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Up to 800 possible jobs for solar farm which has been given green light

Up to 800 possible jobs for solar farm which has been given green light

POWER FROM THE SUN: An example of a large-scale solar farm.

The Delga Solar Farm will be the project of Shell Australia, subsidiary of multi-national oil giant Royal Dutch Shell.

THE Western Downs is keeping up its want to be Australia’s “energy capital” as it has approved the development application for the eighth solar farm project in the region yesterday morning.

The 250MW Delga Solar Farm will be built 25km south-west of Wandoan. This continues the prominence of Wandoan in the region, adding to the largest solar farm in Australia to be built in the area, as well as the approval for a new coal mine. read more

Big Oil Follows Silicon Valley Into Backing Green Energy Firms

Oil majors quietly investing into new technology start-ups

‘Disruptive power’ from small companies prompts Shell to move

Major oil companies are joining Silicon Valley in backing energy-technology start-ups, a signal that that those with the deepest pockets in the industry are casting around for a new strategy.

From Royal Dutch Shell Plc to Total SA and Exxon Mobil Corp., the biggest investor-owned oil companies are dribbling money into ventures probing the edge of energy technologies. The investments go beyond wind and solar power into projects that improve electricity grids and brew new fuels from renewable resources. read more

Shell and Exxon face censure over claim gas was ‘cleanest fossil fuel’

The Dutch advertising watchdog will on Tuesday censure Shell and Exxon for claiming that natural gas was “the cleanest of all fossil fuels” in an advert earlier this year. It will be the second time this summer that the Netherlands advertising standards board has ruled against the fossil fuels industry… FULL ARTICLE 

Shell Prepares For A Different Energy Reality

: 14 August 2017

Summary

  • This summer has seen the governments of several of the world’s major economies propose to eliminate internal combustion engine vehicles over the next 10-30 years.
  • At the same time, Royal Dutch Shell announced several major clean energy investments over the summer in anticipation of a drop-off in petroleum demand.
  • This article looks at how Shell’s clean energy investments fit into its energy profile forecasts compared to its peers.

This summer has been filled with the sort of headlines that can give strategic planners in the petroleum & gas sector heartburn. One-upping Germany’s earlier non-binding pledge to ban new internal combustion engine [ICE] vehicles by 2030, the government of France’s new centrist president Emmanuel Macron announced in early July that the country will end sales of ICE vehicles by 2040. This move, which is part of that country’s efforts to comply with its greenhouse gas emission reduction target under 2015’s Paris Climate Agreement, would eliminate gasoline- and diesel-only engines and is aimed at reducing the country’s air pollution as it is at mitigating climate change. Britain intends to do the same by 2050. Even China and India, which have long been posited as important future sources of petroleum demand, are moving to electrify their vehicle fleets: China recently announced that it wants 25% of the country’s vehicles to be “alternative fuel” by 2025, while India is drafting plans to electrify all of its vehicles by 2030. read more

Equis Is Said to Seek Binding Bids for $4 Billion Power Assets

Equis Energy, the Singapore-based developer of power projects, has asked for binding bids for its $4 billion renewable energy business by late September, people with knowledge of the matter said.

A consortium led by I Squared Capital is among suitors chosen to proceed in the bidding for the portfolio of Asia Pacific assets, according to the people. The infrastructure investment firm is partnering with Thai utility Electricity Generating Pcl and Japanese trading house Mitsubishi Corp., the people said, asking not to be identified because the information is private. read more

Exxon Knew, Shell Knew, They All Knew

08/09/2017 07:17 am ET

In 2015, the Union of Concerned Scientists published its landmark exposé“The Climate Deception Dossiers,” which show that not only Exxon, but also Shell, BP, ConocoPhillips, Chevron and coal giant Peabody Energy were aware of the climate change reality since the 70s. Even so, through special interest groups, they invested tens of millions “to sow doubt and promote contrarian arguments they knew to be wrong.”

