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Shell Signs Agreement for biofuel technology

CALGARY, June 27, 2017 /CNW/ – Royal Dutch Shell plc, through its subsidiary Shell International Exploration and Production B.V. (“Shell”), and SBI BioEnergy Inc. have reached an agreement granting Shell exclusive development and licensing rights for SBI’s biofuel technology. Edmonton-based SBI has a patented process that can convert a wide range of waste oils, greases and sustainable vegetable oils into lower carbon drop-ins for diesel, jet fuel and gasoline. Under the agreement, Shell and SBI will work together to demonstrate the potential of the technology and, if successful, scale up for commercial application.

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Shell in clean energy race

It wants to be leader in the business and establish itself across full value chain of renewables, alternative energies

Royal Dutch Shell aims to be a leader in clean energy and sees an opportunity in using its global presence and established brand to scale up the new energies business quickly as and when. PHOTO: REUTERS

ROYAL Dutch Shell aims to be a leader in clean energy and sees an opportunity in using its global presence and established brand to scale up the new energies business quickly as and when.

The second largest-publicly traded oil company in the world also plans on establishing itself across the full value chain of renewables and alternative energies as it has done for oil, said a senior executive in the firm.

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Exxon, BP and Shell back carbon tax proposal to curb emissions

Exxon, BP and Shell back carbon tax proposal to curb emissions

Oliver Milman: Tuesday 20 June 2017

In a full-page newspaper ad on Tuesday, the companies called for a “consensus climate solution that bridges partisan divides, strengthens our economy and protects our shared environment”. Exxon and the others were listed as founding members of the plan… “ExxonMobil will try to dress this up as climate activism, but its key agenda is protecting executives from legal accountability for climate pollution and fraud,” said Naomi Ages, senior climate campaigner at Greenpeace USA. “A nicely worded public relations exercise is no cure for decades of deception.”

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OEMs join with Shell and Bosch to launch ‘FindAdBlue’

By | 15 June 2017

Several car manufacturers are working with Bosch and Shell, together with Integer Research Ltd, to launch a website – www.FindAdBlue.com – designed to help diesel engine drivers to find gas stations with AdBlue pumps.

The FindAdBlue partners are Audi, Bosch, Mercedes-Benz, Opel, Shell and Volkswagen. AdBlue is a vital ingredient in SCR technology  – applied to most Euro 6 compliant diesel engines – that can help counter the suggestion that the latest diesel engines produce vast quantities of harmful emissions.

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Shell Sees Ability to Manage Risk Giving Edge in Offshore Wind

Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Europe’s most valuable oil company, expects its expertise in managing risk will make it a market leader in developing the clean-energy industry.

Offshore wind projects are attracting billions of dollars of investment and will become “the energy backbone” for European countries from Germany to the U.K., said Mark Gainsborough, Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s head of new energies. 

Oil companies have a natural advantage in that business, since they have spent decades learning how to manage financial, political and project-development risks, he said. That gives them an edge over renewable energy developers, who prefer to pin down long-term power-purchase agreements or government support before moving forward. As the renewables industry shifts to more subsidy-free projects, it may be the established oil companies that can handle the gambles that come with competing at market prices.

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After oilsands divestments, Shell Canada refocuses on gas, chemicals and renewables

Geoffrey Morgan | June 6, 2017 4:27 PM ET
More from Geoffrey Morgan | @geoffreymorgan

Shell Canada President & Country Chair Michael Crothers during an interview in Calgary, Alberta: Photograph by Todd Korol for National Post

CALGARY – Shell Canada Ltd. will soon announce a project to turn vegetable products into diesel fuel in Alberta, as part of the company’s transition to produce less oil and more energy from natural gas, renewables and chemicals.

This follows Shell’s massive US$7.25-billion divestment of its oilsands assets, announced March 9. The company still plans to build an LNG terminal in British Colombia, but no timeline has been set.

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Shell still working to reduce emissions despite U.S. pullout from Paris agreement

President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of the Paris climate agreement Thursday, but one of the largest companies in the world said it will still do its part to provide clean energy.

Shell Chemicals, which is building a $6 billion ethane cracker plant along the Ohio River in Potter Township, said Thursday that the company’s “position on climate change and the importance of the Paris agreement is well known.”

