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Shell Says Yes To Free Cash Flow, No To Debt

Callum Turcan: Nov 15, 2017

Summary

  • Royal Dutch Shell generates free cash flow in Q3.
  • Outlook for Q4, even in light of impending capex increase, looks bright due to Brent rallying.
  • Over $10 billion in net debt reduction since the end of Q3 2016.
  • Overview of Q3 results and what to expect going forward.

Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) has come a long way since it bottomed out in early-2016. Its latest earnings report reinforced the notion that when Brent is trading in the $50s, Shell’s cash flow position becomes balanced. Cash flow neutrality is the key breakeven point for the industry in the current environment, as oil & gas giants need to show that they can cover capital expenditures and large dividends through organic means at realistic prices. Let’s check out how Royal Dutch Shell did in a low $50s Brent world, with an eye on organic cash inflows and outflows. read more

Woodside Falls Most in Year After Shell to Sell Stake

Shares falls as much as 3.5% in early Australia trading

Allan Gray Australia says it boosts stake in the LNG producer

Woodside Petroleum Ltd. fell the most in a year after Europe’s biggest oil company, Royal Dutch Shell Plc, said it would offloaded its entire holding in the Australian liquefied natural gas producer for $2.7 billion.

Woodside shares fell as much as 3.5 percent in intraday trading on Tuesday to A$31.10 ($23.74), and changed hands at A$31.19 at 11:51 a.m. in Sydney. Shell said it would sell an 8.5 percent stake in Woodside at A$31.10 a share, a 3.5 percent discount to Woodside’s closing price on Monday. The Anglo-Dutch company then expanded that sale overnight to exit its remaining 4.8 percent holding. read more

Shell to sell part of its Woodside Petroleum stake for $1.7 billion

Reuters Staff: NOVEMBER 13, 2017

LONDON/SYDNEY (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell is selling part of its stake in Australia’s largest independent oil and gas company, Woodside Petroleum Ltd, to equity investors for about $1.7 billion.

Shell, which has been slowly divesting its Woodside holding, said on Monday its Shell Energy Holdings Australia Limited (SEHAL) unit had struck a deal with two investment banks over the sale of 71.6 million Woodside shares for A$31.10 ($23.79) apiece. read more

Shell Prelude FLNG named as FieldComm Group 2017 Plant of the Year

06 November 2017

The Shell Prelude Floating Liquefied Natural Gas (FLNG) plant/ship of Royal Dutch Shell, which will be located in the Timor Sea off the North West coast of Australia, has been named as the FieldComm Group 2017 Plant of the Year.

This annual award is presented by FieldComm Group to recognise the people, companies and plant sites around the globe that are using the advanced capabilities of FOUNDATION FieldbusHART and WirelessHART technology in real-time applications for improved operations, maintenance, and asset productivity. This is the second award presented to a Shell facility, with the first being awarded in 2011 to Shell Scotford in Alberta, Canada.

Having recently completed the journey to its final destination, 200-km off the Australian mainland, it will be connected to Deepwater gas wells and is scheduled to begin regular operations in 2018. The 488m x 71m vessel’s 14 production facilities, rising eight stories above the deck will extract and process around 3.6 million tonnes per year of liquefied natural gas (LNG) during its 25-year lifespan. “FieldComm Group technologies are used in every phase of the Shell Prelude FLNG project and form the backbone of the intelligent predictive maintenance system,” said Kyle Dickson, control and automation engineer for Shell Prelude FLNG. “The use of device templates is delivering conformity and quality assurance throughout the commissioning process. This has enabled a small team to achieve impressive loop check rates while maintaining high levels of quality assurance. Once commissioned, equipment and unit modules will use the diagnostics and alerts provided by both HART and FOUNDATION Fieldbus technologies to great effect, specifically avoiding numerous plant trips and enabling unprecedented levels of remote support and deep-level diagnostics.” Rong Gul, senior automation engineer and subject matter expert (SME) for smart instrumentation and instrument asset management with Shell Global Solutions, reports that Prelude’s process applications employ more than 8,000 FOUNDATION Fieldbus devices, including 2,500 valve positioners, located on all control and monitoring devices, and connected only to the DCS; more than 4,500 HART devices connected to the DCS and PLCs via HART multiplexers, and used predominantly on devices connected to safety instrumented systems (SIS) and fire and gas (F&G) systems. WirelessHART is used on some specific applications. Use of the advanced diagnostics and rationalised device alerts has enabled predictive and targeted maintenance execution. Prelude is dependent on having a fully realised remote monitoring group of engineers advising on device issues. Commonly it has been possible to identify issues, specifically pertaining to control valves before a fault escalates and results in a plant upset or outage. While still in a start-up phase, Prelude is operating vast amounts of utility and marine systems, and the benefits of an intelligent instrument management system are already being realised.