The fuel that powers this planetary sabotage is called greed. The fossil fuel industry worldwide has accumulated stratospheric levels of wealth over the decades. Moreover, according to a report just published by World Development, in 2015, fossil fuels received a staggering $5.3 trillion in subsidies around the world. This includes not only taxpayer money but also the costs of deaths caused by pollution and these fuels’ contribution to the climate crisis. read more

Electric cars threaten Brunei plan for oil bonanza

Electric cars threaten Brunei plan for oil bonanza

by: : 8 Aug 2017

Mohammad Yasmin Umar, energy minister, told the FT that Brunei’s energy production could rise… by 2035 to as high as 800,000.  But he acknowledged this aim could be jeopardised by the world oil price depression — and by possible longer-term trends such as the electric car’s “takeover” from combustion-powered vehicles in rich countries. Brunei Shell Petroleum Company… did not respond to a request for comment on the minister’s remarks. FULL FT ARTICLE read more

Oil major set to launch electricity supplier in Britain

Anglo-Dutch group applies for licence to supply power in UK

by Tsveta Zikolova 

Monday, 07 Aug 2017, 12:57 BSTRoyal Dutch Shell (LON:RDSA) is to launch an electricity supplier in Britain, The Times has revealed. The move is part of the group’s strategic push into the electricity sector as it adapts to rising global demand for clean energy.

Shell’s share price has advanced today, having added about 0.8 percent in mid-morning trade, and outperforming the benchmark FTSE 100 index which is up about 0.2 percent. The Anglo-Dutch group’s shares have added more than 15 percent to their value over the past year, but have given up a little over two percent in the year-to-date. read more

Shell invests in Singapore solar firm Sunseap; eyes solar projects

Reuters Staff: AUGUST 1, 2017 / 11:18 AM

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell has invested in Singapore-based solar firm Sunseap Group for an undisclosed sum as part of a planned collaboration on solar projects in the Asia-Pacific region, the companies said on Tuesday.

Shell declined to reveal the amount invested by Shell Technology Ventures, the company’s corporate venturing arm.

Privately held Sunseap Group has about 160 megawatts of distributed solar contracts in Singapore, holds an electricity retailer license and has secured utility scale solar projects in the region, the two companies said. read more

European oil majors seek to harness U.S. offshore wind

Karolin Schaps and Susanna Twidale: AUGUST 1, 2017 / 10:34 AM

LONDON (Reuters) – Some European oil majors have made inroads into the emerging U.S. offshore wind energy market, aiming to leverage their experience of deepwater development and the crowded offshore wind arena at home.

Late entrants to the offshore wind game in Europe, which began with a project off Denmark 25 years ago and is now approaching maturity, they are looking across the Atlantic at what they view as a huge and potentially lucrative new market. read more

BP and Shell face huge challenge from switch to electric cars

Petrol pumps will become a thing of the past as charging points replace them: WEEGEE (ARTHUR FELLIG)/INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY/GETTY IMAGES

Emily Gosden, Energy Editor: 31 July 2017

Oil investors are getting worried. Electric cars have accelerated on to the front pages. Sales are surging, carmakers are unveiling plans for all-electric models and this week Britain vowed to ban sales of petrol and diesel cars by 2040.

Yet if Big Oil believes that death is about to pull up in a Tesla, it’s doing a good job of hiding it. On Thursday, Ben van Beurden, the boss of Royal Dutch Shell, welcomed Britain’s plans and declared that his next car would be electric. And earlier in the year Spencer Dale, BP’s chief economist, bluntly described the arrival of electric vehicles on the oil majors’ lawn as “not a game-changer”, adding that not even “enormous” growth in sales of such vehicles would make a big dent in global oil demand. read more

OPEC’s Existential Sucker Punch

Julian Lee: July 30, 2017 3:00 AM EDT

You wait decades for an existential crisis, then two come along at once. At least that’s how it must feel for OPEC’s beleaguered ministers. In the short term the market for their oil is being eroded by rising production outside their control. Looking further ahead, oil demand itself is under threat from the electrification of road transport. OPEC may not yet be dead, but its days are surely numbered.

The most obvious short-term threat to the group comes from the rapid rise in U.S. shale oil, but the risks have expanded to include other areas like Brazil’s prolific sub-salt discoveries and more recent finds further north along the east coast of South America. read more

The electric jolt that roused Big Oil

Jillian Ambrose: 

Identifying a tipping point is not always easy. But when one of the world’s most powerful oil bosses says he is in the market for an electric car, there can be little doubt.

Ben van Beurden, the Royal Dutch Shell boss, last week delivered the clearest indication yet that the burgeoning electric vehicle industry is already hastening the decline of global oil demand. “When that will be is not certain. But that it will happen, we are certain,” he told investors. read more

Shell CEO Ben Van Beurden says his next car will be an electric Mercedes S500e


Jul 28 2017 at 9:03 AM

When the boss of Europe’s biggest listed oil company says his next car will be electric, it says a lot about the future of fossil fuels.

