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Posts under ‘BP’

Would you bet on a rapid rise in the oil price?

By Holly Black for the Daily Mail: PUBLISHED: 21:51, 17 March 2017 

Oil stocks took a knock this week as the price of the black stuff slipped to its lowest level since November.

Despite an agreement to cut production by 1.2m barrels a day by the oil cartel Opec being widely adhered to, supply is still outpacing demand.

Now some experts are concerned the deal could be derailed by a surge in the US, where a 55 per cent year-on-year jump in active rigs has driven production levels to record highs. 

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Shell adds hundreds of jobs in new unit focusing on alternative energy

LeAnne Graves

SINGAPORE // Shell has added hundreds of jobs to its New Energies division as it plans to expand further in alternative fuels, wind and solar, a company executive said.

The oil and gas giant created a new division last year that focuses on investing in hydrogen, biofuels, solar and wind. Mark Gainsborough, Shell’s executive vice president of new energies, said the division’s workforce has expanded to more than 200 staff as the company looks to invest in excess of US$1billion per year by 2020.

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BP Rallies on Possibilities of a Takeover by ExxonMobil

Zacks: March 14, 2017

Shares of BP plc BP rallied after a London-based newspaper claimed that ExxonMobil Corporation XOM is looking to place a takeover bid for the British energy group.

A bid for BP cannot be ignored as these rumors about ExxonMobil’s interest have been doing the rounds for years. However, analysts believe that such a deal is unlikely as it does not seem to be a strategic fit.

The merger would create a company too big and complex to be managed. The weak oil price environment has resulted in just one big deal – Royal Dutch Shell plc’s RDS.A $54 billion purchase of BG Group Plc in 2016. Other key oil players in the industry have embarked on smaller acquisitions as they intend to preserve cash and maintain their balance sheets. Though oil prices have increased from the 12-year lows of last year, companies are still uncertain if the recovery is sustainable.

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BP, Shell Investor Wants CEO Pay Policy Change After Revolt

by Rakteem Katakey:2 March 2017

The pay of bosses at Europe’s biggest oil companies is back in focus as shareholders prepare to scrutinize BP Plc’s new policy after rejecting Chief Executive Officer Bob Dudley’s remuneration last year.

Allianz Global Investors, among the top 25 holders of BP and Royal Dutch Shell Plc shares, wants the companies to base top executives’ pay and bonuses on per-share metrics rather than absolute numbers for cash flow and profit, said Rohan Murphy, an analyst at the investment firm. This will help align the management with shareholders’ interests and ensure profitability becomes more important, he said.

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YPF, Shell sign deal for Vaca Muerta pilot project

Argentina’s state-run oil company YPF SA said it reached a preliminary deal with Royal Dutch Shell Plc on Thursday to develop oil and gas assets in the Vaca Muerta shale field, involving a $300 million investment from Shell.

Both companies will take a 50 percent stake in the Bajada de Añelo field to develop a pilot program, which will be operated by Shell, YPF said in a statement. The agreement is subject to approval by provincial authorities, and Shell’s investment will come in two phases, YPF said.

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Can BP plc and Royal Dutch Shell plc survive the coming oil price crash?

By The Motley Fool  Feb 15, 2017

Last year’s surprise OPEC and non-OPEC oil production cuts were supposed to herald a new area of higher energy prices, but it hasn’t really happened. Oil bulls who predicted oil could hit $60 or $70 a barrel will have been disappointed, with the price stalling around $55. If the price can’t rise now, when will it rise? Or could it even crash?

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Any further slippage would spell bad news for FTSE 100 giants (LSE: BP) and Royal Dutch Shell(LSE: RDSB). They are banking on a higher oil price to keep the cash flowing, and ensure their dividends are sustainable in the longer run.

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OPEC Output Cuts End Big Oil’s Trading Bonanza

The oil-trading boom that cushioned the profits of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc through the price slump of 2015 and early 2016 is over.

BP said on Tuesday it made a “small” loss trading oil in the fourth quarter, while Shell last week said trading profits “flattened” in late 2016. The fall off in trading contributed to worse-than-expected fourth-quarter profits at Europe’s largest oil and gas producers.