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Shell’s Make the Future Live attracts 30,000

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Shell’s Make the Future Live took place at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford, London from Thursday to Sunday.

The four-day extravaganza featured a number of inspiring and thoughtprovoking exhibits on the future of energy and how the world will have to move away from fossil fuels for energy in the future.

Some famous faces were also in attendance. Jason Bradbury from the Gadget Show and comedian Richard Ayoade hosted a podcast asking if London can become the world’s first carbon neutral city by 2050.

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Royal Dutch Shell develops smart charging for electric cars to prevent blackouts

Shell plans to install ten rapid-charging points for electric vehicles on its British petrol station forecourts this year: SHELL

Royal Dutch Shell is stepping up its drive into the electric vehicle market by developing smart charging technology to prevent battery-powered cars causing blackouts.

The oil major said it had tested the service, which intelligently controls when cars draw electricity from the grid, in London, Hamburg and San Diego, and was drawing up plans for its commercial deployment.

An increasing number of companies are looking at the issue because of concerns that power grids cannot cope with the demand from even modest numbers of electric vehicles charging at the same time.

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Shell shareholders reject emissions target proposal

By Karolin Schaps | THE HAGUE

Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) shareholders on Tuesday widely rejected a proposal by an environmental group calling for the oil company to set and publish annual targets to reduce carbon emissions.

The vote is a setback for climate activists who are increasing pressure on global oil companies, including U.S. firms Exxon Mobil (XOM.N) and Chevron (CVX.N), to become more ambitious in helping combat climate change.

Around 94 percent of Shell shareholders who cast a vote decided against resolution 21, according to final results reported following the company’s annual general meeting (AGM) in The Hague. Roughly 5 percent of voters abstained.

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Shareholders criticise Shell over climate change commitments

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Royal Dutch Shell has been rapped over its climate change commitments, with shareholders criticising its rejection of emissions targets that would bring it in line with the Paris climate accord.

Shareholders at the oil giant’s annual general meeting (AGM) at The Hague spent hours questioning Shell’s board members, who said that while the company supported the Paris agreement, setting company targets was “not in the best interest of the company”.

Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden said his company was making progress in lowering its emissions, but that achieving Paris Climate Agreement goals – which aim to limit global warming to below 2 degrees Celsius from pre-industrial levels – would require broader coordination, including active government support.

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Shell CEO says climate change is real, but energy demand growth is ‘unstoppable’

The threat of climate change is real and action is needed, says Ben van Beurden, the chief executive of Royal Dutch Shell.

Ben van Beurden also touched on the oil giant’s transformation, millennials, the new Trump administration and more in a May 17 interview with The Washington Post.

It’s been a turbulent couple of years for the Shell chief executive. With the roller coaster in crude oil prices, the company’s stock has lurched from a high of $83.12 a share six months after he took charge to a low of $36.87 a share. The stock has climbed back, but revenues have plunged by a third since 2013. The shareholders’ annual meeting is Tuesday at The Hague.

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SHELL CEO WARNS TRUMP AGAINST BREAKING PARIS CLIMATE DEAL

By Janene Pieters on May 22, 2017 – 11:05

American companies will face detrimental consequences if U.S. president Donald Trump decides to withdraw his country from the Paris climate agreement, Shell CEO Ben van Beurden warned in an interview with British newspaper Financial Times. Van Beurden is one of the first to criticize Trump’s decisions from the business community, which is set to benefit from Trump’s promises of tax cuts and relaxed rules, RTL Nieuws reports.

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A Look at the Gas Stations of Tomorrow

A concept Shell station has a restaurant and collection spot for online shoppers (left), deli (right), solar panels to help power the station, blue-topped chargers and fueling points for electric and hydrogen vehicles—and, yes, gas pumps at back right. PHOTO: SHELL

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Investors Demand Details On Shell’s Emission-Driven Bonus Pay

By Tsvetana Paraskova – May 17, 2017, 1:24 PM CDT

In March this year, Shell said that it is proposing a Directors’ Remuneration Policy, subject to shareholder approval at the 2017 Annual General Meeting (AGM) on May 23, 2017. The policy, if approved by shareholders, will be effective until the 2020 AGM, unless shareholders approve other policies in the meantime.

