate at least $25 billion in excess cash flow by 2019.
  • Despite rising share prices, Shell can still be picked up here.
  • This idea was discussed in more depth with members of my private investing community, Streaming Income.

The recovery in oil and gas is in full swing. While benchmark crude oil prices have gone up across the board, Brent is now $63 per barrel, the catalyst for this recovery comes more in the fact that oil producers have done such a good job in bringing costs down.

Nowhere is that more starkly noticeable than in offshore, deepwater drilling, where dayrates for state-of-the-art rigs have gone from as high as $700,000 three years ago to just $250,000 or so. As onshore rig counts creep higher, cost inflation is once again becoming a fact of life in select onshore shale plays. With deepwater drilling, however, there are still many rigs ‘stacked’ in harbors across the world just waiting to come out and get activated, thereby keeping development and operational costs down. read more

Shell signals return to pure cash dividend, focus on renewables

FILE PHOTO: Ben van Beurden, chief executive officer of Royal Dutch Shell, speaks during a news conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, February 15, 2016. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes /File Photo

Ron Bousso: NOVEMBER 18, 2017

LONDON (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) will return to paying pure cash dividends and step up its investment in cleaner energy as it turns a corner after more than two years of cost cuts and disposals prompted by weak oil prices.

Shell Chief Executive Officer Ben van Beurden sought to strike a balance between reassuring investors it can increase returns in its core fossil fuel business during an “era of volatility” in oil prices while preparing to step up investments in renewables. read more

Exxon, Shell, BP to Join Group to Cut Emissions From Natural Gas

By Sarah Kent

Exxon Mobil Corp. plans to join with other big energy companies in an effort to reduce pollution from natural gas production, according to people familiar with the matter. 

The new grouping will also include Royal Dutch Shell PLC and BP PLC, according to the people. While Shell and BP have joined forces with other global players in the past in similar industrywide collaborations on environmental issues, Exxon has more typically stayed on the sidelines. read more

Tory ministers lobbied Brazil on behalf of Shell and BP, Government accidentally reveals

Greg Hands used a meeting with a Brazilian minister to pass on oil companies’ concerns: Rex Features

Brazilian government later gave major drilling licenses to the two companies

Liam Fox’s Department for International Trade successfully lobbied the Brazilian government over environmental regulations on behalf of three major oil companies, an official document has revealed.

Greg Hands, the international trade minister, reportedly made representations on behalf of BP, Shell and Premier Oil during a trip to Brazil in March.

He asked the Brazilian government to help British companies secure deals to drill in the pre-salt region of Brazilian waters, according to a British diplomatic cable obtained by Greenpeace. read more

UK trade minister lobbied Brazil on behalf of oil giants

A telegram obtained by Greenpeace shows that Greg Hands met a Brazilian minister to discuss relaxation of tax and environmental regulation. Greenpeace accused the department of acting as a “lobbying arm of the fossil fuel industry”. read more

Analysis: Oil giants unlikely to share coal’s fate, for now

Ron Bousso, Simon Jessop, Susanna Twidale: NOVEMBER 17, 2017

The move by the $1 trillion fund, the world’s largest, rattled stock markets, exposing what is seen as one of the biggest threats to companies such as Royal Dutch Shell, Exxon Mobil and BP as the world shifts towards renewable energy such as wind and solar.

But in the meantime, expectations of growing global demand for oil and gas for decades to come mean reliance on these companies is likely to continue.

And although the Norwegian initiative will encourage those seeking to hasten the move to a low-carbon economy, the degree to which other investors can follow the fund’s example, at least in the short term, is less clear.

The European oil and gas index fell on Friday to its lowest since late September, extending declines following the Norwegian fund’s announcement. read more

Norway Idea to Exit Oil Stocks Is ‘Shot Heard Around the World’

Norway’s proposal to sell off $35 billion in oil and natural gas stocks brings sudden and unparalleled heft to a once-grassroots movement to enlist investors in the fight against climate change.

The Nordic nation’s $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund said Thursday that it’s considering unloading its shares of Exxon Mobil Corp., Royal Dutch Shell Plc and other oil giants to diversify its holdings and guard against drops in crude prices. European oil stocks fell.