Although better known for their oilfields, refineries and gas stations, Shell and BP are the world’s top energy traders, handling about 20 percent of global oil demand between them and dwarfing independent trading houses such as Vitol Group BV, Trafigura Group and Glencore Plc.

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This Is Who Will Pay for Shutting Down North Sea Oil Rigs

Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s $3.8 billion sale of North Sea oil and gas fields creates a model for further transactions in a region where the question of who pays to remove decades-old offshore platforms has been an obstacle for other deals.

Shell’s agreement with Chrysaor Holdings Ltd. included the condition that Europe’s largest oil company covers $1 billion in decommissioning costs, leaving the private-equity-backed explorer with an estimated $2.9 billion of liabilities. Sharing end-of-life costs between buyers and sellers is likely to remain the trend in the North Sea, where the billions of dollars of spending required to remove aging platforms and pipelines over the coming years presents a “real challenge” to deal-making, according to consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd.

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Shell, BP results preview: Look past top line figures to find positive story, analyst says

Written by Mark Lammey – 30/01/2017 7:48 am

Investors monitoring the fourth quarter results of Shell and BP must look beyond the top line figures to get a good reading of the firms’ vital signs.

Iain Armstrong, divisional director at Brewin Dolphin, said the fourth quarter was notoriously hard to predict as oil and gas deliveries tended to be down.

Mr Armstrong said the two majors’ headline figures could be disappointing, unless strong demand from China gives them a boost.

He also said Shell should be in a position to sell more of its North Sea assets, thanks to improved oil prices and the BG Group acquisition showing signs of fruition.

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Shell is expected to report huge annual profit gains as oil prices recover

Recovering oil prices mean Shell will bag a huge profit compared with last year’s (Source: Getty)

Courtney Goldsmith: 29 Jan 2017

Royal Dutch Shell’s annual profits are expected shoot up following last year’s dramatic 80 per cent decline as oil prices continue to inch up.

The oil giant is forecasted to post a profit of $8.17bn (£6.51bn), more than double its profit of $3.8bn the previous year, the Telegraph reported.

The Anglo-Dutch business is also expected to announce the latest development in its drive to ditch $30bn worth of assets following its £35bn takeover of BG Group. Shell is predicted to report the $3bn sale of its North Sea oil and gas assets – almost half of its total assets worth $7bn in the North Sea – to a private-equity-backed explorer.

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Shell bounces back as oil price enjoys a slick resurgence

Shell bounces back as oil price enjoys a slick resurgence

Jillian Ambrose28 JANUARY 2017 • 7:00PM

Royal Dutch Shell is poised to lead a comeback this week as it reveals annual profits have more than doubled on the back of the recovering oil price.

The Anglo-Dutch oil giant is expected to post bumper profits of $8.17bn (£6.91bn), a huge jump on the $3.8bn it reported at the depths of the market downturn.

Alongside the profit boom, Shell is expected to announce the $3bn sale of its North Sea oil and gas assets to a private-equity-backed explorer.

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29 MORE reasons to sell BP plc and Royal Dutch Shell plc

By The Motley Fool  Jan 26, 2017

Those hoping that OPEC’s decision to finally curtail production at November’s Doha summit would go some way to balancing the oil market would no doubt have gasped at the latest US rig count data on Friday.

According to drill checkers Baker Hughes, the number of oil rigs up and running in the States rose by 29 during the seven days to January 20, taking the total to 551.

This was the largest one-week jump since April 2013 and means that the rig count has risen during 10 of the last 11 weeks. Meanwhile, the number of US rigs in operation now stands at a 14-month peak.

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Shell, BP to reveal Q4 income surges, analyst says

Written by Mark Lammey – 19/01/2017 7:22 am

Oil majors Shell and BP are expected to reveal large increases in fourth quarter earnings next month, an analyst said yesterday.

Biraj Borkhataria of RBC Capital Markets estimated BP would record a net income of $1billion in Q4, up from $200million the previous year.

Mr Borkhataria said the firm’s production would edge up during the quarter due to lower seasonal turnaround and maintenance activities, though downstream margins will be under pressure.