The proposed remuneration policy for executives includes, among other things, new metrics for greenhouse gas (GHG) management, and these now form 10 percent of the annual bonus scorecard, Shell said.

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Oil and Mining Giants Detail Road Map to Reduce Carbon by Half

by Mark Chediak: 25 April 2017, 05:01 BST

A group of companies and non-profit agencies that includes energy giants Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BHP Billiton said global greenhouse gas emissions could be cut in half by 2040 without impeding economic development, in part by converting grids to use mostly renewable power.

The declining costs of wind, solar and batteries will make it possible within 15 years to build power networks that get as much as 90 percent of their power from renewable sources while providing electricity at a cost that’s competitive with fossil-fuels, according to a report released Tuesday by the Energy Transitions Commission, a group of energy companies, investors and non-profit organizations including the Rocky Mountain Institute.

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Why Big Oil wants Trump to stay in Paris climate deal

  @mattmegan5 April 18, 2017: 12:27 PM ET

President Trump could deal the landmark Paris climate agreement a massive blow this week.

The U.S. president is huddling with advisers on Tuesday to explore whether he should yank America from the international accord aimed at slowing global warming.

But some powerful forces — with real skin in the game — are urging Trump not to abandon the 2015 Paris deal brokered among more than 175 nations.

Surprisingly, it’s the big oil companies who are vocally supporting the climate agreement, joining others in the administration that include Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Ivanka Trump and her husband Jared Kushner.

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Exxon and Shell Join Ivanka Trump to Defend Paris Climate Accord

by Jennifer A Dlouhy 17 April 2017, 19:30 BST

As President Donald Trump contemplates whether to make good on his campaign promise to yank the United States out of the Paris climate accord, an unlikely lobbying force is hoping to talk him out of it: oil and coal producers.

A pro-Paris bloc within the administration has recruited energy companies to lend their support ahead of a high-level White House meeting Tuesday to discuss the global pact to curtail greenhouse-gas emissions, according to two people familiar with the effort who asked not to be identified.

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Shell wants Dutch government to target 20 GW in offshore wind by 2030

Apr. 13, 2017 8:25 AM ETBy: , SA News Editor

Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) says it has urged the Dutch government to come up with bolder offshore wind targets and quadruple the goal for installed capacity to 20 GW by 2030.

Shell, which has traditionally invested little in green energy sources, is ramping up renewable energy investments to $1B/year by the end of the decade after pressure from shareholders.

Some of the company’s recent activities in renewable energy include winning a contract leading a consortium to build a wind farm off the coast of the Netherlands and bidding for an offshore wind license in the U.S.

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Shell claims low-carbon edge

On Monday, reports surfaced that some of Shell’s money circulating in Nigeria was used for payoffs.

April 12 (UPI) — One of the largest oil companies in the world, Royal Dutch Shell said Wednesday it was focused on a low-carbon strategy that was geared toward long-term growth.

Shell highlighted its movement through a changing energy landscape in a sustainability report on activities last year. Chief Executive Officer Ben van Buerden said in the report that lower crude oil prices and a global community coordinated around the U.N.-backed Paris climate agreement meant changes were necessary for the oil and gas business.

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Royal Dutch Shell’s CEO Ben van Beurden hails “significant steps” taken to tackle climate change

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The hailed the progress made in recent years, such as the Paris Agreement, as marking a worldwide change in attitude in moving towards a low carbon economy.

In the opening remarks of the supermajor’s sustainability report for 2016, he describes how Shell is working to help meet the world’s growing demand for more and cleaner energy.

In his introduction, van Beurden said: “In 2016, the world took significant steps towards building a low-carbon energy future. The United Nations (UN) Paris Agreement and the UN’s sustainable development goals came into force, setting new targets for tackling climate change, promoting sustainable economic growth and providing access to modern energy.

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Trump’s climate change executive order won’t change coal’s fortunes, Shell chair says

 : 30 March 2017

President Donald Trump‘s effort to roll back Obama-era climate change policies will not do much to improve demand for coal at America’s power plants, Royal Dutch Shell Chairman Chad Holliday said Thursday.

Coal’s use in U.S. power plants has been falling for years in the face of stiff competition from natural gas. Former President Barack Obama‘s initiatives to rein in the impacts of climate change have hastened the retirement of old, inefficient coal-fired plants and the switch to cleaner-burning natural gas.