Norges Bank Investment Management would not be the first institutional investor to back away from fossil fuels. But until now, most have been state pension funds, universities and other smaller players that have limited their divestments to coal, tar sands or some of the other dirtiest fossil fuels. Norway’s fund is the world’s largest equity investor, controlling about 1.5 percent of global stocks. If it follows through on its proposal, it would be the first to abandon the sector altogether. read more

Big Oil is under pressure, unloved and on sale. 

  • Norway wants to dump its stakes in oil and gas companies
  • Proposal adds to doubts over industry’s long-term outlook

Big Oil is under pressure, unloved and on sale.

Energy giants from Exxon Mobil Corp. to Royal Dutch Shell Plc are struggling back to their feet after a three-year oil slump, while also fighting to prove they can survive for decades to come amid an accelerating shift to clean energy. So getting dumped by the world’s biggest investment fund wouldn’t be welcome news.

Norway’s $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund said on Thursday that it wants to sell about $35 billion of shares in oil and gas companies to make the nation “less vulnerable” to a drop in crude prices. Global energy giants favored by long-term investors including Italy’s Eni SpA, PetroChina Ltd. and Russia’s Gazprom PJSC account for more than $20 billion of that total. read more

World’s Biggest Wealth Fund Wants Out of Oil and Gas

The $1 trillion fund that Norway has amassed pumping oil and gas over the past two decades wants out of petroleum stocks.  

Norway, which relies on oil and gas for about a fifth of economic output, would be less vulnerable to declining crude prices without its fund investing in the industry, the central bank said Thursday. The divestment would mark the second major step in scrubbing the world’s biggest wealth fund of climate risk, after it sold most of its coal stocks.

“Our perspective here is to spread the risks for the state’s wealth,” Egil Matsen, the deputy central bank governor overseeing the fund, said in an interview in Oslo. “We can do that better by not adding oil-price risk.” read more

Norway shakes oil world by dumping investments

Norway is western Europe’s biggest oil producer and its giant sovereign wealth fund wants to reduce its exposure to oil which hit shares in BP and Royal Dutch Shell. Oil platforms in the Cromarty Firth, ScotlandANDREW MILLIGAN/PA

Norway’s giant sovereign wealth fund has unveiled plans to dump its entire holding in oil and gas companies in a $37 billion sell-off that was welcomed by campaign groups but put downward pressure on share prices. The $1 trillion fund, which manages the assets of the oil-rich nation, signalled its intent to prune its exposure to companies including BP and Royal Dutch Shell in a move aimed at making it less vulnerable to a permanent drop in the price of crude. SOURCE read more

Q3 round-up: BP ready to ‘flex’, Shell a good bet to reach divestment target

Written by

Oil majors BP and Shell are closing in on realising key objectives for production and fundraising, an analyst has said.

Speaking after the dust settled on the latest round of quarterly results updates, Iain Armstrong of Brewin Dolphin said Shell should have no problem reaching its divestment target of £23billion for 2016-18.

Shell chief financial officer Jessica Uhl said £15billion worth of asset sales could be chalked up to the divestment programme, which was put in place to help balance the books following the merger with BG Group. read more

As Oil Prices Rise, Global Majors Eyeing Mexico’s Deep Waters

By Adam Williams: 9 November 2017, 21:27 GMT: Updated on 10 November 2017, 05:01 GMT

As the price of oil rises, an international rush is on for Mexico’s untapped deep-water riches.

The who’s who of the oil world — led by Exxon Mobil Corp and Royal Dutch Shell Plc, the world’s two biggest drillers by market value — are lining up to bid in the country’s Jan. 31 deep-water auction. And the interest is international in scope, drawing Chevron Corp. from the U.S., the U.K.’s BP Plc, Norway’s Statoil ASA, France’s Total SA, Australia’s BHP Billiton Ltd, Russia’s Lukoil PJSC and China’s Cnooc Ltd, among others. read more

Peak oil? Majors aren’t buying into the threat from renewables

Ernest Scheyder, Ron Bousso: NOVEMBER 8, 2017 HOUSTON/LONDON (Reuters) – Two decades ago, BP set out to transcend oil, adopting a sunburst logo to convey its plans to pour $8 billion over a decade into renewable technologies, even promising to power its gas stations with the sun.

