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A decisive step to a cleaner energy future

Chief Executive Officer at Shell

It’s time for Shell to accelerate its efforts in the transition to a lower-carbon world. This is how I plan to drive change through the company.

How will a future CEO of Shell judge what I have just announced? Will they look back to the end of 2017 and consider it a turning point? In 20 years? 30 years? If things move as I expect, they probably will.

By then, I believe Shell will be at least as profitable and successful as today but it will be a very different company.

We will still have plenty of oil and gas in our energy mix but other areas of the business, which are small today, will have grown. read more

Law firm seeks criminal case against Shell and its CEO over Nigeria deal

LONDON (Reuters) – A Dutch law firm has asked the public prosecutor in the Netherlands to file a case against Royal Dutch Shell, its CEO and former executives of over what it says were criminal actions relating to a 2011 oilfield purchase in Nigeria.

The Dutch authorities are already investigating the oilfield deal, alongside Italian prosecutors, who want to take Shell and Italy’s Eni to trial over alleged corruption on the same oilfield.

Shell and Eni have denied any wrongdoing. Shell said on Tuesday it did not believe there was any basis to prosecute the company or any current or former employee. read more

Malabu Scam: Human Rights Group File Criminal Complaint Against Shell In Netherland

Specifically, the criminal complaint is aimed at Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Shell Petroleum N.V., and former or current directors Peter Voser, German Burmeister, Simon Henry and Ben van Beurden.

Prankken d’Oliveira, a group of Amsterdam-based lawyers, on Tuesday, submitted a criminal complaint against Shell and some of the company’s former directors in relation to Shell’s dodgy acquisition of the exploitation rights to the Nigerian oil block, OPL245, from Malabu Oil and Gas, a Nigerian shell company suspected to have been illegally awarded the licence to Mr. Dan Etete, while he was Nigeria’s Petroleum Minister. This was disclosed in a statement issued by the lawyers on Tuesday.

BY SAHARA REPORTERS, NEW YORK: DEC 05, 2017

Prankken d’Oliveira, a group of Amsterdam-based lawyers, on Tuesday, submitted a criminal complaint against Shell and some of the company’s former directors in relation to Shell’s dodgy acquisition of the exploitation rights to the Nigerian oil block, OPL245, from Malabu Oil and Gas, a Nigerian shell company suspected to have been illegally awarded the licence to Mr. Dan Etete, while he was Nigeria’s Petroleum Minister. This was disclosed in a statement issued by the lawyers on Tuesday. read more

U.S. oil majors fall behind on climate, European lead

Major European oil companies are making major efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to fight climate change. American majors are dragging their behinds.

Royal Dutch Shell pledged Tuesday to slash carbon emission by 50 percent and boost investment in clean, renewable energy. CEO Ben van Beurden promised to spend at least $2 billion on on wind power, biofuels and electric cars, about the same amount it will spend on shale oil.

“It is making sure that the products within society have an overall lower carbon footprint,” Beurden told investors, according to the Guardian newspaper. “That is the long-term way of making sure our business remains a relevant business in the face of the energy transition.” read more

Only collaboration will solve the global warming puzzle

BEN VAN BEURDEN: 30 NOVEMBER 2017

The world has a puzzle to solve, a jigsaw with a spectacular number of pieces to place. If it can succeed it will win a priceless prize: it will achieve the goal of the Paris Agreement, to limit global warming to under 2C. It is the puzzle of the energy transition.

Piecing together a solution is going to be tricky and we at Shell have been trying to make progress as a company. We have a way forward now and I am going to share it with you. But first, the jigsaw. read more

Shell damps down Prelude LNG expectations

by Angela Macdonald-Smith: Nov 29, 2017

Royal Dutch Shell has sewn doubt in the market about an early 2018 start-up of the oil major’s innovative Prelude floating LNG project off the coast of north-west Australia, with chief executive Ben van Beurden signalling that the project will only start contributing noticeably to cash flow in 2019.

While the ramp-up of the $US54 billion (71 billion) Gorgon LNG project in Western Australia was named by Mr van Beurden as among projects named to help grow cash flows next year, Prelude was included in the later batch. read more

Shell, to Cut Carbon Output, Will Be Less of an Oil Company

By Nov. 28, 2017

Bowing to pressure from shareholders and the Paris international climate accord, Royal Dutch Shell pledged on Tuesday to increase its investment in renewable fuels and to cut its carbon emissions in half by 2050.