At the peak of its recent commissioning efforts Prelude’s staff was performing more than 500 loop checks per week, and checking multiple streams of complex functions. The vessel’s utilities plant was also running 24/7, which made maintenance challenging. Thanks to using templates for its parameters, Prelude’s staff and contractors achieved total time-savings of 80% for device commissioning and loop checking across all devices using device templates; time savings for the valve positioner loop check procedure was more than 80% for the full loop test; tested all device types during the FAT (Factory Acceptance Test) in less than three days, compared to previous test using traditional methods, which took more than two days to test just three device types; and human error during FAT was quickly identified allowing for fast correction. read more

Royal Dutch Shell takes cashflow crown off Exxon Mobil

Royal Dutch Shell has taken Exxon Mobil’s cashflow crown, a year after completing the biggest deal in its history.

Europe’s largest energy company vaulted ahead on this closely watched indicator of financial health in the first nine months of 2017 as assets acquired from BG Group from Brazil to Australia churned out cash. For the year as a whole, Shell is on course to surpass its larger US rival on the measure for the first time in about two decades.

Shell generated $28.38 billion (€24.34bn) of cashflow from operations in the first nine months of the year, compared with $23.52 billion (€20.18bn) from Exxon. Chief executive Ben Van Beurden has already spelled out that his main long-term goal was overtaking Exxon to become the best-performing oil major. read more

Shell completes $4.4 billion in sales a day before earnings report

Dutch supermajor trying to dump $30 billion in assets in order to shape the company “into a world class investment.”

By Daniel J. Graeber  |  Nov. 1, 2017 at 6:17 AM

Nov. 1 (UPI) — Royal Dutch Shell said Wednesday it made further progress in a major divestment plan by completing the sale of assets in Gabon and in the North Sea.

For $628 million, Shell said it completed the sale of its entire Gabonese oil and gas interests to a company controlled by The Carlyle Group. The transaction includes the sale of all of Shell’s onshore oil and gas interests, which includes nine total fields, and the associated infrastructure, including pipelines and export terminals. read more

Gas producers pumping up demand

  • The Wall Street Journal

After spending hundreds of billions of dollars to transform themselves into global natural gas giants, some of the world’s biggest energy companies face a new challenge: generating more demand as supplies threaten to balloon and prices languish.

Companies including Royal Dutch Shell, Total and Cheniere Energy are trying to establish new markets for liquefied natural gas, a super-chilled version of the fuel that can be shipped around the world. Producers are promoting the use of LNG for industrial trucking and shipping. Companies also say they are considering building the power plants and infrastructure necessary to provide gas and electricity in developing markets such as South Africa and Vietnam. read more

Shell has seen the future – and it’s several shades of green

Ben Van Beurden, chief executive officer of Royal Dutch Shell, sees a future dominated by gas and renewables, with gas the clear winner. Photo: Bloomberg

By Ben Marlow: 

If there is one subject that divides energy producers it’s the question of when oil demand will peak.

Indeed, it is such a controversial topic that some senior figures like Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister, Khalid al-Falih, prefer not to discuss it at all.

He claims talk of peak demand is dangerous. It threatens to reduce vital investment, “compromising” energy security, al-Falih said earlier this year.

John Watson, boss of American oil giant Chevron, recently dismissed the idea of peak demand as “wishful thinking”. read more

Shell chief punctures myths surrounding gas exporters

 Business columnist, Melbourne: 10 Oct 2017

Shell Australia’s new chair, Zoe Yujnovich, has injected what for some will be an uncomfortable dose of reality into what has been a generally misleading debate about the role that the three big Queensland export LNG plants have played in the east coast energy crisis.