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Oil Major Shell Plans To Shrink As Oil Rebounds

By Nick Cunningham – Jan 03, 2017, 3:07 PM CST

Oil prices are rising and the industry is poised for a rebound, with U.S. shale spending set to soar in 2017. But for Royal Dutch Shell, this year will be much more mundane as years of high spending and ballooning deficits force the Anglo-Dutch oil major to retrench.

Even as the New Year promises to bring a sharp improvement in the finances of oil companies across the world, including Shell, not everyone will approach the rebound in the oil market in the same way. Smaller U.S. shale companies, with assets concentrated in some highly profitable areas such as the Permian, are planning to sharply increase spending and drilling. But the oil majors are less nimble, having assets diversified upstream and downstream, spread out across the globe. They were able to weather the oil price downturn better than their smaller peers, but they respond much more slowly to fluctuations in the oil market. That stability is a feature for many investors looking to avoid volatility, but it also means that 2017 may not bring much excitement from the majors.

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Shell Seeks to Streamline in 2017

…saddled with a mountain of debt…

By SARAH KENT: Jan. 3, 2017 7:00 a.m. ET

LONDON— Royal Dutch Shell PLC has a goal for 2017: Slimming down. The British-Dutch oil-and-gas giant bulked up in February with the roughly $50 billion acquisition of BG Group PLC, giving Shell a dominant position in liquefied natural gas and some of the world’s most prized offshore oil fields in Brazil. It also saddled the company with a mountain of debt—$78 billion at the end of the third quarter—that is higher than peers such as Exxon Mobil Corp.

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BP opts out of Iran deals ahead of Trump hard line on Tehran

by: Andrew Ward, Energy Editor: 2 Jan 2017

BP has opted out of the first wave of agreements to develop oil and gas reserves in Iran after the lifting of international sanctions — setting it apart from its two biggest European rivals Royal Dutch Shell and Total.

However, BP, which has its corporate roots in the Anglo-Persian Oil Company… is taking a more cautious approach ahead of a Donald Trump presidency which threatens renewed diplomatic tensions with Tehran.

FULL FT ARTICLE

Royal Dutch Shell plc and BP Pay Higher Dividends: Here’s Why?

Britain’s decision to exit the European Union came as a shock for many. During the initial phase of Britain’s exit, the pound depreciated tremendously and questions were raised regarding how companies would operate. But now, a few months later, it seems that stakeholders of a few companies greatly benefitted from the move. 

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As mentioned above, the Brexit decision led to a significant decline of the pound against the dollar. Oil and gas companies such as the likes of Royal Dutch Shell plc. (ADR) (NYSE:RDS.A) and BP plc. (ADR) (NYSE:BP) decided to capitalize on the decline by giving out lucrative bonuses to their shareholders. 

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Shell and BP’s UK dividend payments surge on weaker pound

Andrew Ward, Energy Editor

Royal Dutch Shell and BP have delivered a Christmas bonus worth almost £500m to UK shareholders because of the depreciation of the pound against the dollar since the vote to leave the EU.

Both UK oil majors have made quarterly payouts this month that were a fifth higher than a year ago due to their practice of setting dividends in dollars and paying them in sterling.

FULL FT ARTICLE

BP buys, while Shell sells: a recap of recent deal making by the majors

Written by Mark Lammey – 20/12/2016 6:00 am

While Shell has been selling assets to make good on its $30billion divestment plan for 2016-18, BP has flashed the cash with a number of big investments.

Shell said yesterday that it had raised $1.65billion (£1.33billion) in asset sales, while rival oil major BP has revealed plans to invest heavily on African licences.

Shell will make $1.4billion from the sale of a 31.2% stake in refiner Showa Shell Sekiyu to Japan’s Idemitsu Kosan, the firm said yesterday.

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Oil stocks surge, BP and Shell both climb on back of OPEC pact

Written by Reporter – 12/12/2016 1:20 pm

Oil stocks topped the FTSE 100 on Monday after non-Opec producers agreed to curb production to help buoy floundering crude prices.

The UK’s blue chip index was down 0.1% at around 6946.53 points, but Royal Dutch Shell’s ’B’ shares rose 3% and BP jumped 2.4%.