Shell and other big oil companies have moved only sporadically over the last decade toward greater production of wind and solar energy. Now there are signs of a commitment to take climate change more seriously.

In comments to investors, Ben van Beurden, Shell’s chief executive, said that from 2018 to 2020, the company’s new-energies division would spend up to $2 billion a year on renewable energy sources like wind, solar and hydrogen power and on electric-car charging stations. read more

Shell signals an end to the oil downturn with return of all-cash payouts

Jillian Ambrose: 

Royal Dutch Shell has signalled the end of the three-year oil market downturn by restarting its all-cash shareholder payouts as its cash flow begins to boom.

The oil major began paying out dividends in the form of shares in 2015, in the wake of the oil price crash and its $50bn takeover of BG Group.

But chief executive Ben van Beurden said the Anglo-Dutch group was now confident that it could call an end its scrip dividend as its cost-cutting and divestment programme pays off. read more

Shell signals return to pure cash dividend, focus on renewables

FILE PHOTO: Ben van Beurden, chief executive officer of Royal Dutch Shell, speaks during a news conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, February 15, 2016. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes /File Photo

Ron Bousso: NOVEMBER 18, 2017

LONDON (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) will return to paying pure cash dividends and step up its investment in cleaner energy as it turns a corner after more than two years of cost cuts and disposals prompted by weak oil prices.

Shell Chief Executive Officer Ben van Beurden sought to strike a balance between reassuring investors it can increase returns in its core fossil fuel business during an “era of volatility” in oil prices while preparing to step up investments in renewables. read more

Shell Updates Company Strategy and Financial Outlook

NEWS PROVIDED BY: Royal Dutch Shell plc

THE HAGUE, Netherlands, November 28, 2017 /PRNewswire/ —

  • Scrip dividend programme to be cancelled with effect from the fourth quarter 2017 dividend
  • Annual organic free cash flow outlook increased to $25 to $30 billionby 2020, at $60 per barrel (real terms 2016)
  • Company sets ambition to reduce the net carbon footprint of its energy products in step with societys drive to align with the Paris Agreement goals

Royal Dutch Shell plc (Shell) (NYSE: RDS.A) (NYSE: RDS.B) Chief Executive Officer, Ben van Beurden, today updated investors on the company’s strategy, setting out plans to grow returns and free cash flow, and outlining its ambition to reduce the net carbon footprint of its energy products.

“Our next steps as we re-shape Shell into a world-class investment aim to ensure that our company can continue to thrive, not just in the short and medium term but for many decades to come,” said van Beurden. “These steps build on the foundations of Shell’s strong operational and financial performance, and my confidence in our strategy and our ability to deliver on the promises we make.” read more

Shell scraps scrip dividend after three years of austerity

Ron Bousso: NOVEMBER 28, 2017

LONDON, Nov 28 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell on Tuesday said it will cancel an austerity dividend policy as the oil and gas company boosted its cash generation forecasts, drawing a line under three years of oil price turmoil.

The Anglo-Dutch company said it will abolish its scrip dividend, through which investors can opt to receive dividends in shares or cash, in the fourth quarter of 2017. The scrip dividend scheme was introduced in early 2015 following the sharp drop in oil prices. read more

Shell prepares to reward investors by restoring bigger cash payouts

Royal Dutch Shell introduced its scrip dividend programme in 2015 (Source: Getty)

Oliver Gill: Sunday 26 November 2017 6:14pm

Oil behemoth Royal Dutch Shell has been tipped to dish out more cash to investors as it scraps a programme of paying dividends in the form of shares. Analysts from UBS believe it is a case of “when not if” Shell restores a full cash dividend.

Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden is expected to signal the changes at a London management day on Tuesday.

The oil giant put a scrip dividend programme – where part of the firm’s dividend is paid by issuing new shares – in place in 2015 to reduce demands on cash as debt spiralled. Shell’s cash reserves were put under pressure by a combination of soft oil prices and a £47bn deal to buy gas producer BG. read more

Ben van Beurden prepares to restore Royal Dutch Shell cash dividend

Royal Dutch Shell is tipped to resume paying all its dividend in cash this week — unplugging a gusher worth billions of pounds for investors.

Chief executive Ben van Beurden is expected to signal the move on Tuesday, when he lays out his vision for Britain’s most valuable public company.