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Why Are Shell And Toyota Backing Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles?

Royal Dutch Shell sees that facing a lower-carbon transport future will need a “mosaic of fuels and engines,” but the energy conglomerate is leaning toward hydrogen as the alternative fuel of choice.

Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are classified globally as zero emission vehicles, and are seeing a wave of policy support in North America, Europe, and Asia. The water vapor emissions are fascinating to many. Shell sees a distinct place for itself in supporting the vehicles and leading development of the fueling infrastructure needed for mass adoption.

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Shell adds hundreds of jobs in new unit focusing on alternative energy

LeAnne Graves

SINGAPORE // Shell has added hundreds of jobs to its New Energies division as it plans to expand further in alternative fuels, wind and solar, a company executive said.

The oil and gas giant created a new division last year that focuses on investing in hydrogen, biofuels, solar and wind. Mark Gainsborough, Shell’s executive vice president of new energies, said the division’s workforce has expanded to more than 200 staff as the company looks to invest in excess of US$1billion per year by 2020.

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The fossil fuel industry’s invisible colonization of academia

Benjamin Franta and Geoffrey SupranMonday 13 March 2017 

The event’s sponsor was Shell Oil Company. The producer of the film series was Shell. The film’s director is Vice President of a family-owned oil and gas company, and has taken approximately $300,000 from Shell. The host, Harvard Kennedy School, has received at least $3.75 million from Shell. And the event’s panel included a Shell Executive Vice President.

FULL ARTICLE

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Shell CEO’s plan for a smaller carbon footprint

Patti Domm: 9 March 2017

Royal Dutch Shell‘s announcement of the sale of $7.25 billion in Canadian oil sands assets Thursday is an important step to turning itself into a company of the future — with a broader mix of energy assets and a smaller carbon footprint.

Shell CEO Ben van Beurden said the company is committed to reshaping itself and believes that renewables and new energy will play a bigger role. The company is retaining just 10 percent of its Canadian sands assets.

“We are right in the middle of transforming the company into the company of the future,” he said at the CERAWeek conference in Houston, sponsored by IHS Markit.

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Shell CEO urges switch to clean energy as plans hefty renewable spending

The oil and gas industry risks losing public support if progress is not made in the transition to cleaner energy, Royal Dutch Shell Plc (RDSa.L) Chief Executive Ben van Beurden said on Thursday.

The world’s second largest publicly-traded oil company plans to increase its investment in renewable energy to $1 billion a year by the end of the decade, van Beurden said, although it is still a small part of its total annual spending of $25 billion.

The CEO said that the transition to a low carbon energy system will take decades and government policies including putting a price on carbon emissions will be essential to phase out the most polluting sources of energy such as coal and oil.

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Shell cuts debt with US$7.25 billion sale of Canada oil sands

9 March 2017

TORONTO (BLOOMBERG) – Royal Dutch Shell will sell almost all its production assets in Canada’s oil sands in a US$7.25 billion (S$10.24 billion) deal that cuts debt and reduces involvement in one of the most environmentally damaging forms of fossil-fuel extraction.

The company will sell all of its oil-sands interests apart from a 10 per cent stake in the Athabasca Oil Sands mining project, The Hague-based Shell said on Thursday (March 9). It will also continue as operator of the Scotford upgrader and Quest carbon capture and storage project.

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Shell and Exxon Knew, Norway Knows Too

GREENPEACE: Activists protesting Shell.

Norway has made billions from fossil fuels. Our US$900 billion Sovereign Wealth Fund – the world’s largest – has been harvested from nearly two decades of careful management of its oil wealth. But it’s time for Norway to turn its back on its oil-fuelled past, and embrace a different future.

On 28 February, the fund’s manager published data showing it had increased its holdings in oil majors during 2016 – companies including Shell, Exxon and the tar sands company Suncor.

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Shell Oil accused of ignoring climate threat known in 1991

By Valerie Richardson – The Washington Times – Thursday, March 2, 2017

The #ExxonKnew campaign never quite panned out as climate change activists had hoped, unless their goal was to see Exxon Mobil CEO Rex W. Tillerson sworn in as secretary of state. But that failure wasn’t enough to stop #ShellKnew.