That transformation – marketed as “Beyond Petroleum” – led to manufacturing solar panels in Australia, Spain and the United States and erecting wind farms in the United States and the Netherlands.

Today, BP (BP.L) might be more aptly branded “Back to Petroleum” after exiting or scaling back its renewable energy investments. Lower-cost Chinese components upended its solar panel business, which the firm shed in 2011. A year later, BP tried to sell its U.S. wind power business but couldn’t get a buyer. read more

Shell expands marine LNG bunkering network with U.S.-based LNG barge

HOUSTON, Nov. 7, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Shell Trading (US) Company announced today it has finalized a long-term charter agreement with Q-LNG Transport, LLC for an LNG bunker barge with the capacity to carry 4,000 cubic meters of LNG fuel.  As the first of its kind to be based in the United States, the ocean-going LNG bunker barge will supply LNG to marine customers along the southern East Coast of the U.S. and support growing cruise line demand for LNG marine fuel.

“This investment in LNG as a marine fuel for the US will provide the shipping industry with a fuel that helps meet tougher emissions regulations from 2020,” said Maarten Wetselaar, Integrated Gas and New Energies Director at Shell. “Our commitment in the Americas builds on Shell’s existing LNG bunkering activities in Singapore and Europe, as well as recently announced plans in the Middle East and gives us the ability to deliver LNG as a marine fuel to customers around the world.” read more

BP joins Shell in helping Mexico execute oil hedge: sources

Dmitry Zhdannikov: NOVEMBER 7, 2017 LONDON (Reuters) – BP (BP.L) helped Mexico execute its 2018 oil hedge, the biggest in the industry, becoming the second major after Shell to participate in the highly coveted program and challenging the traditional role of banks in the operation.

Three industry sources said BP has become a participant of the 2018 program on which Mexico spent some $1.26 billion to hedge its 2018 oil exports against oil price falls as part of government’s efforts to stabilize its budget.

BP declined to comment.

BP joins rival Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L), which made a first foray last year to become the first major to challenge years of dominance of big Wall Street banks in the program.

Shell declined to comment.

Banks such as Goldman Sachs (GS.N), Citi (C.N) and JPMorgan (JPM.N) have dominated Mexico’s program for years but their role has diminished with tighter regulations on bank commodity trading, including a near total ban on proprietary trading. read more

Shell Swallows BG Group Whole Hog, Rolls Up Cash Flow

Ray Merola: Nov. 6, 2017

Summary

  • Shell is enjoying a remarkably successful corporate resurgence.
  • Legacy BG Group opex and capex has been absorbed entirely without a loss of combined hydrocarbon volumes.
  • Cash is king.
  • Debt is trending down.  The dividend is well-covered.  Returns are solid, and improving.
  • I remain constructive on RDS stock.

I’ve been pounding my fist on the table for Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A) (RDS.B) for a couple of years now. It’s been that one, “fat pitch” worth waiting upon; these don’t come along very often. Since the end of 2015, ADR shares offered investors ~54% total return, or an 80% gain since the stock bottomed in January 2016.

The 3Q report included the hallmarks of recent previous quarters: linked-quarter revenue growth, continued strong cash flow, improving return-on-capital, reduced gearing, steady production, and ample dividend coverage. Details are found here. read more

BP, Shell lead plan for blockchain-based energy trading platform

REUTERS STAFF: NOVEMBER 6, 2017

(Reuters) – A consortium including energy companies BP and Royal Dutch Shell will develop a blockchain-based digital platform for energy commodities trading expected to start by end-2018, the group said on Monday.

Other members of the consortium include Norwegian oil firm Statoil, trading houses Gunvor, Koch Supply & Trading, and Mercuria, and banks ABN Amro, ING and Societe Generale.

Blockchain technology, which first emerged as the architecture underpinning cryptocurrency bitcoin, uses a shared database that updates itself in real-time and can process and settle transactions in minutes using computer algorithms, with no need for third-party verification. read more

BP, Shell, Statoil join commodity trading digital venture

Written by

The venture, which also includes commodity traders and banks, will be managed and operated as an independent entity.

The venture partners are BP, Shell and Statoil, trading houses Gunvor, Koch Supply & Trading, and Mercuria, and banks ABN Amro, ING and Societe Generale.