Abandoning the so-called scrip dividend programme would mark the latest stage in the Anglo-Dutch company’s recovery from the depths of the oil industry downturn. The company has paid a slice of its dividend in stock since early 2015, when the plunging oil price forced Van Beurden to marshal resources. read more

Shell Swallows BG Group Whole Hog, Rolls Up Cash Flow

Ray Merola: Nov. 6, 2017

Summary

  • Shell is enjoying a remarkably successful corporate resurgence.
  • Legacy BG Group opex and capex has been absorbed entirely without a loss of combined hydrocarbon volumes.
  • Cash is king.
  • Debt is trending down.  The dividend is well-covered.  Returns are solid, and improving.
  • I remain constructive on RDS stock.

I’ve been pounding my fist on the table for Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A) (RDS.B) for a couple of years now. It’s been that one, “fat pitch” worth waiting upon; these don’t come along very often. Since the end of 2015, ADR shares offered investors ~54% total return, or an 80% gain since the stock bottomed in January 2016.

The 3Q report included the hallmarks of recent previous quarters: linked-quarter revenue growth, continued strong cash flow, improving return-on-capital, reduced gearing, steady production, and ample dividend coverage. Details are found here. read more

Royal Dutch Shell takes cashflow crown off Exxon Mobil

Royal Dutch Shell has taken Exxon Mobil’s cashflow crown, a year after completing the biggest deal in its history.

Europe’s largest energy company vaulted ahead on this closely watched indicator of financial health in the first nine months of 2017 as assets acquired from BG Group from Brazil to Australia churned out cash. For the year as a whole, Shell is on course to surpass its larger US rival on the measure for the first time in about two decades.

Shell generated $28.38 billion (€24.34bn) of cashflow from operations in the first nine months of the year, compared with $23.52 billion (€20.18bn) from Exxon. Chief executive Ben Van Beurden has already spelled out that his main long-term goal was overtaking Exxon to become the best-performing oil major. read more

Oil rebound drives Shell to booming profits

Jillian Ambrose: 

Royal Dutch Shell became the latest major oil company to deliver better than expected earnings in recent months as the market recovery begins to gain traction.

The Anglo-Dutch oil giant reported $4.1bn (£3bn) in earnings for the last quarter on a current cost of supply basis, its standard measure of profitability. The sum comes in well above analyst forecasts that the group would make $3.6bn for the latest quarter.

Shell’s quarterly earnings are almost 50pc higher than in the same quarter last year, when they reached $2.8bn. read more

Shell beats profit forecasts, targets lower 2017 spending

Ron Bousso

LONDON (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) reported an 18 percent rise in third-quarter profit on Tuesday, lowering next year’s capital spending to the bottom of the expected range as it grapples with persistently low oil prices and weak refining margins.

The Anglo-Dutch oil major, whose acquisition of BG Group transformed it into the world’s top liquefied natural gas producer, has been under pressure from shareholders to cut annual spending to ensure it can maintain its dividend given the slow recovery in the oil prices LCOc1. read more

Shell submits new plans for Fram field development

Written by

Shell is targeting first gas from the field, which lies 136miles east of Aberdeen, in the second quarter of 2020.

The company intends to develop the gas and gas condensate field via a tie-back to the Shearwater platform 20 miles away.

The submission of the plans comes about two months after Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden said the company was committed to the North Sea, despite agreeing to sell a package of assets in the basin to Chrysaor earlier this year. read more

Shell has seen the future – and it’s several shades of green

Ben Van Beurden, chief executive officer of Royal Dutch Shell, sees a future dominated by gas and renewables, with gas the clear winner. Photo: Bloomberg

By Ben Marlow: 

If there is one subject that divides energy producers it’s the question of when oil demand will peak.

Indeed, it is such a controversial topic that some senior figures like Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister, Khalid al-Falih, prefer not to discuss it at all.

He claims talk of peak demand is dangerous. It threatens to reduce vital investment, “compromising” energy security, al-Falih said earlier this year.

John Watson, boss of American oil giant Chevron, recently dismissed the idea of peak demand as “wishful thinking”. read more

Shell cancels Thai sale, hits $25bn in divestments

Shell today confirmed a U-turn on the planned sale of its Shell Integrated Gas Thailand Pte. Limited (SIGT).