In an address to the national energy summit yesterday, Ms Yujnovich took issue with the widely accepted narrative that exports from the three plants off Gladstone have created a shortage of gas on the east coast and driven a spectacular surge in gas prices for households and manufacturers. read more

Chevron starts LNG output at Australia’s Wheatstone, first cargo expected in weeks

OCTOBER 9, 2017

* Wheatstone had been due to start shipping in mid-2017

* First cargo expected in “coming weeks”

* Wheatstone LNG will produce 8.9 million tpy at full capacity (Adds trader, Woodside comments, chart, factbox in related content section)

By Sonali Paul

MELBOURNE, Oct 9 (Reuters) – Chevron Corp said on Monday it has started producing liquefied natural gas (LNG) at its Wheatstone project in Australia, slightly later than expected, and plans to ship its first cargo soon. read more

Australia closing in on Qatar as world’s top LNG exporter

* Australia LNG exports tipped to rise to 74 mt in 2018-19

* Australia’s share of Japan, Korea LNG imports seen growing

* Iron ore price forecast raised to $64 for 2017

SYDNEY, Oct 6 (Reuters) – Australia expects to increase exports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) by 16 percent from mid-2018 as $180 billion in new projects hit their stride, nearly catching up with Qatar, the world’s top supplier.

Rising LNG exports coupled with higher prices for steel-making commodities and thermal coal should see Australia’s overall resource and energy export earnings increase 2 percent in the year to end-June 2018, to a record A$211 billion ($165 billion), the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science said on Friday. read more

400+ workers shut down LNG site, company warns for smoky flaring

5th Oct 2017 4:30 AM | Updated: 9:50 AM

by : 5th Oct 2017 4:30 AM

THEY say where there’s smoke there’s fire, but gas giant Shell is hopeful that won’t be the case when more than 400 workers don the orange and silver for QCLNG’s first shutdown.

The shut down work starts this Friday and is expected to cause increased flaring from the Curtis Island gas exporting site.

Shell wants a major change to its environmental conditions to allow for more smoky flaring, but the application is yet to be approved. read more

Shell’s Floating LNG Endeavor Is About To Begin

 Oct. 2, 2017 5:45 AM ET

Summary

  • Shell’s floating liquefied natural gas project, the Prelude FLNG venture, will come online within a year.
  • Cash flow generation expected to begin in 2018, two years later than initially planned.
  • Going over the details of Royal Dutch Shell’s Prelude FLNG development.

Royal Dutch Shell plc (NYSE:RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) is getting closer and closer to finally completing its Prelude FLNG project off the northwestern coast of Australia. FLNG stands for floating liquefied natural gas, a marine vessel that can commercialize gas finds that are too small to justify building a new onshore LNG facility to develop. Let’s dig in.

FLNG overview

The purpose of turning gaseous methane into liquid form is that LNG takes up 1/600th of the space as a liquid, making exports economically viable. By cooling the natural gas down to negative 260oF, Shell can economically supply gas to consumers all over the world. The real genius of FLNG vessels is the ability to fit a processing plant on a ship in a fraction of the space that conventional processing facilities take up, along with Shell’s Dual Mixed Refrigerant unit that can cool the gas down. read more

Australia Backs Down From Limiting Gas Exports

By Robb M. Stewart and Rob Taylor Features Dow Jones Newswires

MELBOURNE, Australia–Australia’s conservative government held back from imposing curbs on exports of liquefied natural gas after producers including Royal Dutch Shell PLC (RDSA.LN) agreed to put more gas into the domestic market to ease energy shortages on the east coast.

The decision, which followed a meeting between Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and energy companies, came just days after an Australian regulator warned that gas shortages in 2018 could be three times worse than previously thought. Experts had warned that the curbs risked damaging the country’s standing as a destination for investment, while having a limited impact on local gas supply and prices. read more

Australia PM Turnbull says gas companies agree to domestic supply deal

SEPTEMBER 27, 2017 / 5:32 AM

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said on Wednesday gas companies have agreed to a two-year domestic supply deal to plug a projected shortfall in the country’s east, preventing threatened government intervention in the export market.