Away from the top tier, Tullow Oil soared 9.6% and Premier Oil surged 9.9%.

Sterling was flat against the dollar at 1.256, but down 0.3% against the euro at 1.187.

Brent crude prices climbed more than 5% to around 57.03 US dollars per barrel (£45.33) in early trading, marking its highest level since July 2015.

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Opec bends the markets

screen-shot-2016-12-03-at-08-16-41By Ed Crooks, December 2, 2016

In 451 CE, the great Roman general Flavius Aetius rallied a motley army of imperial troops and barbarian allies, and halted the advance of Attila’s Huns at the Catalaunian Plains in Gaul, buying the empire some time and temporarily interrupting its long-term decline. This week’s Opec meeting in Vienna had something of the same feel about it.

Opec’s power peaked in the 1970s, and the US shale oil revolution of the past half-decade has threatened to consign the cartel’s influence to history. But by agreeing a deal to cut production on Wednesday, the Opec ministers showed that if they all acted together they could still bend the oil markets to their will, at least for a while.

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Opec cuts neither dead nor alive

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By Ed Crooks November 28, 2016

Opec’s possible production cut is the oil market equivalent of Schrödinger’s cat: neither dead nor alive. When they met in Algiers in late September, Opec ministers agreed the need to reduce output, but left the allocation of the cuts between individual members to be finalised later. If they cannot agree on that, the deal will die. At their meeting in Vienna on Wednesday, the ministers will have to open the box, and we will find out whether or not the agreement is still breathing.

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Shell Tops Ranks Of Ideal Oil, Gas Employers

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By Irina Slav – Nov 15, 2016, 10:10 AM CST

Shell has emerged as the number-one employer in the energy industry, according to a Rigzone survey among 8,400 respondents in more than 100 countries. This is the first survey of this kind since the start of the price slump.

The top 10 of the best employers in the industry, according to the survey, is occupied by Big Oil and Big Oilfield Service, with Chevron at #2, Exxon at #3, and BP at #4. Halliburton was fifth, followed by Schlumberger, Aramco, Total, Baker Hughes, and Weatherford International at #10.

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Shell vs BP: which oil giant should you buy?

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By James Connington14 NOVEMBER 2016 

In the hunt for income‑producing stocks, BP and Royal Dutch Shell are two obvious candidates.

Both have so far kept dividend promises made before the oil price crash, leading to hefty yields: 7pc for BP and 6.7pc at Shell. But which firm is better placed to sustain such attractive dividends?

At first glance, it can look like splitting hairs. Each is prioritising dividend payments, although there is little chance of dividend growth.

Both have taken significant action to cut costs and sell assets in response to the lower oil price.

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Big Oil Looks Past Profit Crunch as Cash Flow Shows Recovery

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By Javier Blas: November 9, 2016

Ask any oil-company accountant, “what’s the difference between income and cash flow?” and they’re likely to say income makes the headlines, cash pays the bills.

It may be glib, but there’s a nub of truth there. Cash generation is the yardstick used to judge a company’s ability to invest and pay dividends, and it’s been growing at the biggest oil producers for three quarters in a row.

Last quarter the world’s largest listed energy companies — Exxon Mobil Corp., Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Chevron Corp., Total SA and BP Plc — reported cash from operations of almost $26 billion, up 67 percent from the previous three months and more than double the first-quarter amount, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

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Royal Dutch Shell: The Comeback Is Here

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Alpha Investor: Sunday Nov 6, 2016

Summary

  • Shell posted a massive turnaround in its bottom line last quarter on the back of an improved production profile, lower costs, and higher price realizations.
  • Shell’s financial improvement is set to continue going forward as upstream oil price realizations will continue to improve on the back of a positive demand-supply environment in the oil industry.
  • Oil demand has exceeded supply by 500,000 bpd this year and the trend will continue as the likes of Russia, Saudi Arabia, and the U.S. continue to reduce output.
  • Shell’s focus on lowering both operating and capital costs will allow it to attain break-even point even if oil prices remain at $50/barrel, which will also improve cash flow.