Written by

It comes as the firm revealed it had hit $25billion worth of investments. The oil major is targeting $30billion worth of investments by the end of 2018.

A spokesperson said: “Royal Dutch Shell announces today that its subsidiary, BG Asia Pacific Holdings Pte Limited, and KUFPEC Thailand Holdings Pte Limited, a subsidiary of Kuwait Foreign Petroleum Exploration Company (KUFPEC), have mutually agreed to cancel the Sale & Purchase Agreement for the share sale of Shell Integrated Gas Thailand Pte. Limited (SIGT) and Thai Energy Co Limited (TEC). read more

Shell takes cautious approach to green energy transition

by Andrew Ward, Energy Editor: 1 Oct 2017

Mr van Beurden, chief executive of Shell, allows himself only the briefest self-congratulation. “All the milestones, we are either ahead or on track,” he tells the Financial Times, referring to targets set at the time of the takeover. “But you are never done in this industry because everything is always in continuous decline.” The Dutchman is talking about the relentless pressure to find new resources… FULL ARTICLE

Lower for longer oil prices vs higher, sooner

by : Sunday 1 Oct 2017

To clarify Ben van Beurden’s point, he was not forecasting that oil would be “lower forever”; he meant that Shell should be operating with the mindset that it might be. If you are a risk-averse oil producer, that makes sense. Oil consumers should probably likewise be thinking about the possibility that prices could be higher, sooner.

FULL FT ARTICLE

Shell CEO van Beurden says oil prices will be around $60 by the end of the decade

  • It would not be “unreasonable” to forecast oil at $60 a barrel at the end of the decade, said Royal Dutch Shell CEO Ben van Beurden
  • Oil supply was more unpredictable than demand, van Beurden added

| : 27 Sept 2017

It’s “not unreasonable” to expect oil prices at $60 a barrel by the end of the decade, Royal Dutch Shell CEO Ben van Beurden told CNBC’s “Managing Asia.”

To be sure, that’s not a large rise from current levels.

Brent crude rose 0.38 percent to trade at $58.66 a barrel in Wednesday Asia trade, after hitting a 26-month high on Tuesday, while U.S. crudewas higher by 0.5 percent at $52.14 at 12:00 p.m. HK/SIN. read more

It’s Not Just The CEO’s Car: Shell Converts Corporate Fleet To Plug-In Hybrids

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Shell CEO Ben van Beurden made headlines worldwide when he told an interviewer in July that his next car would be an electric vehicle, but he stopped short of a full disclosure: van Beurden’s new car is part of a company-wide conversion of the corporate fleet.

Shell Technology Director Harry Brekelmans clarified this month that he too is getting a plug-in vehicle, though it’s a hybrid:

“Indeed Ben’s next car is electrical, but what he also says time and again is that fossil fuels will remain a part of the energy mix for decades to come, so his next car’s a hybrid, not a full EV,” Brekelmans said in appearance at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “And I know because my next car also will be a hybrid, because we’re changing the corporate fleet.” read more

Oil firm Shell planning to open its first UK electric car charging point next month

Oil firm Shell is planning to open its first UK electric car charging point next month.

Cars will be able to re-charge at a yet-to-be disclosed location in London.

Bosses are trying to adapt as transport and other industries move away from fossil fuels. Demand for electric cars is expected to soar, with about 150m on the roads by 2040.

Shell expects to open around 10 electric charging points around London by the end of the year. More will follow depending on customer demand. The firm ultimately wants 20 per cent of its retail fuel margins globally to come from non-diesel or petrol cars. read more

Shell and Petrobras sign technical cooperation agreement to strengthen deep water partnership

NEWS PROVIDED BY: Shell Oil CompanySep 11, 2017, 14:14 ET

RIO DE JANEIRO, Sept. 11, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Royal Dutch Shell and Petrobras signed last week in The Hague, Netherlands, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to establish a long-term mutual collaboration in developing pre-salt fields in Brazil.

In true partnership spirit between two of the world’s largest energy companies, Shell will benefit from technical solutions, contract management expertise and cost efficient initiatives Petrobras applies to Brazil’s pre and post-salt projects. Shell will share with Petrobras its global deep water experience, especially on cost efficiency efforts and use of technology. read more

The North Sea Oil Recovery Is Dead In The Water

By Nick Cunningham – Sep 07, 2017, 6:00 PM CDT

The oil majors issued a vote of confidence for the North Sea in recent days, citing precipitous declines in the cost of production, which they say will revive the region’s oil and gas production.