They intend to create a secure, platform to manage physical energy transactions from trade entry to final settlement. read more

Oil rebound drives Shell to booming profits

Jillian Ambrose: 

Royal Dutch Shell became the latest major oil company to deliver better than expected earnings in recent months as the market recovery begins to gain traction.

The Anglo-Dutch oil giant reported $4.1bn (£3bn) in earnings for the last quarter on a current cost of supply basis, its standard measure of profitability. The sum comes in well above analyst forecasts that the group would make $3.6bn for the latest quarter.

Shell’s quarterly earnings are almost 50pc higher than in the same quarter last year, when they reached $2.8bn. read more

Shell beats profit forecasts, targets lower 2017 spending

Ron Bousso

LONDON (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) reported an 18 percent rise in third-quarter profit on Tuesday, lowering next year’s capital spending to the bottom of the expected range as it grapples with persistently low oil prices and weak refining margins.

The Anglo-Dutch oil major, whose acquisition of BG Group transformed it into the world’s top liquefied natural gas producer, has been under pressure from shareholders to cut annual spending to ensure it can maintain its dividend given the slow recovery in the oil prices LCOc1. read more

Shell completes $4.4 billion in sales a day before earnings report

Dutch supermajor trying to dump $30 billion in assets in order to shape the company “into a world class investment.”

By Daniel J. Graeber  |  Nov. 1, 2017 at 6:17 AM

Nov. 1 (UPI) — Royal Dutch Shell said Wednesday it made further progress in a major divestment plan by completing the sale of assets in Gabon and in the North Sea.

For $628 million, Shell said it completed the sale of its entire Gabonese oil and gas interests to a company controlled by The Carlyle Group. The transaction includes the sale of all of Shell’s onshore oil and gas interests, which includes nine total fields, and the associated infrastructure, including pipelines and export terminals. read more

Threat to pensions if BP and Shell find themselves extinct


Stop crude focus on oil profits

The Guardian: Article by Sean Farrell: Sunday 29 October 2017

At the start of last year, Britain’s big oil companies, Shell and BP, appeared to be in crisis. A slump in the price of Brent crude – from more than $110 a barrel in 2014 to less than $30 in January 2016 – sent profits tumbling and appeared to threaten dividends. After painful cost cuts and a partial recovery in the oil price to near $60, the pressure has eased and both are expected to report solid first-half results this week.

BP goes first, on Tuesday, with Shell, the stronger of the two, on Thursday. The commotion over the oil slump diverted some attention from their commitments to low-carbon energy. To much fanfare, both companies’ boards supported resolutions at their 2015 annual meetings that required clearer reporting of emissions, business risks and efforts to develop green energy sources. read more

Shell, BP, Exxon big winners in historic Brazil oil auction

Oct. 27, 2017 5:45 PM ET|About: BP p.l.c. (BP)|By: , SA News Editor

  • Brazil auctioned off six of eight exploration blocks in today’s historic opening of its coveted pre-salt offshore oil region to foreign operators, exceeding the government’s expectations with commitments for 6.15B reais ($1.88B) in signing bonuses.
  • Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) was especially active, winning stakes in half the blocks awarded and bolstering its position as the largest foreign operator in Brazil’s offshore oil sector, second only to state-run Petrobras (NYSE:PBR); Shell believes it can pump oil from the pre-salt fields at below $40/bbl.
  • BP took two blocks, including the Peroba block, which is estimated to contain 5.3B barrels of oil; it won as part of a consortium that included PBR and a Chinese group.
  • Exxon Mobil (NYSE:XOM) grabbed the Norte de Carcará block – which holds an estimated 2.2B barrels of oil, in a consortium with Statoil (NYSE:STO), which says it also sold a stake in a nearby block to XOM for $1.3B.
  • Brazil Pres. Temer says the auction will generate investments of more than 100B reais ($30B) in the country by the winning oil companies.
  • read more

    Profits Jump at Exxon, Chevron, Total

    World’s biggest Western energy companies are on track to post highest annual profits since oil market crashed three years ago

    By Bradley Olson and Sarah Kent

    Big oil is back in the black.