Shell Oil came under fire this week from environmentalists after a Dutch blogger unearthed a 1991 video, “Climate of Concern,” produced by Shell warning of the possible consequences of climate change, prompting accusations that the company chose to ignore the situation in order to maximize profits.

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Shell “knew of climate change danger” since 1991 – Greenpeace response

Published by Greenpeace Southeast Asia: Thursday 2 March 2017

A film in 1991, produced by Shell, shows that the oil giant has long known about the catastrophic risks of climate change.

The film, titled Climate of Concern, was obtained by the Correspondent, a Dutch online journalism platform, and published in The Guardian’s article ‘Shell knew’: oil giant’s 1991 film warned of climate change danger.

In response, Desiree Llanos Dee, Climate Justice Campaigner for Greenpeace Philippines, said:

“Exxon knew. Shell knew. Now we must get to the bottom of what other fossil majors know and what they plan to do to avert catastrophic climate change. Shell’s empty rhetoric on climate is wholly contradicted by the core assumption underlying its business plans – global temperature increases in excess of 3°C and its lobbying against measures to mitigate climate change.

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In A 1991 Film, Shell Oil Issued A Stark Warning About Climate Change Risks

WASHINGTON — “Action now is seen as the only safe insurance.” 

That was among the many clear warnings that oil giant Shell issued in a film it produced about climate change more than 25 years ago. Many environmentalists, however, argue that the company has largely ignored its own alarm bells.

The 1991 film, “Climate of Concern,” resurfaced Tuesday on the Dutch online news outlet The Correspondent. It’s the latest in an ever-growing body of evidence that suggests the oil industry has long known about the climate risks associated with carbon dioxide emissions — and has actively worked to cover them up.

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Hindenburg Memories Cloud Shell’s Vision of Hydrogen Future

by Jess Shankleman

28 February 2017, 00:01 GMT 28 February 2017, 08:27 GMT

Taxi driver Theo Ellis, the first person in Europe to drive Toyota Motor Corp.’s hydrogen-powered Mirai sedan for business, loves telling passengers about the technology that emits nothing but water.

They ask him about its costs, greenness, and the majority inquire about safety. To his passengers, the word “hydrogen” evokes memories of the Hindenburg, the airship that was destroyed in half a minute when it caught fire in 1937, or the H-bomb, a successor to what the U.S. dropped on Japan to end World War II.

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Boss Of Royal Dutch Shell In The UK Describes Trump’s Clean Energy Stance As ‘Disappointing’

The Huffington Post: Boss Of Royal Dutch Shell In The UK Describes Trump’s Clean Energy Stance As ‘Disappointing’

George BowdenReporter, The Huffington Post UK

The boss of Shell in the UK has labelled President Donald Trump’s stance on new, cleaner forms of energy as “disappointing”.

Asked whether Trump had cast doubt the need for a global transition to green energy, Sinead Lynch, country chair of Shell in Britain, told The Huffington Post UK: “It’s disappointing. Obviously what we really want is a collaboration and alignment across all governments internationally, regionally, locally.”

As part of a renewed on focus on fossil fuels Trump’s administration has promised to open new coal mines, deleted references to climate change from White House websites, and pledged to scrap Barack Obama’s 2013 climate pact.

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Shell plans Australian solar plants that can switch to gas

MATT CHAMBERS Resources reporter: Melbourne4 Feb 2017

Anglo-Dutch oil giant Shell is looking to invest in Australian solar plants that can switch to gas when needed to deliver baseload power supply as debate rages over renewable energy security in the wake of South Australia’s ­crippling power outages.

Shell, which is Australia’s biggest LNG exporter and one of the world’s largest oil companies, has revealed that Australia was one of three global locations, along with Oman and Brunei, where it was studying pairing renewable energy with gas, after last year flagging “new energies” would be a potential major source of growth for the fossil fuel company beyond 2020.

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Shell nears deals to sell $5 bln of assets -CFO

By Karolin Schaps and Ron Bousso | LONDON

Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) is close to selling assets totaling $5 billion to cut debt following its acquisition of BG Group, the oil major said on Thursday as it reported its lowest full-year earnings in more than a decade.

Dealmaking in the oil and gas sector has been muted for more than two years due to collapsing oil prices, but as crude prices recover buyers and sellers are starting to agree on price tags.