The agreement heads off the possibility of Australia forcibly curbing exports from Australia’s three east coast gas exporters – Royal Dutch Shell, which runs Queensland Curtis LNG (QCLNG), Origin Energy, which runs the Australia Pacific LNG (APLNG) together with ConocoPhillips and Santos, which operates the Gladstone LNG plant. read more

Australian gas supply crunch squeezes east coast LNG exporters

UPDATE 2-Gas export curbs loom as Australia’s east faces gas shortfall

By Sonali Paul

MELBOURNE, Sept 25 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell, ConocoPhillips and Santos face curbs on exporting gas from Australia’s east coast in 2018 if they fail to plug a projected local supply shortfall, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull warned on Monday.

Eastern Australia faces a gas shortfall of up to 17 percent of market demand in 2018, the nation’s energy market operator and competition watchdog projected in reports submitted to the government on Monday that will be the basis for a decision by Nov. 1 on whether to limit exports. read more

Shell Expects Australia Gas Shortage to Trigger Export Restriction

The world’s second-biggest liquefied natural gas exporting nation will probably curb shipments next year to avoid a domestic shortfall of the fuel, according to the Australian head of Royal Dutch Shell Plc.

The Australian Energy Market Operator will probably declare a shortage for eastern states in the next two to four weeks, Shell Australia Chairwoman Zoe Yujnovich said at a Bloomberg event Wednesday in Sydney. That would trigger the country’s domestic gas security mechanism, a policy announced in June that could limit LNG exports from plants that draw more gas from local markets than they supply. read more

Shell Invests to Boost Global Gas Demand

Europe’s biggest energy company is investing in projects to boost global gas demand and aims to continue feeding the market it’s nurturing with new liquefied natural gas export plants.

Royal Dutch Shell Plc is supporting the development of gas use in heavy transport such as shipping and is also helping smaller and less credit worthy customers begin importing LNG, Maarten Wetselaar, the company’s director of integrated gas and new energies, said at an event at Bloomberg’s Sydney office Wednesday. As new LNG customers enter the market, that will open a window for Shell and others to develop new low-cost export plants. read more

What You Missed in Royal Dutch Shell plc’s Quarterly Report

Global energy giant Royal Dutch Shell hinted at how one number, over time, could change the future of the company

Reuben Gregg Brewer: (TMFReubenGBrewer): Sep 1, 2017 at 9:16AM Royal Dutch Shell plc (NYSE:RDS-A) (NYSE:RDS-B) is one of the world’s largest integrated oil majors. It competes with the likes of ExxonMobil, Chevron, and Total. It recently doubled down on the energy business with a $50 billion acquisition. But while it’s working to pay off the debt it took on to get that deal done, CEO Ben van Beurden made an interesting statement about the future that you may have missed in the numbers of Shell’s quarterly report.

What Shell looks like now

There’s no question about how Royal Dutch Shell makes money. It is one of the world’s largest oil and natural gas drillers, with a large footprint in liquified natural gas. Oil and gas have been the driving force, broadly speaking, throughout all of the company’s over 100-years of existence. Investor questions generally focus on what management is doing to support and grow its core operations.

In the first half of the year that included capital spending of roughly $11.5 billion. The goal for the year is for capital spending of between $25 and $30 billion. Right now management expects to be toward the low-end of that range. That range, meanwhile, is the goal every year from now until 2020. read more

Shell Joins Solar Push in Coal Country of World’s Top Exporter

Royal Dutch Shell Plc is investigating a solar power project in an Australian region better known for its fossil fuels, particularly coal.

The company is studying the feasibility of a solar development on its land in the Western Downs area of Queensland, which is subject to a final investment decision, a spokeswoman said by email. Though Shell’s statement didn’t elaborate on timing or size, the regional council this week said it had approved construction of the 250-megawatt Delga Solar Farm project proposed by Shell at Woleebee, near Wandoan. read more

Up to 800 possible jobs for solar farm which has been given green light

Up to 800 possible jobs for solar farm which has been given green light

POWER FROM THE SUN: An example of a large-scale solar farm.

The Delga Solar Farm will be the project of Shell Australia, subsidiary of multi-national oil giant Royal Dutch Shell.

THE Western Downs is keeping up its want to be Australia’s “energy capital” as it has approved the development application for the eighth solar farm project in the region yesterday morning.