Royal Dutch Shell responded to the worst oil-price crash in a generation with its $US54 billion ($68 billion) takeover of BG Group, betting that demand for natural gas will rise as the world shifts to cleaner-burning fuels. Now chief executive officer Ben Van Beurden says the next thing he’ll buy is a car that doesn’t depend on either oil or gas to run. read more

Shell preparing for world economy that shifts away from oil

By DANICA KIRKA Associated Press

Royal Dutch Shell is planning for the day when demand for oil starts fading as major economies move away from oil and increasingly turn to electric-powered cars, Chief Executive Ben van Beurden said Thursday.

Van Beurden welcomed recent proposals to phase out passenger vehicles powered by fossil fuels in Britain and France, saying they are needed to combat global warming. Shell is looking at “very aggressive scenarios” as it makes plans to remain competitive in a world that gets more of its energy from renewable sources and less from crude oil, or “liquids,” he said. read more

Shell Wakes Up and Smells the Coffee (and Burgers)

July 27, 2017 12:23 PM EDT

The image of a driver slurping an iced latte while pulling a Mustang up to the drive-in window of a fast-food joint is either your idea of a capitalist apotheosis or civilization’s decadent demise.

Or … it’s what flashed through your mind as you listened to Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s earnings call on Thursday.

Jessica Uhl, Shell’s chief financial officer, at one point talked up the oil major’s marketing business:

We’re the world’s largest fuel retailer. Every day, Shell serves more than 30 million customers across our 43,000 sites in close to 80 countries. That is more sites than Starbucks; it is more than McDonald’s. read more

Shell gets everything right except producing oil

Andy Critchlow: JULY 27, 2017

LONDON (Reuters Breakingviews) – Royal Dutch Shell is great at producing profit, but less so at producing oil. The Anglo-Dutch energy giant has more than tripled its earnings in the second quarter, helped by the strong performance of its downstream refining business and recovering prices. With its debt falling too, the company is doing the right things for shareholders – except in the crucial area of pumping more fuel.

At first glance, Shell’s financial performance suggests that three years in the doldrums for big oil majors may have come to an end. On Thursday, the company reported an impressive 245 percent year-on-year rebound in clean earnings to $3.6 billion for the three-month period ending in June. Prices, which recovered from a slump last January below $30 per barrel, have helped, but there is more to it. read more

Shell sees oil demand peaking by late 2020s as electric car sales grow

By Ron Bousso and Karolin Schaps

LONDON, July 27 (Reuters) – The world’s oil consumption could peak as early as the end of the next decade as electric vehicles become more popular, Royal Dutch Shell Chief Executive Ben van Beurden said on Thursday.

The prospect of a decline in oil consumption after more than a century of growth as the world switches to burning cleaner fuels is gathering pace. On Wednesday Britain announced plans to ban diesel and gasoline vehicles by 2040, following a similar move by France. read more

Report: Gas could be sidelined by renewables in parts of Australia

Royal Dutch Shell, meanwhile, announced its Prelude vessel, a first-of-a-kind ship designed to process LNG off the coast of Western Australia, arrived at its destination after leaving a South Korean shipyard in June. With LNG emerging in market share because of its diverse deliverability options, Shell said the Prelude floating LNG vessel opens up new export opportunities.

By Daniel J. Graeber: 26 July 2017

July 26 (UPI) — With Australia monitoring natural gas demand, a consultant group found gas-fired power could get squeezed out in parts of the country as renewables get cheaper.

A research project from Wood Mackenzie, in coordination with GTM Research, found that wind, solar and battery costs might decline enough to the point that, by 2025, they’re competitive with gas-powered plants. For batteries in particular, whose costs are expected to decline by as much as 50 percent over the next decade, the researchers found storage capacity will be enough to meet the region’s peak residual demand. read more

Shell, SoftBank Weigh Bids for Asia Renewables Firm Worth Up to $5 Bln – Sources

SINGAPORE — Royal Dutch Shell and SoftBank are among several global groups considering bidding for Equis Energy, Asia’s largest independent renewable energy producer valued at up to $5 billion (3.84 billion pounds), sources familiar with the matter said.