    The world’s biggest Western energy companies are on track to post the highest annual profits since the oil market crashed three years ago and forced them to restructure for a prolonged era of low prices. FULL ARTICLE

    Big Oil’s $1 billion fund backs new cement, engine technologies

    OCTOBER 27, 2017

    LONDON (Reuters) – A $1 billion fund created by top energy companies to curb climate change will back technologies being developed by U.S. cement maker Solidia Technologies and engine maker Achates Power, it said on Friday.

    The Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI) was set up last year and includes Saudi Aramco and Royal Dutch Shell.

    Solidia Technologies will receive funding for making cement with carbon dioxide instead of water, potentially lowering emissions by 70 percent and water use by 80 percent, the OGCI said. read more

    Brazil vs. Mexico: Latin America’s fight for Big Oil’s money

    “Both are attractive. Both have real potential,” said Wael Sawan, Shell’s executive vice president for deepwater. “We have as a company, I think as an industry, scarce capital resources to be able to make the investments that the particular projects in deep water require.”

    OCTOBER 27, 2017

    After two waves of resource nationalism that left few openings in Latin America for energy giants such as Exxon Mobil Corp (XOM.N), Royal Dutch Shell Plc (RDSa.L) and Total (TOTF.PA), the tables are turning.

    Governments throughout the continent are enacting reforms and changing contract terms to lure oil firms that have slashed spending as they adapt to lower crude prices. Global policy changes to address climate change have given an added sense of urgency to governments in the region and worldwide that are sitting on oil and gas reserves. They want to pump it before it becomes less valuable. read more

    BP and Shell planning for catastrophic 5°C global warming despite publicly backing Paris Climate Agreement

    Neither company sets targets to reduce emissions and BP’s total investment in renewable and clean technologies has actually shrunk since 2005, the report said Getty Images

    Companies are trying to ‘have their oil and eat it’ by committing to 2°C in public while planning for much higher temerpature rises, says shareholder campaign group, ShareAction

    Oil giants Shell and BP are planning for global temperatures to rise as much as 5°C by the middle of the century. The level is more than double the upper limit committed to by most countries in the world under the Paris Climate Agreement, which both companies publicly support.

    The discrepancy demonstrates that the companies are keeping shareholders in the dark about the risks posed to their businesses by climate change, according to two new reports published by investment campaign group Share Action. Many climate scientists say that a temperature rise of 5°C would be catastrophic for the planet. read more

    Amid Low Prices, Oil Giants Gush About Breaking Even

    By Sarah Kent Dow Jones Newswires

    The world’s biggest oil companies have a suddenly popular measure for success: breaking even.

    Once obscure and little noted, the break-even number has become an obsession for investors in oil giants such as Exxon Mobil Corp., BP PLC and Chevron Corp. as crude prices stay mired between $50 and $60 a barrel. At its simplest, the metric represents the oil price that a company needs to generate enough cash so it can cover its capital spending and dividend payouts. read more

    BP, Shell Put Oil Ahead of Earth, ESG Group Warns Investors

    Oil giants focus excessively on fossil fuel production, a green advocacy group concluded, and urged investors to demand clear plans for controlling climate change.

    Joe McGrath: October 25, 2017

    Performance targets of energy companies Royal Dutch Shell and BP remain too heavily biased towards hydrocarbon production, a report has warned.

    ShareAction — a U.K. charity that promotes environment, social, and governance-oriented investing — looked at BP and Shell’s greenhouse emissions management policies, asset portfolio resilience, corporate key performance indicators, executive incentive structures, and influences on public policy. The group concluded that the oil giants prioritize the production of fossil fuels, which could incentivize management behavior “misaligned” with shareholder interest, as defined by ShareAction. read more

    Gas producers pumping up demand

    • The Wall Street Journal

    After spending hundreds of billions of dollars to transform themselves into global natural gas giants, some of the world’s biggest energy companies face a new challenge: generating more demand as supplies threaten to balloon and prices languish.

    Companies including Royal Dutch Shell, Total and Cheniere Energy are trying to establish new markets for liquefied natural gas, a super-chilled version of the fuel that can be shipped around the world. Producers are promoting the use of LNG for industrial trucking and shipping. Companies also say they are considering building the power plants and infrastructure necessary to provide gas and electricity in developing markets such as South Africa and Vietnam. read more

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