The 250MW Delga Solar Farm will be built 25km south-west of Wandoan. This continues the prominence of Wandoan in the region, adding to the largest solar farm in Australia to be built in the area, as well as the approval for a new coal mine. read more

Australia’s $180 bln LNG megaproject boom enters final stretch

Australia’s $180 bln LNG megaproject boom enters final stretch

* Shell, Inpex race to tap gas in adjacent fields

* Ichthys LNG targets first output by March 2018

* Prelude FLNG seen starting between April and July

* Australia on course to 88 mln T/yr LNG export capacity

By Sonali Paul

MELBOURNE, Aug 14 (Reuters) – The last massive component of Australia’s $180 billion liquefied natural gas construction boom arrived on Monday, stepping up a race between Anglo-Dutch giant Shell and Japan’s Inpex to start chilling gas for export in 2018.

Company reputations are at stake, as well as first access to overlapping gas fields and Australia leapfrogging Qatar as the world’s largest exporter of LNG.

The Ichthys Venturer, a floating production, storage and offloading facility, travelled 5,600 km (3,500 miles) from a South Korean shipyard and will be moored 220 km off Western Australia to handle condensate from the Ichthys field. read more

The Secret Behind Better Oil Major Earnings

By Gregory Brew – Aug 02, 2017, 6:00 PM CDT

After several years of austerity and belt-tightening, the major international oil companies posted substantial profits in Q2 of 2017. The five largest private oil companies together generated more than $30 billion in profit, an indication that most have successfully adapted to the current bout of low prices, while a few have publicly indicated their belief that prices will hover around $50 for the foreseeable future.

What this means is that the “mega projects” that dominated many companies’ balance sheets for the last decade will become increasingly rare, as the majors pivot towards short-term, low-risk ventures with a faster turnaround. A closer look at each company shows how individual firms have adapted in distinct ways to this new era. read more

LNG possibility lives on, even after death of Pacific NorthWest LNG

And two other large global energy players with regulatory approval from the B.C. and Canadian governments say they are trying to position themselves to be ready to make a decision on building their own billions-of-dollars of mega-projects in northwest B.C. to coincide with increased demand they forecast could kick in by the middle of next decade. Those projects are LNG Canada led by Royal Dutch Shell plc and Kitimat LNG, a 50-50 venture of Chevron and Australian-based Woodside Energy. read more

Cheap oil forcing a rethink, says Royal Dutch Shell

  • The Wall Street Journal

Royal Dutch Shell has presented a pessimistic vision for the future of oil, even as the company reported success in generating cash during a prolonged energy downturn.

Shell has cut costs and said it was preparing for a world in which crude prices might never regain precrash levels and petroleum demand declined.

Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden said the company had a mindset that oil prices would remain “lower forever” .

“We have to have projects that are resilient in a world where oil has peaked,” Mr van Beurden told reporters on a conference call discussing the company’s second-quarter financial results. “When it will happen we don’t know, but that it will happen we are certain.” read more

Shell backs gas export limits

: Resources reporter, Melbourne: 28 July 2017

Royal Dutch Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden has said he is very supportive of Malcolm Turnbull’s moves to impose export restrictions to increase domestic supply on the east coast, where Shell runs the Queensland Curtis LNG project.

But the oil major has revealed there have been some unspecified operational problems at QCLNG, which exports coal-seam gas from Gladstone.

Speaking on a second-quarter earnings call in London last night, Mr Van Beurden backed the Prime Minister’s intervention in the markets, which gives the government the power to restrict exports from any LNG project that is not a “net contributor” to domestic markets. read more

Shell nears finishing line with $30billion divestment programme

Shell nears finishing line with $30billion divestment programme

Shell has completed more than 80% of its $30billion divestment programme.

Written by

The supermajor announced this morning that it had shed assets worth $25billion as part of the reshaping of its portfolio.

This included the landmark North Sea deal with Chrysaor earlier this year, worth around $3.8billion.

It also comes following the $68.2billion merger with BG Group.

The supermajor also recently agreed to sell its stake in Irish gas project Corrib in a deal worth up to 1.23 billion US dollars (£956 million).

The firm said adjusted earnings rose from 1.05 billion US dollars (£800 million) to 3.6 billion US dollars (£2.7 billion), an increase of 245%. read more

Report: Gas could be sidelined by renewables in parts of Australia

Royal Dutch Shell, meanwhile, announced its Prelude vessel, a first-of-a-kind ship designed to process LNG off the coast of Western Australia, arrived at its destination after leaving a South Korean shipyard in June. With LNG emerging in market share because of its diverse deliverability options, Shell said the Prelude floating LNG vessel opens up new export opportunities.