Japanese trading companies, global pension funds and buyout firms are also in the fray to buy Singapore-based Equis, the sources said, at a time when many Asian governments are expanding the use of renewable power and its costs are falling. read more

This could be the next big strategy for suing over climate change

July 20 at 1:13 PM

Two California coastal counties and one beach-side city touched off a possible new legal front in the climate change battle this week, suing dozens of major oil, coal, and other fossil fuel companies for the damages they say they will incur due to rising seas.

The three cases, which target firms such as Chevron, ExxonMobil, BP and Royal Dutch Shell, assert that the fossil fuel producers are collectively responsible for about 20 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions between 1965 and 2015. They claim that industry “knew or should have known” decades ago about the threat of climate change, and want companies to pay the costs of communities forced to adapt to rising seas. read more

Investors Squeezing Oil & Gas Developers To Cut Methane

Investors Squeezing Oil & Gas Developers To Cut Methane

, I write about the global energy business.: July 20, 2017: Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

Oil and gas developers may soon be feeling the effects of a one-two punch — an adverse court ruling dealing with their methane emissions and now an investor-led initiative pushing them to be more transparent.

Natural gas, of course, has become the fuel of choice — a fuel that markets itself as far less pollutive than coal. But methane is its main component, which is 84 times more potent than CO2, although its lifespan is 20 years compared to 100. Indeed, methane makes up about 25% of the global warming today. read more

Shell Oil recently left the Corrib gas field with losses of 2 billion

Opinion: ‘Just one week after banning fracking, we started drilling for oil’

We need a just transition to a low carbon economy, not a sell-off of our future, write Sinead Mercier and Louise Michelle Fitzgerald.

IN AN ORWELLIAN twist of double-speak, on 11 July, just one week after onshore fracking was banned in Ireland, Minister of Communications, Climate Action and Environment Denis Naughten granted consent to Providence Resources PLC to commence drilling for oil in the Porcupine Basin off our south-west coast.

If catastrophic climate change is to be avoided, existing fossil fuels must be kept in the ground. Providence Resources states that they expect to find 5 billion barrels of oil.

As George Orwell wrote in 1984, “doublethink means the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one’s mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them”. read more

Shell to operate fast charging at selected Shell stations in the Netherlands and in the United Kingdom

Shell and Allego are working together to install and operate the first fast chargers for electric vehicles at selected Shell service stations. The project will include selected charging sites at Shell stations in the United Kingdom and in The Netherlands. The goal is that fast chargers are expected to be operational at all selected locations by the end of 2017. The first chargers are due to open in Greater London, Derby and the western part of the Netherlands (Randstad). read more

Aramco IPO: How It Will Stack Up Against Exxon & Shell

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As Saudi Aramco’s much hyped IPO approaches, the company’s most recent annual review, released last week, provides insight into its strategic direction. Aramco has positioned itself to be accepted by investors as a major international oil company (IOC) and as a globally diversified energy enterprise with integrated downstream and sales operations around the world. Currently, Aramco is a national oil company (NOC), owned by the government. But upon its expected public offering of shares, it will join the ranks of other major IOCs. read more

Oil majors among top contributors to greenhouse emissions, report says

by

More than half of global industrial emissions can be traced back to just 25 corporate and state producing entities, the report says.

China, India and Russia’s coal industries and major oil and gas players like Saudi Aramco, Gazprom, ExxonMobil, BP and Shell are among those named in the paper from CDP, formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project.

The research found that 100 active fossil fuel producers were linked to 71% of global industrial greenhouse gases since 1988. read more

‘Big oil’ dismisses predictions of collapse in demand

by: , Energy Editor: 10 July 2017

Saudi Aramco and Royal Dutch Shell acknowledged that a shift towards renewable energy — including battery-powered cars — was under way but said oil and gas would remain indispensable for decades to come. Ben van Beurden of Shell said the transition to low-carbon technologies would “take place over generations” rather than as a rapid “revolution”.

FULL FT ARTICLE

Shell Plans to Spend $1 Billion a Year on Clean Energy by 2020

Royal Dutch Shell Plc plans to spend as much as $1 billion a year on its New Energies division as the transition toward renewable power and electric cars accelerates.