For Shell, disposals of $3 billion in the fourth quarter helped shave $4.5 billion off its net debt and increase cashflow by 8 percent in the last three months of the year, Europe’s largest oil and gas company said.

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Oil majors, car makers to push hydrogen technology to help cut emissions

Ben van Beurden, chief executive officer of Royal Dutch Shell, speaks during a news conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, February 15, 2016. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes

The heads of some of the world’s biggest oil firms and automakers agreed on Tuesday to push for broader global use and bigger investments in using hydrogen to help reduce emissions and arrest global warming.

The oil firms’ and car makers’ chiefs said the plan was part of global efforts to keep global warming well below 2 degrees Celsius, an ambitious goal agreed by 195 countries in Paris in 2015.

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Toyota, Shell Among Giants Betting $10.7 Billion on Hydrogen

by John Lippert: 17 January 2017, 21:00 GMT Updated on 18 January 2017, 00:23 GMT

Toyota Motor Corp. and four of its biggest car-making peers are joining oil and gas giants including Royal Dutch Shell Plc and Total SA with plans to invest a combined 10 billion euros ($10.7 billion) in hydrogen-related products within five years.

In all, 13 energy, transport and industrial companies are forming a hydrogen council to consult with policy makers and highlight its benefits to the public as the world seeks to switch from dirtier energy sources, according to a joint statement issued from Davos, Switzerland. The wager demonstrates that batteries aren’t the only way to reduce pollution from cars, homes and utilities that are contributing to climate change.

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Opec outflanked

By Ed Crooks of the Finacial Times: January 13, 2017

In the 1930s many newspapers carried impressively detailed diagrams showing France’s defences along the German border, described by Popular Mechanix and Inventions magazine as the “world’s greatest underground fortifications”. By the end of May 1940, Hitler had demonstrated that while the Maginot Line might indeed be an engineering marvel, it was also irrelevant, as his panzer divisions swept past it through Belgium and into France. Last year’s agreement between leading oil-producing countries to curb their output had something of the same feel about it this week.

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Jennifer Hudson hit with abuse from cruel trolls telling her to ‘kill herself’ after appearing in music video campaign for Shell

Victimised: Jennifer Hudson has faced abuse from cruel trolls after appearing in a music video campaign for Shell

By Julia Pritchard for MailOnline

PUBLISHED: 13:05, 8 January 2017 | UPDATED: 13:24, 8 January 2017

Jennifer Hudson has faced abuse from cruel trolls after appearing in a music video campaign for Shell. 

The singer, 35, performs a song called Best Day Of My Life alongside Pixie Lott and four other musicians, in order to promote the brand’s support of clean energy.

However the Daily Star reports that the new judge of The Voice UK has been attacked by environmentalists for participating in the Make The Future campaign – with one particularly abusive user even telling her to kill herself.

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Oil Prices

Extracts from a weekly briefing by Ed Crooks: January 6, 2017

In our predictions for 2016, we were right that oil would end the year over $50 – modesty forbids me from mentioning which writer made that forecast – but missed that an agreement between Opec and non-Opec producers would be one of the factors underpinning the price. For 2017 Anjli Raval made the call, arguing that crude was again likely to end the year above $50, on the grounds that a lower price would still be too low to enable sufficient investment in production to meet demand.

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‘’EVs, Solar Could Push Oil Down To $10 By 2025’’

By Charles Kennedy – Dec 20, 2016, 4:38 PM CST

That prediction comes from Engie SA’s innovation chief, Thierry Lepercq, who says that oil demand will be hit on multiple fronts. He lays out five tsunamis: solar power, battery storage, electric vehicles, “smart” buildings, and cheap hydrogen. “Even if oil demand continues to climb until 2025, its price could drop to $10 if markets anticipate a significant fall in demand,” Lepercq told Bloomberg in an interview. Solar, battery storage, electrical and hydrogen vehicles, and connected devices are in a ‘J’ curve,” he added. “Hydrogen is the missing link in a 100 percent renewable-energy system, but technological bricks already exist.”

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Shell takes aim at British and German offshore wind deals

By Karolin Schaps | LONDON

Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) wants to buy into the British and German offshore wind markets as it attempts to shift its business away from fossil fuels.