By Daniel J. Graeber: 26 July 2017

July 26 (UPI) — With Australia monitoring natural gas demand, a consultant group found gas-fired power could get squeezed out in parts of the country as renewables get cheaper.

A research project from Wood Mackenzie, in coordination with GTM Research, found that wind, solar and battery costs might decline enough to the point that, by 2025, they’re competitive with gas-powered plants. For batteries in particular, whose costs are expected to decline by as much as 50 percent over the next decade, the researchers found storage capacity will be enough to meet the region’s peak residual demand. read more

In Australia, Shell signals new era for LNG

In Australia, Shell signals new era for LNG

By Daniel J. Graeber: July 25, 2017

July 25 (UPI) — The arrival of a floating liquefied natural gas facility off the coast of Australia signals a milestone for the region as an energy hub, Royal Dutch Shell said.

The company’s Prelude vessel, its first-ever floating platform for LNG, arrived off the coast of Western Australia, after leaving its South Korean shipyard in late June.

Large for a floating facility, it’s one-quarter the size of an equivalent inland plant. With LNG emerging in market share because of its diverse deliverability options, Shell said the Prelude FLNG vessel opens up new doors in new countries. read more

Shell’s Prelude FLNG vessel reaches gas field site in Australian waters

EBR Staff WriterPublished 25 July 2017

Royal Dutch Shell’s Australian subsidiary has confirmed the arrival of the Prelude floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) facility in Australian waters from South Korea.

The 488m-long FLNG facility began its journey from the Samsung Heavy Industries (SHI) shipyard in Geoje to Australia in late June to reach the offshore Prelude gas field, located about 475km north-north east of Broome in Western Australia.

According to Shell Australia, the floating facility will extract and liquefy gas from the Prelude gas field prior to its export to the company’s customers around the world. read more

Shell, SoftBank Weigh Bids for Asia Renewables Firm Worth Up to $5 Bln – Sources

SINGAPORE — Royal Dutch Shell and SoftBank are among several global groups considering bidding for Equis Energy, Asia’s largest independent renewable energy producer valued at up to $5 billion (3.84 billion pounds), sources familiar with the matter said.

Japanese trading companies, global pension funds and buyout firms are also in the fray to buy Singapore-based Equis, the sources said, at a time when many Asian governments are expanding the use of renewable power and its costs are falling. read more

Prelude

Shell Mulls LNG-Hub Network as Use by Ships and Trucks Expands

By Rakteem Katakey: July 11, 2017

(Bloomberg) — Royal Dutch Shell Plc, the oil company that spent more than $50 billion to buy natural-gas producer BG Group Plc, is looking to expand demand for the fuel in transport to ensure its output is consumed.

Shell is studying developing a global network of liquefied natural gas supply hubs for vehicles including ships, Steve Hill, executive vice president for gas and energy marketing and trading, said Monday at the World Petroleum Congress in Istanbul. read more

Qatar signals LNG price war for market share in Asia

U.S. and European oil majors such as Royal Dutch Shell and Chevron have invested huge sums over the last decade – often more than they have spent on oil – in an attempt to dominate the LNG market, especially through mega-projects in Australia such as Chevron’s Gorgon or Shell’s Prelude.

By Henning Gloystein and Mark Tay | SINGAPORE

Qatar’s plan to boost liquefied natural gas (LNG) output by 30 percent is the opening shot in a price war for customers in Asia pitting the Gulf state against competitors from the United States, Russia and Australia.

Qatar, facing regional isolation in a diplomatic dispute with its Gulf neighbors, took energy markets by surprise on Tuesday when it said it would raise its LNG production to 100 million tonnes per year – equivalent to a third of current global supplies – within the next five to seven years. read more

Jaw-dropping numbers behind the Shell Prelude, as the world’s biggest boat sails towards WA

Staff on board the Prelude.Picture: Shell Australia

Peter Milne: Sunday, 2 July 2017

Containing as much steel as 36 Eiffel Towers and spanning three times the length of the oval at Perth Stadium, Shell’s Prelude floating LNG facility will cut an imposing figure even in the vastness of the open seas between Asia and Australia.

The world’s biggest vessel was last night continuing on it journey from South Korea to its new home, 475km north-east of Broome.