On Tuesday last week, Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) reported impressive results for the third quarter. In fact, Shell was able to achieve a major turnaround in its bottom line performance, posting a profit of $1.4 billion as compared to a huge loss of $6.1 billion in the same quarter last year. This impressive turnaround in Shell’s bottom line was a result of an increase in production as compared to the prior-year period, driven by the acquisition of BG that led to a favorable production mix in the upstream segment.

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Oil chiefs under fire over ‘pathetic’ new climate investment fund

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Emily Gosden, energy editor: 4 NOVEMBER 2016 • 7:53PM

Oil giants including BP and Shell have been pilloried by climate campaigners after disclosing their annual contributions to a much-hyped new green investment fund would be less than BP chief Bob Dudley earned last year.

Mr Dudley and Royal Dutch Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden were among industry heavyweights who appeared at an event in London to announce plans by the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI) to invest $1bn in “innovative low emissions technologies” over the next ten years.

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Hold the champagne

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screen-shot-2016-11-03-at-14-50-16By Ed Crooks, November 4, 2016

If you are looking forward to the oil industry recovery, you shouldn’t break out the champagne just yet.

Over the past eight days, the world’s largest listed oil companies have released third quarter earnings reports. From all of them, the message was that while the worst might be over, they were still facing a long hard road ahead.

The snap reactions from the stock market were mixed: positive for  ChevronRoyal Dutch ShellTotal and ConocoPhillips; negative for ExxonMobilBPEniStatoilPetrochina and Cnooc.

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Oil majors pledge $1 billion for technologies to fight climate change

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By Karolin Schaps and Ron Bousso | LONDON

Some of the world’s biggest oil companies, including Saudi Aramco and Royal Dutch Shell, pledged on Friday to invest $1 billion to help fight climate change as a global deal to wean the world off fossil fuels came into force.

The Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI), which also includes Total, BP, Eni, Repsol, Statoil, CNPC, Pemex [PEMX.UL] and Reliance Industries, has established the Climate Investments fund which will help develop carbon-reducing technologies over the coming ten years.

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BP plc and Royal Dutch Shell plc aren’t out of the woods just yet

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By Ian Pierce – Friday, 4 November, 2016

It’s been a good few weeks for investors who kept faith in oil majors’ ability to survive slumping prices. First there was the OPEC supply cut agreement made in Algeria and then Q3 earnings season rolled around and included a slew of positive trading updates. (LSE: BP) posted a $1.6bn replacement cost profit, a 34% jump from last year’s number. And Shell (LSE: RDSB) earned $1.4bn on a current cost of supplies basis, a long way from the $6.1bn loss recorded this time last year.

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Oil majors join forces in climate push with renewable energy fund

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By Ron Bousso | LONDON

Top oil companies including Saudi Aramco and Shell are joining forces to create an investment fund to develop technologies to promote renewable energy, as they seek an active role in the fight against global warming, sources said.

The chief executives of seven oil and gas companies — BP, Eni, Repsol, Saudi Aramco, Royal Dutch Shell, Statoil and Total — will announce details of the fund and other steps to reduce greenhouse gases in London on Friday.

The sector faces mounting pressure to take an active role in the fight against global warming, and Friday’s event will coincide with the formal entry into force of the 2015 Paris Agreement to phase out man-made greenhouse gases in the second half of the century.

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Oil stand-off threatens dividends at BP and Shell amid fears that a deal to prop up prices is about to collapse

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By SABAH MEDDINGS FOR THE DAILY MAILPUBLISHED: 23:34, 1 November 2016 | UPDATED: 23:34, 1 November 2016

Dividends at BP and Shell are set to come under threat as fears grow that a deal to prop up oil prices is about to collapse.

The two oil giants yesterday reported better-than-expected results – and gave a boost to their millions of small shareholders by protecting payouts.

But they have only been able to keep their dividends after slashing billions of pounds in costs following a collapse in the oil price from $112 a barrel in 2014 to less than $30.

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Shell and BP tighten the belt over low oil prices with spending cuts

screen-shot-2016-11-02-at-11-05-51PUBLISHED: 07:22, Wed, Nov 2, 2016 | UPDATED: 07:41, Wed, Nov 2, 2016

The FTSE 100 rivals warned investors not to expect a big upturn next year as they plan for prices in the low $50s-per barrel compared with current rates of about $48 for Brent.