Immediate opportunities in the world’s biggest offshore wind markets will be through buying stakes in leases, rather than building new projects, Dorine Bosman, business operations manager for Shell’s wind business, told Reuters on Tuesday.

The world’s second-biggest oil major on Monday won a contract to build 700 megawatts (MW) in offshore wind capacity off the Dutch coast together with consortium partners Eneco, Van Oord and Mitsubishi/DGE.

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Shell-led consortium wins 700 MW Dutch offshore wind contract

A consortium led by Royal Dutch Shell beat 26 other bids for a contract to build 700 megawatts of offshore wind capacity, the Dutch government said as it announced plans for a further seven wind farms to be build in the next decade.

Contractors Eneco, Van Oord and Mitsubishi/DGE are Shell’s partners in the consortium to build in the Borssele III and IV wind areas, which promised the Netherlands’ lowest-ever strike price of 54.50 euro cents per megawatt hours.

Speaking to reporters in Rotterdam, economic affairs minister Henk Kamp said intense competition, low interest rates and high existing capacity had helped keep prices low – a state of affairs he expected continue.

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Royal Dutch Shell invests in green power kite

by: Andrew Ward, Energy Editor

Royal Dutch Shell has teamed up with Eon and Schlumberger to invest in a new form of wind power that uses high-altitude kites to harness energy.

The Anglo-Dutch oil group and its partners will each take a stake in Kite Power Systems as the UK start-up races for leadership of a technology that has also attracted interest from Google.

SOURCE

RELATED HERALD SCOTLAND ARTICLE: Energy giants get behind kite power with £5m deal

THREE of the biggest names in the energy industry, led by Royal Dutch Shell, have backed a business that generates electricity from flying kites.

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We Must Harness the Power of Carbon Capture

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Ben Van Beurden

Van Beurden is the CEO of Royal Dutch Shell

“To make investments in clean energy technologies more attractive, governments must set an effective price on CO2 emissions”

Nobody can predict the future, but it is highly likely that global energy demand will grow for decades to come. There will be more people on this planet, more people will be living in cities, and more people will be seeking a better life. “A better life” in this context does not mean a tv in every room or a new smartphone every year. It does mean adequate housing, healthcare, sanitation, and modern transport.

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Shell ties in bonuses to reinforced emissions strategy

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By Ron Bousso and Karolin Schaps | LONDON

Royal Dutch Shell plans to link part of its executive bonuses to greenhouse gas emissions and conduct more active screening of future investments to further efforts to reduce the energy group’s carbon footprint, its CEO told Reuters.

The new initiative by the Anglo-Dutch group comes in response to mounting pressure from investors to adapt to an expected flattening in oil consumption within as little as five years and international plans to phase out fossil fuels by the end of the century to combat global warming.

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Shell studying acquisitions in the green energy sector

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screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-19-58-01Written by Reporter – 30/11/2016 2:02 pm

Shell said it is studying acquisitions in the green energy sector.

It comes amid shareholder pressure to look at a strategy beyond fossil fuels.

The oil major currently has a market value of $200billion and produces 2% of the world’s oil and gas.

Chief executive Ben Van Beurden said: “The idea you can just be a very clever observer and step in when the moment is right, forget about it.

“I am convinced that in this space we will play an active role, a leafing role and we will plan acquisitions in it.”

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Shell studies green energy deals to prepare for future after oil

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By Karolin Schaps and Ron Bousso | LONDON

Royal Dutch Shell, the world’s second-biggest publicly listed oil company, is studying acquisitions in the green energy sector, its CEO told Reuters, as it bows to shareholder demands for a strategy beyond fossil fuels.

Shell, which has a market value of $200 billion, produces two percent of the world’s oil and gas but rapid technological change coupled with policies to protect the climate have kick-started a shift in energy markets that has put enormous pressure on oil companies to plan for a time after fossil fuels.

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Opec cuts neither dead nor alive

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By Ed Crooks November 28, 2016

Opec’s possible production cut is the oil market equivalent of Schrödinger’s cat: neither dead nor alive. When they met in Algiers in late September, Opec ministers agreed the need to reduce output, but left the allocation of the cuts between individual members to be finalised later. If they cannot agree on that, the deal will die. At their meeting in Vienna on Wednesday, the ministers will have to open the box, and we will find out whether or not the agreement is still breathing.

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