“In some parts of the world we are beginning to see battery electric cars starting to gain consumer acceptance” while wind and solar costs are falling fast, Shell CEO Ben Van Beurden said in a speech in Istanbul on Monday. “All of this is good news for the world and must accelerate,” while still offering opportunities for producers of fossil fuels. read more

Shell No.9 in Top 100 greenhouse gas emitters since 1988

Jon Yeomans: 

The Chinese coal industry and stock market debutant Saudi Aramco have been named as the world’s biggest emitters of carbon dioxide.

As new data claims to have identified the top 100 emitters of greenhouse gases over the last three decades, a leading NGO has warned that natural  resources companies need to transform their business models to adapt to a low-carbon future.

Just 100 firms are responsible for 71pc of carbon dioxide gases released into the atmosphere since 1988, the year that climate change was first recognised as an international problem, according a report by the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP). read more

Shell Sees Rising Investment in Renewables

ISTANBUL — Royal Dutch Shell will be spending up to $1 billion a year by 2020 on projects within its new energies division, Chief Executive Ben van Beurden told an industry conference on Monday.

Shell set up the division to focus on renewable energy and new technologies to help lower carbon emissions.

“Shell is determined to find solutions and will be spending up to $1 billion (775.49 million pounds) a year on our new energies division by the end of the decade,” van Beurden told the conference. read more

It’s a world of worry for oil companies

By Ryan Maye Handy: 8 July 2017

India hopes to sell only electric vehicles by 2030. China is offering incentives to buy electric cars and investing heavily in renewable technologies. Volvo will scrap the pure internal combustion engine in favor of hybrids and electric cars.

And on Thursday, France announced it plans to ban the sale of diesel and gasoline-fueled cars by 2040.

The world’s major oil companies might disagree when global demand for petroleum will peak, but the news of the past seven months suggests that they should be worried, if they aren’t already. Nations, states and private companies are demanding cleaner energy, leaving the world’s oil producers to face a reckoning that many haven’t yet accepted. read more

Companies have to open up about climate risks – Shell CEO

Climate change poses one of the biggest long-term risks to the global economy and companies, including big oil and gas firms such as Shell, have to be open about how the risks will affect them, its chief executive said on Tuesday.

Shell, one of the biggest oil and gas producing firms in the world, is under growing pressure from some shareholders to improve its carbon footprint and sustainability credentials.

Shell said it assesses climate change risks internally but it has so far not disclosed in detail what financial impact climate-related risks could have. read more

Shell acquires local power company MP2

By Ryan Maye Handy: 29 June 2017

Royal Dutch Shell said Thursday that it plans to acquire MP2 Energy, a power and retail electric company based in the Woodlands, as the oil major seeks to diversify its business.

The transaction, if approved by regulators, would expand Shell’s electricity business beyond the West Coast into Texas, the Midwest and the East Coast. MP2, which manages power plants and runs a retail electric business, serves mostly industrial and commercial customers. In Texas, however, it offers residential electric plans for customers, including a program with rooftop solar systems. The company also operates in Illinois, Ohio and Pennsylvania. read more

Shell Welcomes Final Recommendations in Climate Report

by  Rigzone Staff: Thursday, June 29, 2017

Royal Dutch Shell plc has welcomed the final recommendations set out in a report published Thursday by the Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD). 

“I agree that companies should be clear about how they plan to be resilient in the face of climate change and energy transition,” Shell CEO Ben van Beurden said in a company statement.

“I believe it is right that it should be transparent which companies are truly on firm foundations over the long-term. I applaud the task force for its work to achieve this aim and I have signed a letter confirming Shell’s support for the initiative,” he added. read more

Shell Energy North America Signs Purchase Agreement To Acquire MP2 Energy LLC

HOUSTON, June 29, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Shell Energy North America (“SENA”) announced today that it has signed a purchase agreement for the acquisition of MP2 Energy LLC (MP2). Subject to regulatory approvals, the transaction is expected to be closed in the 3rd quarter of 2017.

Through self-developed proprietary systems and technology, MP2 provides market based solutions to commercial and industrial customers for managing energy supply, load, and generation.  MP2 is unique in its skill set and at the front of the curve when it comes to developing fit for purpose solutions to its customers, which face ever more complicated energy choices. read more

Shell endorses climate task-force recommendations

By Daniel J. Graeber: June 29, 2017

June 29 (UPI) — The first in the industry, Royal Dutch Shell said it’s aligned with a transparency measure on climate steered by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

“I agree that companies should be clear about how they plan to be resilient in the face of climate change and energy transition,” Shell CEO Ben van Beurden said in a statement.