At an oil industry conference in the North Sea’s oil capital, Aberdeen, the chief executives of BP and Royal Dutch Shell both offered bullish assessments for the turnaround underway off the coast of Scotland. BP’s Bob Dudley said the North Sea is “back to growth,” according to the FT. read more

Shell Invests to Boost Global Gas Demand

Europe’s biggest energy company is investing in projects to boost global gas demand and aims to continue feeding the market it’s nurturing with new liquefied natural gas export plants.

Royal Dutch Shell Plc is supporting the development of gas use in heavy transport such as shipping and is also helping smaller and less credit worthy customers begin importing LNG, Maarten Wetselaar, the company’s director of integrated gas and new energies, said at an event at Bloomberg’s Sydney office Wednesday. As new LNG customers enter the market, that will open a window for Shell and others to develop new low-cost export plants. read more

Shell Is Nothing Short Of Exemplary

Earnings Forecast Focus: Sep. 5, 2017 6:49 PM ET

Summary

  • Shell CEO Ben van Beurden’s “lower forever” quote was aimed at operating costs and overall company culture. It does not reflect the CEO’s oil price outlook.
  • The company’s operational excellence has been nothing short of exemplary.
  • Scrip dividend will be removed when gearing is down to 20% from the current 25%.
  • At the current rate, it should take no more than twelve months to reduce the gearing to 20%.
  • Obviously, the dividend is safe. More importantly, this is an opportunity to buy a company with excellent leadership.

Royal Dutch Shell’s (RDS.A) (RDS.B) transformation under CEO Ben van Beurden has been truly remarkable. The relatively new CEO has put his mark on the company. He has shown that Shell, under his leadership, has the ability to navigate the downturn with relative ease. Not only that, he has shown the ability to transform a company when most other companies are busy trying to survive. While I won’t be spending much time on the dividend safety, as that has been made clear over and over again, it is safe to say that the 6.6% yield is beyond safe. Investors now have the opportunity to purchase a 6.6% yield with additional capital appreciation should oil rebound. read more

The North Sea must ‘earn its right to grow’, says Shell boss

Jillian Ambrose: 

The North Sea still has the support of supermajors BP and Royal Dutch Shell but the basin will need to earn its right to grow within a rapidly changing energy landscape, oil bosses have warned.

Oil industry heavyweights have converged on Aberdeen this week for a conference focused on the future of the North Sea as oil majors shift their portfolios towards low cost oil, petroleum products, gas and even renewables.

Ben Van Beurden, Shell’s chief executive, said the Anglo-Dutch group is still committed to the basin after its $3bn sell-off to private equity backed Chrysaor, but added that the North Sea needs to “earn its right to grow” amid “challenging times” for the oil and gas sector. read more

Shell’s Ben van Beurden: Oil vs Uber in the battle of reputations

In a throwaway comment, Ben van Beurden found himself front and centre on the national media’s radar. “It wasn’t a planned remark, it just came out,” he said.

Written by

But it wasn’t oil price, or strategy that landed him prime time interviews.

Instead, it was the comment that his next car would be electric.

“It wasn’t a planned remark, it just came out,” he said.

“But it shows how charismatic renewables and electricity is at the moment, much more charismatic than gas and definitely much more charismatic than oil.”

A perception that oil and gas have a shrinking role to play is one the industry needs to address head-on. read more

Exclusive Interview: Ben van Beurden – No North Sea retreat

A North Sea retreat is not on the cards for Shell, according to its chief executive.

Shell’s “rejuvenation” in the North Sea…

Written by

Ben van Beurden hailed the region’s “tremendous” progress.

His commitment to the region comes after it sold more than half of its North Sea oil and gas fields for $3.8billion to Chrysaor.

The sell-off included interests in the fields Buzzard, Beryl, Bressay, Elgin-Franklin, J-Block, the Greater Armada cluster, Everest, Lomond and Erskine, and a 10% stake in Schiehallion.

Mr van Beurden insisted the shift in assets was about breathing new life into the portfolio Shell ring-fenced to keep. read more

Exclusive: Shell’s CEO – Oil slide is “biggest blessing”

“There were a few mishaps in BG that really hammered their share price and we saw them coming into this funny situation where the share price came down, but we could only see the value go up so we needed to take a hardened look at it again,” Mr van Beurden said. “And then while we were looking at it the oil price started crashing, which actually opened the window even further.”