But their efforts to balance investment in future growth while battling tough trading conditions and rising debt met with contrasting reactions as Shell’s share price rallied 84p to 2199p while BP slumped 21¾p to 462p.

Shell, whose £35billion acquisition of BG Group made it the world’s top liquefied natural gas producer, boosted underlying net profit for the three months to the end of September by 18 per cent to $2.8billion, compared with analysts’ forecasts of $1.71billion.

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BP And Shell Optimistic The Market Is Turning

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screen-shot-2016-11-01-at-16-01-19By Nick Cunningham – Nov 01, 2016, 6:23 PM CDT

BP and Royal Dutch Shell reported their latest financial figures for the third quarter and both companies showed some improvement, a sign that the oil markets are starting to find their footing.

A few days ago, some of the other oil majors released third quarter earnings, revealing the ongoing damage being done to the balance sheets of even the largest oil companies. But BP and Shell offered some reasons for optimism for the industry.

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No let-up for Royal Dutch Shell and BP amid oil price crash

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Taken together, the lesson of the past six months is that both UK-listed oil majors remain under intense pressure from weak oil prices but are making progress towards reshaping their businesses to cope with the slump.

Yet, the scale of the financial gamble was evident in the tripling of Shell’s net debt from a year ago to almost $78bn at the end September. This represented a debt-to-equity ratio of 29.2 per cent, close to the 30 per cent level which Shell has previously declared as the upper limit at which it was comfortable operating.

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Shell’s Record BG Deal Starts to Pay Off as Production Surges

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screen-shot-2016-11-01-at-16-01-19By Rakteem Katakey: November 1, 2016

Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s biggest takeover, the subject of intense investor scrutiny during crude’s collapse, is starting to pay off as Europe’s largest oil company chalks up its highest profit in five quarters.

The cash now generated by BG Group Plc — acquired by Shell for $54 billion in February — outstrips its spending, while production has risen by about a third in two years, Shell Chief Financial Officer Simon Henry said Tuesday. The integration of its assets has been completed “well ahead of time,” he said.

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Shell’s $78 Billion Escape Act

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screen-shot-2016-10-06-at-13-11-55By Chris HughesNov 1, 2016 8:38 AM EDT

Eight months on from the $64 billion acquisition of BG Group and Royal Dutch Shell PLC’s finances seem to be under greater strain than ever. The Anglo-Dutch oil major’s net borrowings stand at $78 billion and indebtedness is a smidgen below management’s self-imposed ceiling. Even as the benefits of buying BG are starting to show, the takeover has trapped Shell in austerity measures for the foreseeable future. The good news is that progress is likely to be visible, and that provides a useful story for the shares.

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Shell’s earnings beat Exxon as oil majors adapt to low prices

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By Ron Bousso and Karolin Schaps | LONDON

Royal Dutch/Shell and BP on Tuesday joined peers in reporting higher than expected earnings by making further deep cuts in spending to cope with an oil price downturn now in its third year.

Shell’s stocks rose by over 3 percent as it announced higher quarterly earnings than arch-rival U.S. Exxon Mobil, the world’s largest listed company by output. Anglo-Dutch Shell is hoping to outgrow Exxon over the next few years after acquiring rival BG for $54 billion earlier this year.

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Shell Smashes Estimates as BG Acquisition Drives Up Output

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By Rakteem Katakey: November 1, 2016

Royal Dutch Shell Plc reported third-quarter profit that beat analyst estimates after its acquisition of BG Group Plc boosted oil production, helping to counter a slump in prices. The shares rose.

Profit adjusted for one-time items and inventory changes advanced 17 percent from a year earlier to $2.79 billion, The Hague-based Shell said Tuesday. That exceeded the $1.79 billion average estimate of 14 analysts surveyed by Bloomberg, and the earnings of U.S. giant Exxon Mobil Corp.

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BP, Shell Help Lift Oil-Trading Profitability to 6-Year High

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By Javier Blas and Andy Hoffman: October 26, 2016

The trading arms of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc enjoyed their best year ever in 2015, helping push the combined gross margins of oil merchants to a six-year high, according to a closely watched report.