Bloomberg steered efforts through the multilateral Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures, which said the transition to a low-carbon economy could require as much as $1 trillion in net investments per year. read more

Shell Signs Agreement for biofuel technology

CALGARY, June 27, 2017 /CNW/ – Royal Dutch Shell plc, through its subsidiary Shell International Exploration and Production B.V. (“Shell”), and SBI BioEnergy Inc. have reached an agreement granting Shell exclusive development and licensing rights for SBI’s biofuel technology. Edmonton-based SBI has a patented process that can convert a wide range of waste oils, greases and sustainable vegetable oils into lower carbon drop-ins for diesel, jet fuel and gasoline. Under the agreement, Shell and SBI will work together to demonstrate the potential of the technology and, if successful, scale up for commercial application. read more

Shell in clean energy race

It wants to be leader in the business and establish itself across full value chain of renewables, alternative energies

Royal Dutch Shell aims to be a leader in clean energy and sees an opportunity in using its global presence and established brand to scale up the new energies business quickly as and when. PHOTO: REUTERS

ROYAL Dutch Shell aims to be a leader in clean energy and sees an opportunity in using its global presence and established brand to scale up the new energies business quickly as and when.

The second largest-publicly traded oil company in the world also plans on establishing itself across the full value chain of renewables and alternative energies as it has done for oil, said a senior executive in the firm. read more

Shell Sees Ability to Manage Risk Giving Edge in Offshore Wind

Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Europe’s most valuable oil company, expects its expertise in managing risk will make it a market leader in developing the clean-energy industry.

Offshore wind projects are attracting billions of dollars of investment and will become “the energy backbone” for European countries from Germany to the U.K., said Mark Gainsborough, Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s head of new energies. 

Oil companies have a natural advantage in that business, since they have spent decades learning how to manage financial, political and project-development risks, he said. That gives them an edge over renewable energy developers, who prefer to pin down long-term power-purchase agreements or government support before moving forward. As the renewables industry shifts to more subsidy-free projects, it may be the established oil companies that can handle the gambles that come with competing at market prices. read more

Shell: step up building huge North Sea offshore wind farms

June 9, 2017

Wind energy not only has the potential to develop into the most important sustainable energy source, but it is also the cheapest means of generating power, according to Mark Gainsborough, head of Royal Dutch/Shell’s new energy division.

Gainsborough said the current generation of North Sea wind farms are too small. Speaking at a wind energy meeting in London earlier this week, he made a plea for larger cross-border offshore wind projects, the Financieele Dagblad said on Friday. read more

After oilsands divestments, Shell Canada refocuses on gas, chemicals and renewables

Geoffrey Morgan | June 6, 2017 4:27 PM ET
More from Geoffrey Morgan | @geoffreymorgan

Shell Canada President & Country Chair Michael Crothers during an interview in Calgary, Alberta: Photograph by Todd Korol for National Post

CALGARY – Shell Canada Ltd. will soon announce a project to turn vegetable products into diesel fuel in Alberta, as part of the company’s transition to produce less oil and more energy from natural gas, renewables and chemicals.

This follows Shell’s massive US$7.25-billion divestment of its oilsands assets, announced March 9. The company still plans to build an LNG terminal in British Colombia, but no timeline has been set. read more

ELECTRIC CAR: SHELL BETS ON FAST AND INTELLIGENT CHARGING

Intelligent recharge in the face of park growth

The Royal Dutch Shell will soon be able to offer its fast and intelligent charging system to an increasing number of customers owning electric and hybrid rechargeable vehicles. The Anglo-Dutch company recently declared that it had successfully passed the test phase and was now considering deploying it on a wider scale .”We are developing an intelligent , connected load system that communicates with the power grid so that cars take on plentiful energy,” said John Abbott, Shell’s operations director, to describe the proposed new service By his group. read more

Shell still working to reduce emissions despite U.S. pullout from Paris agreement

President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of the Paris climate agreement Thursday, but one of the largest companies in the world said it will still do its part to provide clean energy.

Shell Chemicals, which is building a $6 billion ethane cracker plant along the Ohio River in Potter Township, said Thursday that the company’s “position on climate change and the importance of the Paris agreement is well known.” read more

Shell fears ‘backlash’ from Paris deal exit

President Trump’s decision to pull out of the Paris climate agreement risks exposing oil companies to a tough regulatory backlash from future US administrations, Royal Dutch Shell has warned.