Energy editor Rita Brown heads to the Hague to hear exclusively how Shell’s chief executive has viewed the last three years since the oil price crash

Written by

Ben van Beurden’s rise to the top coincided with the oil price riding the crest of a wave.

But for a man who assumed Shell’s chief executive role just months before it all came crashing down, he sums up the last three years as “a blessing”.

“Less than a year into my new role, the oil price started going down and it’s been quite a journey, but if I look back on it I think this is probably the biggest blessing that I’ve had,” he said.

“It has done two things. First of all it provided a tremendous amount of focus on the things that needed doing. I mean, there’s nothing like a crisis to focus on cost efficiency. read more

Oil giants donate $23 million for Harvey victims

Extracts from unedited feed from the Press Trust of India wire.

September 4, 2017 | UPDATED 03:55 IST

By Seema Hakhu Kachru

Houston, Sep 4 (PTI) US oil giants have pledged USD 23 million for disaster relief operations to help Gulf Coast residents recover from Hurricane Harvey, one of the most destructive storms in US history that killed at least 50 people.

Harvey has soaked Texas with the heaviest rainfall in US history. Texas officials said more than 185,000 homes were damaged and 9,000 destroyed as 42,000 people remain in shelters amid overflowing rivers and reservoirs. read more

What You Missed in Royal Dutch Shell plc’s Quarterly Report

Global energy giant Royal Dutch Shell hinted at how one number, over time, could change the future of the company

Reuben Gregg Brewer: (TMFReubenGBrewer): Sep 1, 2017 at 9:16AM Royal Dutch Shell plc (NYSE:RDS-A) (NYSE:RDS-B) is one of the world’s largest integrated oil majors. It competes with the likes of ExxonMobil, Chevron, and Total. It recently doubled down on the energy business with a $50 billion acquisition. But while it’s working to pay off the debt it took on to get that deal done, CEO Ben van Beurden made an interesting statement about the future that you may have missed in the numbers of Shell’s quarterly report.

What Shell looks like now

There’s no question about how Royal Dutch Shell makes money. It is one of the world’s largest oil and natural gas drillers, with a large footprint in liquified natural gas. Oil and gas have been the driving force, broadly speaking, throughout all of the company’s over 100-years of existence. Investor questions generally focus on what management is doing to support and grow its core operations.

In the first half of the year that included capital spending of roughly $11.5 billion. The goal for the year is for capital spending of between $25 and $30 billion. Right now management expects to be toward the low-end of that range. That range, meanwhile, is the goal every year from now until 2020. read more

Storm Harvey: Shell boss takes stock of disruption

Shell boss Ben Van Beurden says Storm Harvey is a “major event” for the industry and the firm’s staff in Texas.

Shell, which has its US base in the Texas city of Houston, has put some of its staff in emergency homes and closed two major facilities.

The storm, which earlier achieved hurricane status, has ripped through the US energy industry in the region.

However, Mr Van Beurden thinks the tropical storm will not have a major impact on its US oil production.

Large parts of Houston are under water, and more than 20 people are reported dead.

Thousands of people there have fled their homes in search of emergency shelter after record rainfall caused severe flooding.

The Shell chief executive said: “We’ve all seen the pictures. Many, many of our people – as with others as well – have been displaced… We’ve had to put people up in temporary accommodation.” read more

Shell lifts its first crude cargo from Libya in five years: industry sources

DUBAI (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell has lifted a cargo of 600,000 barrels of crude oil from Libya’s Zueitina port, its first from the war-torn north African country in 5 years, two industry sources told Reuters on Saturday.

“Libya is a significant resource holder and Shell International Trading and Shipping Company Ltd (STASCO) has a history marketing Libyan crudes,” a Shell spokesperson said.

“We welcome new business opportunities with Libya’s National Oil Corporation (NOC). However, we don’t comment on specific trading deals,” the spokesperson added. read more

Hints Shell is searching for life after oil

The management team wants the company to focus on long-term returns, which means investing in different types of projects.