It’s jaw-dropping scale presented more than a few headaches for engineers but the main difficulty was not accommodating the vessel’s girth, it was dealing with how close its crew would be to the millions of tonnes of gas that Prelude would process. read more

Shell’s floating LNG facility sets sail from South Korea for Australia

Royal Dutch Shell’s Prelude floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) ship has left a shipyard in South Korea for its destination offshore northwest Australia, the company said on Thursday.

Shell’s $12.6 billion Prelude project is expected to start operating next year, the company said, after long delays since the oil major first decided to go ahead with the project in 2011.

Once the facility arrives in Australia, it will be secured to the seabed by mooring chains before it can be connected to the gas field and start operating, Shell said. read more

Shell finally sets the Prelude, largest floating gas facility ever built, on course to waters off WA coast

By Babs McHugh: 30 June 2017

The largest floating natural gas facility ever built has left Korea bound for waters off the north west of Western Australia.

The Prelude is the first floating liquified natural gas (FLNG) facility commissioned by Royal Dutch Shell, and it means the company will not have to pipe gas onshore for processing.

All extraction, refining, production and offloading of the LNG will be undertaken on the vessel, which will be moored over the Browse Basin, 475 kilometres off the coast of Broome. read more

Shell’s Floating LNG Facility Sets Sail From South Korea for Australia

LONDON — Royal Dutch Shell’s Prelude floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) ship has left a shipyard in South Korea for its destination offshore northwest Australia, the company said on Thursday.

Shell’s $12.6 billion (9.72 billion pounds) Prelude project is expected to start operating next year, the company said, after long delays since the oil major first decided to go ahead with the project in 2011.

Once the facility arrives in Australia, it will be secured to the seabed by mooring chains before it can be connected to the gas field and start operating, Shell said. read more

Shell’s Prelude LNG vessel sets sail

The world’s biggest vessel – Shell’s Prelude floating LNG platform – has left the South Korean port where it was built, bound for waters off the North West.

Tug boats began towing the 488m Prelude out to sea early this morning from Samsung Heavy Industry’s Geoje shipyard, according to a website monitoring vessel movements.

Prelude was being towed by Terasea Hawk, Tereasea Falcon and Terasea Osprey, the MarineTraffic website showed.

The facility will be deployed off the North West coast to extract and process gas from the Prelude and Concerto gas fields. read more

Gas crisis lures Shell to energy trading

by Matthew Stevens: 28 June 2017

Royal Dutch Shell has established a new energy trading business in Australia and has already started work on mitigating the growing political risk of supply-side failure in the liquid natural gas drained east coast gas market.

Shell Energy Australia recently signed its first gas supply contract with a Victorian customer and the plan is to trade actively in Australia’s domestic gas and electricity markets.

The immediate plan is that traders based in Melbourne and Brisbane will bypass existing market structures to deliver gas and electricity to, initially at least, commercial customers up and down the east coast. read more

Shell keeps exploration and production focus in Australia

John Culbertson: May 31, 2017

May 31 (UPI) — Royal Dutch Shell said Wednesday it was keeping its exploration and production portfolio in place in Australia, but stepping back from its aviation business.

Shell’s aviation subsidiary in Australia sold to independent Viva Energy Australia for $250 million in line with the Dutch supermajor’s efforts to streamline its portfolio. Shell keeps its brand name visible in the aviation refueling sector as Viva Energy remains the licensee of its fuels.

“Shell’s upstream operations in Australia, which include exploration, production and gas commercialization, are not impacted by this announcement,” the company stated. read more

Shell says completes sale of Australian aviation business for $250 mln

May 31 Shell

Has completed sale of its Australian Aviation Business to Viva Energy Australia for a total transaction value of approximately $250 million.

Further company coverage: (Bengaluru Newsroom: +91 80 6749 1136)

SOURCE

Shell to sell NZ energy assets

By  and : 31 May 2017

Australian oil and gas companies that end up missing out on Origin Energy’s Lattice Energy portfolio may soon turn their attention across the Tasman, where energy giant Shell has kicked off a sales process for its New Zealand business that could be worth as much as $1 billion.

Investment bank JPMorgan has been working on a sale for the global oil company for some time, but flyer documents were finally released to prospective suitors this month. read more

Shell’s $390m asset write-off casts doubt on CSG reserves

: Resources reporter: Melbourne: 2 MAY 2017

Shell has written off $390 million worth of newly acquired coal-seam and other gas exploration and evaluation ground associated with the Queensland Curtis LNG plant at Gladstone because of poor drilling and testing results.