The Anglo-Dutch company has been one of the most outspoken oil industry supporters of the 2015 accord, telling Mr Trump that withdrawal would weaken America’s position globally.

Andy Brown, one of Shell’s most senior executives, said he feared that the decision and a corresponding weakening of emissions reduction efforts could also store up problems for fossil fuel companies in future, triggering “a backlash on regulation against an industry like ours” in a post-Trump era.

Speaking to The Times shortly before Mr Trump confirmed his decision on Thursday night, Mr Brown said: “In a part of the… read more

Shell’s Make the Future Live attracts 30,000

Written by

Shell’s Make the Future Live took place at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford, London from Thursday to Sunday.

The four-day extravaganza featured a number of inspiring and thoughtprovoking exhibits on the future of energy and how the world will have to move away from fossil fuels for energy in the future.

Some famous faces were also in attendance. Jason Bradbury from the Gadget Show and comedian Richard Ayoade hosted a podcast asking if London can become the world’s first carbon neutral city by 2050. read more

Energy-Generating Kites Backed by Shell Set for Test in Scotland

By Anna Hirtenstein: May 26, 2017 (Bloomberg) — Power-generating kites backed by Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Schlumberger Ltd. and EON SE will start tests in the U.K. this summer, with the aim of developing a technology that could eventually replace offshore wind turbines.

Kite Power Systems, known as KPS, is working on a 17-meter device that flies on air currents high above the ground and generates power by pulling at a cable. It raised 5 million pounds ($6.4 million) from the three energy giants last December.

“The reason we are interested in something like this is that it has potential to reduce the cost of offshore wind in the future,” said Geert van de Wouw, managing director of Shell Technology Ventures BV. “Fundamentally, looking at the science, flying the kite at high altitudes so there’s lots of wind, and the cost of materials is quite a lot lower than a normal offshore wind turbine.” read more

Royal Dutch Shell develops smart charging for electric cars to prevent blackouts

Shell plans to install ten rapid-charging points for electric vehicles on its British petrol station forecourts this year: SHELL

Royal Dutch Shell is stepping up its drive into the electric vehicle market by developing smart charging technology to prevent battery-powered cars causing blackouts.

The oil major said it had tested the service, which intelligently controls when cars draw electricity from the grid, in London, Hamburg and San Diego, and was drawing up plans for its commercial deployment.

An increasing number of companies are looking at the issue because of concerns that power grids cannot cope with the demand from even modest numbers of electric vehicles charging at the same time. read more

Shell shareholders reject emissions target proposal

By Karolin Schaps | THE HAGUE

Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) shareholders on Tuesday widely rejected a proposal by an environmental group calling for the oil company to set and publish annual targets to reduce carbon emissions.

The vote is a setback for climate activists who are increasing pressure on global oil companies, including U.S. firms Exxon Mobil (XOM.N) and Chevron (CVX.N), to become more ambitious in helping combat climate change.

Around 94 percent of Shell shareholders who cast a vote decided against resolution 21, according to final results reported following the company’s annual general meeting (AGM) in The Hague. Roughly 5 percent of voters abstained. read more

Shareholders criticise Shell over climate change commitments

Written by

Royal Dutch Shell has been rapped over its climate change commitments, with shareholders criticising its rejection of emissions targets that would bring it in line with the Paris climate accord.

Shareholders at the oil giant’s annual general meeting (AGM) at The Hague spent hours questioning Shell’s board members, who said that while the company supported the Paris agreement, setting company targets was “not in the best interest of the company”.

Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden said his company was making progress in lowering its emissions, but that achieving Paris Climate Agreement goals – which aim to limit global warming to below 2 degrees Celsius from pre-industrial levels – would require broader coordination, including active government support. read more

Shell CEO says climate change is real, but energy demand growth is ‘unstoppable’

The threat of climate change is real and action is needed, says Ben van Beurden, the chief executive of Royal Dutch Shell.

Ben van Beurden also touched on the oil giant’s transformation, millennials, the new Trump administration and more in a May 17 interview with The Washington Post.

It’s been a turbulent couple of years for the Shell chief executive. With the roller coaster in crude oil prices, the company’s stock has lurched from a high of $83.12 a share six months after he took charge to a low of $36.87 a share. The stock has climbed back, but revenues have plunged by a third since 2013. The shareholders’ annual meeting is Tuesday at The Hague. read more

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