Tyler Crowe: (TMFDirtyBird):Aug 17, 2017 Like so many other integrated oil and gas companies, Royal Dutch Shell‘s (NYSE:RDS-A) (NYSE:RDS-B) goal of the past several years was to preserve capital by any means possible in the short term without giving up too much of the future. Based on the company’s most recent earnings report, it has done a pretty good job of achieving that first goal. The second part? That is all up to what Shell’s management does from here.There were several hints on the company’s most recent conference call that suggest Shell has developed a new playbook that looks very different than its prior one. Here are quotes from that conference call that show Shell’s possible future.

Making the grade

Shell has been trying to pull off an elaborate corporate shift over the past couple of years. It wanted to absorb and integrate BG Group into Shell, unload about $30 billion in assets from the combined company to lower total debt levels, reduce operating costs and capital spending, and get back to generating enough cash to cover capital expenditures and dividends. To make this transformation even more challenging, it was trying to do it in a low oil price environment.

Based on the company’s most recent performance, it looks like management has pulled it off. Here’s CEO Ben van Beurden taking stock of the situation. read more

Can Western oil giants break the Gulf impasse?

HIROFUMI MATSUO, Nikkei senior staff writer

TOKYO — One after another, the top executives of Western oil majors have been stepping into the great Persian Gulf rift.

It has been more than two months since Saudi Arabia and other Arab states severed diplomatic ties with Qatar, and there are no signs of a thaw. But soon after the decision was made, a oil bosses began heading to Doha, the Qatari capital.

On June 14, just nine days after Qatar’s neighbors closed off their airspace and closed the sole land border, Royal Dutch Shell CEO Ben van Beurden met with Qatari Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani. Exxon Mobil CEO Darren Woods followed on June 24. Total CEO Patrick Pouyanne took his turn on July 11. read more

Royal Dutch Shell: If I Could Buy Just One Energy Stock

I’ve advocated CEO Ben van Beurden is the real deal. He’s a no-nonsense Dutchman with an eye for business simplification and efficiency; precisely what Shell needed.

: Aug. 11, 2017 9:55 AM ET

Summary

  • In 2017, most energy stocks have under performed.
  • Amidst the castaways, there’s a Super Major gem hiding in plain sight.
  • It’s a turnaround story wrapped in a 6.7% dividend yield.

Of all the companies I follow, one 2Q 2017 earnings release stood out. The company blew out Street estimates. Management continued to fulfill promises to investors. Remarkably, the stock resides in 2017’s most downtrodden neighborhood: Energy.

The company is Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A) (RDS.B).

For those that follow my work here on Seeking Alpha, I’ve been constructive on RDS shares for a long time. I’ve advocated CEO Ben van Beurden is the real deal. He’s a no-nonsense Dutchman with an eye for business simplification and efficiency; precisely what Shell needed. In 2014, Mr. van Beurden was elevated to the CEO role after an outstanding run at Shell Chemical. read more

Is Shell’s Lower Oil Forever Really So Unrealistic?

“Royal Dutch Shell PLC’s chief executive drew a collective gasp with his “lower forever” comment as one recent story put it.”  Funny, in 2012 when I said at an OPEC conference that the price was likely to return to the $50-60 range, it was not even taken seriously enough for gasps:  the moderator actually thought I was joking, and an oil company CEO replied, ‘Well, you hate to call someone an idiot’ apparently unaware I’ve been called much, much worse. read more

Rise of electric cars challenges the world’s thirst for oil

Rise of electric cars challenges the world’s thirst for oil

Proposed bans on petrol and diesel vehicles bring further pressure to bear on Big Oil

by: , Energy Editor: 8 Aug 2017

Ben van Beurden, chief executive of Royal Dutch Shell, made no attempt to disguise the challenge facing “Big Oil”. Companies must become more discriminating about which oilfields to develop, he said, with only the most low-cost and productive likely to remain competitive. “We have to have projects that are resilient in a world where demand has peaked and will be declining,” he said. “When will this happen? We do not know. But will it happen? We are certain.” FULL FT ARTICLE read more

Shell and BP’s commitment to North Sea oil ‘rock solid’

Shell and BP’s commitment to North Sea oil ‘rock solid’

Majors’ cost reductions have narrowed gap in competitiveness with other parts of world

Ben van Beurden, chief executive of Shell, has signalled that he too is once again viewing the North Sea as an investment opportunity, despite selling more than half of the group’s UK production to Chrysaor, a small UK company backed by US private equity funds, for up to $3.8bn in January. Last month, Mr van Beurden identified the Penguins field in the northern North Sea as among a handful of projects around the world that Shell would consider giving the green light to in the next 18 months. FULL FT ARTICLE