Oil traders last year “stormed ahead, thanks to low, volatile spot prices that created cash-and-carry opportunities,” consultancy Oliver Wyman said in its annual review of the commodities-trading industry published Wednesday.

These gross margins — a rough measure of profitability — rose to a combined $19 billion, the highest since 2009, when oil traders benefited from big price swings and oversupplied markets. For commodities traders in general, total gross margins stagnated at $44 billion for the second consecutive year as natural gas, power and other markets underperformed oil.

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Fitch: Batteries could be key disruptor to oil industry in “investor death spiral”

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Oct 18 2016, 12:45 ET | By: Carl Surran, SA News Editor

Oil producers such as ExxonMobil (NYSE:XOM), Chevron (NYSE:CVX) and Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) must prepare for radical change as adoption of new technologies like electric cars could happen faster than originally anticipated, according to a new report from Fitch Ratings.

“Widespread adoption of battery-powered vehicles is a serious threat to the oil industry,” and an acceleration of the electrification of transport infrastructure could create an “investor death spiral” as investors flee the oil patch, Fitch warns.

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How electric cars could smash BP plc and Royal Dutch Shell plc

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By Harvey Jones – Tuesday, 18 October, 2016

Investors in UK-listed oil giants (LSE: BP) and Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) have been paying close attention to the oil price because they know that unless it climbs higher, their juicy 7%-plus dividend yields will be in jeopardy. However, they need to look to more distant horizons, because even if the oil price does climb a little higher this year, the long-term outlook is mixed.

Golden years

I’ve always thought ‘black gold’ to be a rather daft a description for oil, given that gold has few practical uses but the global economy runs on crude. However, that may not always be the case, due to the rise of electric vehicles and renewable energy. A new report from the World Energy Council suggests these two trends could hit demand for oil sooner and harder than expected. Oil consumption could actually start falling within the next 10 to 15 years and if correct, this would play havoc with the investment case for BP and Shell.

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Shell, BP Hold Lure of Higher Payouts After Brexit Hurts Pound

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screen-shot-2016-10-06-at-13-11-55By Rakteem Katakey: October 12, 2016

The British pound’s slump to a 30-year low is handing a windfall to U.K.-based shareholders of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc.

The currency’s decline means the two oil companies are making higher payouts to U.K. investors when they distribute their dollar dividends in pounds. Shell and BP have pledged to prioritize defending their dividends through oil’s biggest downturn in a generation.

The companies have maintained their payouts for the past two years and shareholders who have stayed invested through crude’s slump are likely to get additional cash in the U.K. currency as the pound remains weak following Britain’s June 23 decision to exit the European Union. The potential for higher cash payouts is driving up the companies’ London-listed shares. U.S. investors get no benefit from the currency’s more than 17 percent slide against the dollar in the period, which makes the pound the worst performer among major currencies.

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Oil: OPEC Finally Agrees And Investor Takeaways

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Dividend Income: 5 October 2016

Summary

  • OPEC has agreed to put a ceiling on oil production at 32.5 million barrels per day, representing a 900k cut from its current output at 33.4 million.
  • The news supported oil’s rise by nearly 10 percent, and benefits some companies significantly more than others.
  • The author still recommends to stay away from offshore, but upstream producers with lower break even cost could be an attractive investment. Integrated majors’ dividends are also safer than ever.

News Summary

To the surprise of everyone, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Nations (OPEC) has agreed to put a ceiling on oil production at 32.5 million barrels per day, which is significantly less than its current 33.4 million barrels per day of production. The news has helped oil price rally nearly 10% to almost $51.50 per barrel Brent.

In this article, I will try to dissect the news and its effect on integrated majors, upstream producers and offshore producers. Of course, the news benefit some of these companies significantly more than others, which are actually unaffected or evenly negatively affected by the news. Similarly, I will analyze how it will affect the United State Oil ETF (NYSEARCA:USO) and other oil related ETFs going forward.