Raising more questions over long-term production from Queensland coal-seam gas fields that are supposed to feed Gladstone’s three gas-hungry LNG plants for the next 20 years, the writedowns were revealed as part of $1.2 billion of impairments logged this month in local accounts for Shell’s Queensland subsidiaries. read more

‘Very impressive’ first quarter results predicted for BP, Shell

‘Very impressive’ first quarter results predicted for BP, Shell

An analyst has said “the numbers are going to look very impressive” for oil majors Shell and BP when they publish their first quarter results this week.

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Iain Armstrong, divisional director at Brewin Dolphin, said most companies could look forward to good year-on-year comparisons, considering the depths oil prices plunged to during the same quarter last year.

Brent crude slipped to below $30 at the start of 2016, having been above $110 in mid-2014.

Shell suffered pre-tax losses of $642million in the first quarter of 2016, while BP recorded pre-tax losses totalling $865million. Both firms achieved multi-billion dollar profits a year earlier. read more

Arrow Energy wins Australian gas pipeline license, but plan on hold

MELBOURNE, May 1 (Reuters) – Arrow Energy, owned by Royal Dutch Shell <RDSa.L> and PetroChina <601857.SS>, has been granted a license to build a natural gas pipeline in Australia’s Queensland state that could contribute to easing the country’s gas supply crunch.

Queensland issued the pipeline license last Friday, a spokesman for the state’s Department of Natural Resources and Mines said on Monday.

The 420-km (260-mile) pipeline is designed to carry gas from a coal seam gas project in Queensland’sBowen Basin to the Gladstone area. There has been no final decision yet on the pipeline because the coal seam project has not been developed. read more

Fibre, wi-fi keep most Shell Prelude staff onshore

By Ry Crozier Apr 24, 2017

Implementing a subsea fibre optic link to underpin automation and remote monitoring aboard Shell Australia’s forthcoming Prelude floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) platform means it will only need to fly people out to the plant “by exception”.

The Prelude project is being closely watched by the LNG sector as a potential model for future gas extraction from increasingly remote offshore fields.

Prelude’s operations will be monitored remotely from Shell Australia’s collaborative work environment (CWE) in Perth, which acts as the company’s main operations centre. read more

Support grows for Australian cross-continent pipeline to combat gas shortages

Apr. 19, 2017 12:42 PM ET|By: , SA News Editor

Australia’s government may support construction of a 1K-mile gas pipeline likely to cost more than A$5B (US$3.8B), WSJ reports, amid growing concern about shortages of liquefied natural gas and blackouts on the country’s populous eastern seaboard.

Two senior ministers expressed support for a transcontinental pipeline as Prime Minister Turnbull met with major LNG exporters including Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B), Exxon Mobil (NYSE:XOM) and Santos (OTCPK:STOSF) to discuss ways of getting more LNG into the domestic energy market. read more

The end is nigh for Shell in New Zealand

  • The Wall Street Journal

Royal Dutch Shell has taken a step towards an exit from its New Zealand assets with a deal to sell its 50 per cent stake in a natural-gas field to local venture partner Todd Energy.

The agreement will also see Shell take full control of a joint-venture company that operates two further gas ventures in New Zealand, simplifying Shell’s operating structure as it looks to offload the assets. Financial terms weren’t disclosed.

The sale of its stake in the Kap­uni field in New Zealand’s Taranaki region to Todd Energy follows a review of operations in the country that Shell announced in December 2015 as part of ­efforts to refocus its natural-gas and deepwater oil businesses following a slump in oil prices. read more

Shell agrees gas supply deals in Australia

By Robb M. Stewart: Published: Apr 6, 2017 2:20 a.m. ET

MELBOURNE, Australia–Under pressure to ensure industry in Australia isn’t hit with a shortfall of natural gas, Royal Dutch Shell PLC (RDSA) said it had agreed short-term sales deals with a power supplier and a maker of explosives.

The energy company is reducing exports of gas from its QGC operation in tropical Queensland in order to supply additional gas to the domestic market this year, said Zoe Yujnovich, the recently appointed chairwoman of Shell’s Australian business. read more

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