Warning of US sanctions ‘disaster’ for Russia energy projects

By: Henry Foy in Moscow and Andrew Ward in London

International energy investments in Russia will suffer from new US sanctions imposed on Moscow, executives have warned… A senior executive at a western oil group with a large presence in Russia told the Financial Times that the new sanctions “could be a disaster” given its current business in the country. Mr van Beurden said Shell had authorisation from Dutch authorities to press ahead with financing of Nord Stream 2, but was waiting to see how the US situation “evolves.” read more

Royal Dutch Shell Gearing Up To Stay ‘Fit For The Forties’

By Aisha Rahman: Jul. 31, 2017 6:49 PM ET

Summary

Q2 2017 saw better YoY profits. However, the same cannot be said for QoQ results, due to lower oil prices in Q2.

There were notable improvements in the cash flow position, and I expect this trend to continue on for the rest of the year.

As the company gears up to stay “resilient to market changes,” it is seeking to control its cost lines and step into the renewable energy business.

I had written an earnings preview on Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) a few days before the company posted its Q2 results for the year. I decided to do a spin-off article to that in response to their earnings announcement for the quarter, and talk about the tone the company has set for the rest of the year. read more

Shell plans 400 job cuts at Dutch projects and technology department

Royal Dutch Shell Plc plans to cut more than 400 jobs in the Netherlands, mainly at its major projects and energy technology operations, as the oil giant shifts its business model in response to lower oil prices, according to an internal document seen by Reuters.

The world’s second-largest oil company by market capitalization said in a statement responding to questions from Reuters that “approximately 400 (staff) are potentially at risk of redundancy during the last quarter of 2017/first half of 2018”. read more

Shell to cut 400 jobs in the Netherlands

Shell confirmed that it was restructuring its global projects and technology organisation and that about 400 people were at risk of redundancy.

The Anglo-Dutch energy group has already cut 13,000 jobs since the start of last year as it integrates former BG operations and looks to offload $30 billion of assets to pay down its debts from the acquisition.

Ben van Beurden, Shell’s chief executive, warned last week that costs needed to continue to fall as the company adopted a mindset of “lower for ever” oil prices. “We now have 13 per cent less employees than we did at the beginning of 2016. To be clear, costs must continue to go down, and stay down,” he said. read more

BP and Shell face huge challenge from switch to electric cars

Petrol pumps will become a thing of the past as charging points replace them: WEEGEE (ARTHUR FELLIG)/INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY/GETTY IMAGES

Emily Gosden, Energy Editor: 31 July 2017

Oil investors are getting worried. Electric cars have accelerated on to the front pages. Sales are surging, carmakers are unveiling plans for all-electric models and this week Britain vowed to ban sales of petrol and diesel cars by 2040.

Yet if Big Oil believes that death is about to pull up in a Tesla, it’s doing a good job of hiding it. On Thursday, Ben van Beurden, the boss of Royal Dutch Shell, welcomed Britain’s plans and declared that his next car would be electric. And earlier in the year Spencer Dale, BP’s chief economist, bluntly described the arrival of electric vehicles on the oil majors’ lawn as “not a game-changer”, adding that not even “enormous” growth in sales of such vehicles would make a big dent in global oil demand. read more

OPEC’s Existential Sucker Punch

Julian Lee: July 30, 2017 3:00 AM EDT

You wait decades for an existential crisis, then two come along at once. At least that’s how it must feel for OPEC’s beleaguered ministers. In the short term the market for their oil is being eroded by rising production outside their control. Looking further ahead, oil demand itself is under threat from the electrification of road transport. OPEC may not yet be dead, but its days are surely numbered.

The most obvious short-term threat to the group comes from the rapid rise in U.S. shale oil, but the risks have expanded to include other areas like Brazil’s prolific sub-salt discoveries and more recent finds further north along the east coast of South America. read more

The electric jolt that roused Big Oil

Jillian Ambrose: 

Identifying a tipping point is not always easy. But when one of the world’s most powerful oil bosses says he is in the market for an electric car, there can be little doubt.

Ben van Beurden, the Royal Dutch Shell boss, last week delivered the clearest indication yet that the burgeoning electric vehicle industry is already hastening the decline of global oil demand. “When that will be is not certain. But that it will happen, we are certain,” he told investors. read more

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