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Shell, Chevron Drop Off Platts Top 10 Energy Firm List

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screen-shot-2016-09-20-at-21-16-05By Irina Slav – Oct 03, 2016, 10:26 AM CDT

Shell and Chevron were among the international oil giants that fell off the top 10 companies of 2016 in the S&P Platts’ annual ranking of the 250 biggest companies by assets and revenues. The asset value and revenue figures are all for 201—the year when the oil price collapse really began to be felt.

The USA Today quotes Platts as saying the changes in the top 10 segment reflected the continuing depression on international oil markets. The price slump, Platts said, hit oil and gas majors’ earnings hard, and it also led to a serious devaluation of assets, meanwhile benefiting companies with stronger downstream operations, pure-play refiners, and power utilities.

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Opec’s unclear resolve

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Opec’s unclear resolve

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By Ed Crooks, September 30, 2016

After two years of inaction as a strategy, Opec this week decided to do… something. Exactly what it will end up doing has yet to be determined.

When Opec ministers met at a beach resort in Algiers, they agreed a statement setting a target for their oil production that is roughly 250,000-750,000 barrels per day lower than the cartel’s current output. The big missing piece from the deal, though, was how the cartel’s members would share out the cuts needed to reach that target. A “high-level committee” of representatives from member states, supported by the Opec secretariat, will work on recommendations for individual countries’ cuts, which could be confirmed at the next ministerial meeting, in Vienna on November 30.

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Is OPEC’s Output Deal A Game Changer For Royal Dutch Shell And BP?

Is OPEC’s Output Deal A Game Changer For Royal Dutch Shell And BP?

Royston Wild: Sept 29, 2016

Investors in the fossil fuel sector have finally had cause to celebrate this week after OPEC suggested that an output freeze could finally be in the offing.

The idea had initially been tabled at the start of the year as Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Venezuela and Russia got around the table. But Iran’s determination to get the pumps ramped back up to pre-sanction levels put the plan firmly on the backburner.

However, with Tehran’s reluctance to take part in a deal now apparently thawing, stock pickers have become more optimistic over the growth outlook for many of the oil industry’s major players.

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Shell and BP shareholders can use votes to make firms go green, campaign group says

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Screen Shot 2016-08-04 at 14.47.05Shell and BP shareholders can use votes to make firms go green, campaign group says

Written by Mark Lammey – 29/09/2016 7:42 am

A campaign group is urging Shell and BP shareholders to use binding votes on pay plans to encourage bosses to embrace green energy, a news report said yesterday.

ShareAction said sticking with old remuneration policies that reward executives for digging for oil would lead to both companies becoming obsolete and going bankrupt, The Guardian reported.

In line with rules introduced in 2013, large companies like Shell and BP face binding shareholder votes on three-year pay policies next year, the report said.

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Shares in oil giants BP and Shell surge on production cut deal

Shares in oil giants BP and Shell surge on production cut deal

The agreement by OPEC countries boosts hopes for a sector which has seen mass job cuts, but could push up prices at the pump.

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Thursday 29 September 2016

Shares in Royal Dutch Shell and BP have surged after top oil producing countries agreed to cut production for the first time in eight years.

Shell climbed 6% and BP was up 4% following the decision by OPEC – with other commodity firms also performing strongly.

The stocks helped the FTSE 100 Index turn 1% higher, with improvements also seen in French and German markets, following an upturn for Asian shares overnight.

OPEC’s agreement on Wednesday helped the price of a barrel of Brent crude climb above $49 overnight, before slipping back slightly.

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BP and Shell investors urged to reward bosses for backing green energy

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Screen Shot 2016-08-04 at 14.47.05BP and Shell investors urged to reward bosses for backing green energy

Shareholders should use binding votes on pay policies next year to push executives to stick to climate goals, says ShareAction

Sean FarrellThursday 29 September 2016 00.01 BST

Shell and BP’s pay plans encourage their bosses to dig for oil instead of investing in low-carbon energy and should be overhauled by shareholders, according to the campaign group ShareAction.

Investors in the oil companies should use binding votes on pay policies next year to scrap short-term targets and reward chief executives for working towards the target set in Paris last December to limit global temperature increases to 2C or less, the responsible investment group says in a report.

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